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aksockeye

Best strings

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What are the best strings for the instrument that you play? What kind of instrument?

What style of sound do you look for? I know that this is a subjective question.

What is your choice set-up, why?

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What are the best strings for the instrument that you play? What kind of instrument?

What style of sound do you look for? I know that this is a subjective question.

What is your choice set-up, why?

On my violin (Strad model) I use Dominant G, D, A, and Goldbrokat E. My violin has a somewhat dark sound and the Dominants keep it from getting too dark. The Goldbrokat E gives a beautiful silvery ring to the higher notes on the E.

On my viola (Maggini model) I use Evah Perazzi C, G, and D, and Jargar A. I like the dark, woody viola sound of the Brescian style instruments. The Evah Perazzi strings respond and project well. The Jargar A is brighter but not overwhelming.

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I set my violins up with Dominant med and a Hill E. I have some Goldbrokat E's so must try them. I've heard Golden Spiral solo are nice E strings.

On my 'fiddles'- I have Tomastik superflexible.

Geoff

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On my relatively modern del gesu modeled violin, 354mm back, I am presently using Tonica G and D (silver) with Infeld Red A and Jarger Forte E...this was suggested by my luthier and I'm very happy with it. I had been using the new Peter Infeld strings with platinum E...and although they sounded fantastic the first week, I quickly grew disillusioned...

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Depending on Fiddle and Style...Helicore (Heavy or Medium Gauge)...Prim (Medium Gauge)...Evah Pirazzi (Medium Gauge)...

E-Strings... Gold Label (Heavy or Medium Gauge), Jarger (Forte), Larsen (Medium Gauge), Westminster (Heavy or Medium), Evah Pirazzi (Medium Gauge)

I've done lots of experimenting and these are the strings I use most...

I would like to try the Warchal Strings...

-Ernie

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For setups (and mostly for keeps too) I use Warchal Karneols on both violin and viola. For the cherry-on-top I use Warchal Brilliant Vintage on violin - unbelievable response and tone.

For all fraction-size violins I use Warchal Ametyst - I have found nothing to beat them, and they are very affordable.

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A good start are DOMINANTs with a Jargar or Larsen E string.

With out a doubt your recommendation is the best advice to start.

Where do you go from here? New instrument? Old instrument? Looking

for a dark tone, bright tone, how many sets of strings have you tried

yourself? I am just asking, You are not expected to know the answer.

Thank you for your reply.

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In my opinion (that's rather limited experiences in strings other Dominants), Dominant is always a good start. It'll tell you a lot about your instrument, whether it's good, or bad, bright or dark, responsive or not.

I've had a few instruments where all of them were once strung up with dominants (and some still are), they all sound pretty different despite being strung up with same strings. In my opinion dominant is a very honest, unlike e.g. evah pirazzi that I tried on one of my instrument and played on few others with evahs on them, they all sound pretty much alike.

I've also tried new formula tonica which is a little on the stiff side with a pretty thin sound character, especially the G string.

Infeld blue and red are very nice too and they're slightly thicker sounding than original dominants where blue is brighter than the red.

In my case, original set of dominant is what I need. My instrument doesn't need "better" strings and it has true projection quality with lot of control over the tone color and dynamics. Brilliance and thickness of the sound is very balanced too. E string is a little overpowering the rest and on the thin side, but that's what I'm used to.

If dominant doesn't sound good on your instrument, a good chance is that the instrument isn't very well sounding to begin with.

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Dominants have been so "dominant" in the market laugh.gif that everyone uses them as the standard point of start, as already said. I've been using them on the instruments I sell for quite a long time, of course without that disgusting E and using Goldbrokat E insterad. But lately I have switched to Tonicas. They sound good right from the start, without that disturbing metallic sound of the Dominants and with a good default E. And they last longer.

For my own two personal violins I use Thomastk Vision Solo and what Tomastik sells as the "Wiena Melange". I will try the new Thomastk PI as soon as I have to replace the Vision solos on my old Italian.

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For new instruments ive always gone back to Dominants with a Hill E. I have Olives on one violin i play and Dominants with a gold label E. I often use Visions as well and they are relatively cheap in the UK and sound quite good.I find many of these newer strings appear to be in fashion for a while, and its very expensive to keep trying them all,though i used to experiment alot.

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For classical & smooth / rich pop music, new age, etc, I'm totally hooked on the "Heifetz" setup:

Wound gut G, Unwound heavyish-gauge gut D & A, and a gold-steel E.

For country, I'm still searching, but those bloody Helicores really do work. I'd like to find a string with the bite & crunch of the Helicore, but just a little more warmth & richness. Haven't found it yet, but I can no longer afford to experiment wildly. Someday.....

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If your violin is fine with Dominant, then you can try to "upgrade " to Obligato (though expensive). They are really good and more supple under the finger (less tension). I really enjoyed them.

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Many of the new strings I tested sounded to bright for my taste.

As already mentioned, the Dominants with a good non Dominant E string is a good starting point because we can

evaluate the sound of the instrument, and then, if necessary, change to a brighter or darker option.

The equation to be solved is always strument+strings+player style and level, so that strings must never be considered alone.

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For classical & smooth / rich pop music, new age, etc, I'm totally hooked on the "Heifetz" setup:

Wound gut G, Unwound heavyish-gauge gut D & A, and a gold-steel E.

My understanding of the Heifetz setup is a bare gut A, covered G&D and steel wire E.

What's your source

OK

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BC wrote:

For Cello,

1Larsen 2Dominant 3Dominant 4Spirocore.

Oh Yuck.....

1Larsen 2Larsen 3spirocore steel/silver or tungsten 4Spirocore steel/silver or tungsten I also like Prim for G/C or Helicore G/C

New Kaplan strings are quite good (nothing really beats a larsen A

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Oh hell, I'll bite.

Cello:

C Spirocore tungsten medium

G Belcanto

D Jargar dolce

A Jargar medium

Violin #1

G / D / A Larsen Tzigane soft

E Dominant gold weich (that's right, a Dominant E! nyah nyah)

Violin #2 (electric)

All strings - Super-Sensitive Octava. Me no like. "Alternative to Dominants" my toosh!

What are these threads for, anyway? biggrin.gif

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I put Peter Infeld strings on my violin.

I like them.

My 18" viola is a problem.

Normal strins are very harsh. And they break.

I use super sensitive 18" sensicore (nylon core)

They work.

Super sensitive also makes tungsten wrapped C strings

for small violas.

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My understanding of the Heifetz setup is a bare gut A, covered G&D and steel wire E.

What's your source

OK

If you believe Wikipedia, "Heifetz was very particular about his choice of strings. For his entire career he used a silver wound tricolore gut g-string, plain gut unvarnished d- and a-strings, and a Goldbrokat steel e-string medium including clear Hill brand rosin sparingly. Heifetz believed that playing on gut strings was important in rendering an individual sound."

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If you believe Wikipedia, "Heifetz was very particular about his choice of strings. For his entire career he used a silver wound tricolore gut g-string, plain gut unvarnished d- and a-strings, and a Goldbrokat steel e-string medium including clear Hill brand rosin sparingly. Heifetz believed that playing on gut strings was important in rendering an individual sound."

On any good photo of Heifetz with his violin, the gut D and A strings are easy to observe.

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