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Here is a shot of my set up. I believe mine is two inches across.

Very Nice...Thanks for showing the layout...I'm thinking of using one of these in the Foredom handpiece. Do you think the fine grit burr will be coarse enough to handle very dense maple or would the coarse burr be a better choice.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000943/10247/Carving-Burr-Gold-Fine-Grit-14-Shank.aspx

Thanks for your time

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Chris, I use one of the Kutzall carving burrs in my drill press. Not as aggressive as the mill, I like my fingers just the way they are. The one I use is the donut shaped one with the silver r

Hi Chris I started working on a violin a few years ago but had to put it off because of illness. I'm getting back into it now. If I remember right, at that time I believe Michael Darnton

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Very Nice...Thanks for showing the layout...I'm thinking of using one of these in the Foredom handpiece. Do you think the fine grit burr will be coarse enough to handle very dense maple or would the coarse burr be a better choice.

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2000943/10247/Carving-Burr-Gold-Fine-Grit-14-Shank.aspx

Thanks for your time

I've never used the finer grit. One of the things about the Kutzall that I like is they don't ware out. If they get clogged all you have to do is take a propane torch and burn the build up out and it's good as new. Doesn't hurt the grit a bit.

Berl

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Hi all,

For those afraid of the rotary file, and it is definitely dangerous, there is the Wagner "Safe-T-Planer."

http://www.stewmac.com/shopby/item/0485?utm_source=google&utm_medium=shopping&utm_campaign=2010-11-gp

It is not quite as easy to follow your inner line and I haven't had much luck in the center of the C-bouts because of the larger diameter, but it is still a great time saver and much safer. Some also use it with success to make a terraced rough arch.

Will

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The 5mm high level edge is what the J&C book refers to as the purfling platform. The tool bit you have shown...is it an end cutting rotary file? How well does it level the edges...what is the shank size and where the heck can I buy one to try?

Thank you

-Ernie

I'm not sure what it's called, but any Dremel dealer should have them. Shank is 1/8".

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Are the carving (reciprocating) hand pieces of much use? Thanks,

I had a Automach reciprocating carver. It was expensive and as reciprocating carvers go It was a good tool. I sold it because I can do the carving just as fast with good sharp gouges. I think (just my opinion) if your going to spend 250 to 300 dollars get good gouges and good sharpening stones. You can get some pretty nice stuff for $300.00. Like I said this is just my opinion, others may disagree.

Berl

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I use a slotting saw,similar to this oneIt is far safer and easier to use. I set it in a drill press. It gives a uniform flat surface.

Oded

I use this too. You still have to hold the plate firmly so it doesn't grab and shoot across the room, and you want to use a slow-ish speed. You also can't see the edge of the blade to know where you're cutting, so I rig up a coathanger to point at it. On the plus side, you're only cutting a thin slot, and don't have to convert a lot of wood into tiny chips... so it's pretty fast. The overhang you gouge off later. There also is no tear-out problem that I have ever noticed, in any kind of wood. You DO have to make sure the blade is exactly parallel to the table, otherwise the cut will drift.

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Funny, I always dreaded slotting saws.

I feel the same way. Anything that can grab the plate and tear it out of your hands is too aggressive and dangerous. A least with the little Dremel burr there isn't enough power involved to potentially do much damage and lose control.

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I feel the same way. Anything that can grab the plate and tear it out of your hands is too aggressive and dangerous. A least with the little Dremel burr there isn't enough power involved to potentially do much damage and lose control.

And not just the plate, but the cutter can pull your fingers or hands into it as well if you're not constantly careful.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have been lucky enough to have found two Foredom tools, tossed out in junk piles, over the years. They both work

perfectly well. The more recent one is complete with variable speed foot control. It seems a shame that I get

extremely little use out of them, but I won't let go of them because when one of these is needed, there is

nothing better for the job than a Foredom tool. Compared to a Dremel, they're in another league entirely.

CJ

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I have been lucky enough to have found two Foredom tools, tossed out in junk piles, over the years. They both work

perfectly well. The more recent one is complete with variable speed foot control. It seems a shame that I get

extremely little use out of them, but I won't let go of them because when one of these is needed, there is

nothing better for the job than a Foredom tool. Compared to a Dremel, they're in another league entirely.

CJ

I just received my new Foredom tool today and am very pleased with the quality of this tool...It is a pleasure to use...no wobble no vibration...splendid!

-Ernie

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Does anyone on here actually do purfling by hand? :(

I did do my previous fiddle purfling channel all by hand just for the challenge of it.

I would imagine just like anything else, one would eventually develop the

skill and become more efficient with experience, just not as efficient as

the power tool method.

My "power" method is drill press and adjustable stop guide, which leaves me with

back button and corners to do by hand each time.

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Guest EdwardPA

Hi Ernie,

Here is a picture of what Michael Darntons uses to cut the purfling platform. I bought one that is about 1.25 inches in diameter. It is used in a drill press and the tape (see picture) is a great idea for the area that won't be doing any cutting. As he said, use this with extreme care. I clamped a plate with an extruding pin to the table of the drill press to control how far I cut into the plate (horizontally).

note: If you want the corners to be thicker than the rest of the purfling platform you'll have to raise the bit when cutting the corners.

Chris

post-24557-053071800 1290086569_thumb.jpg

Hi Chris

I started working on a violin a few years ago but had to put it off because of illness. I'm getting back into it now. If I remember right, at that time I believe Michael Darnton said he got his cutter at Grainger Industrial Supply. I searched their web site and was not able to find that cutter. Can you recall where you purchased your cutter? Your help will be greatly appreciated. Regards

Ed

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Hi Chris

I started working on a violin a few years ago but had to put it off because of illness. I'm getting back into it now. If I remember right, at that time I believe Michael Darnton said he got his cutter at Grainger Industrial Supply. I searched their web site and was not able to find that cutter. Can you recall where you purchased your cutter? Your help will be greatly appreciated. Regards

Ed

Hi Ed, I'm glad you're back at it.

Here is the link

http://www.discount-tools.com/80single.cfm

I purchased the 1-inch diameter bit. It works very well. I suggest you add a few layers of tape to the sides as shown in the Darnton picture.

Chris

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Guest EdwardPA

Hi Ed, I'm glad you're back at it.

Here is the link

http://www.discount-tools.com/80single.cfm

I purchased the 1-inch diameter bit. It works very well. I suggest you add a few layers of tape to the sides as shown in the Darnton picture.

Chris

Hi Chris

That's great!! Thanks for the link. I've been searching the net without much luck. I'll order one Monday.

Regards

Ed

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This is a Dremel, with a jig that has been modified. I don't know if he designed it or not, but I copied Will Whedbee's.

The tracing edge is lowered to match the instrument edge thickness, a hole is tapped, and a screw and washer are added to create a step that rides the top of the instrument as well. This allows it to be used on the flat surface, but it further helps control the depth of the cut.

post-24331-0-84063600-1290978896_thumb.jpg

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