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E string parchment


richardz
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iburkhard:

Thanks for the response. Funny, but from my experience when the string digs into the wood, I recall a more muted effect, because the string is not vibrating freely.

My real question though is: when the string is sitting on a new freshly made parchment, does the parchment alter the sound in any way, like does it pad the string and stop some of the extremely high frequencies or does it not interact with the vibrating string in any way?

Put another way: True or false:

The parchment has no effect whatsoever on the sound of the vibrating e string?

(and, if false, What effect does the parchment have on the sound of the vibrating string)

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The parchment enables the brightest sound you are going to get out of a given e string, some people myself included prefer to mute the string slightly with the plastic sleeve, either way is acceptable but the parchment is definetly brighter in the harmonics, not the fundamental :mellow:

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I read somewhere that putting a dab of superglue on the string slot would serve as reinforcement (maybe here on MN? Can't remember). I tried it, and I like it. The blotch might be a little unsightly to some highly scrutinizing eyes, but I pay no mind because the stuff works. Not only that, but there doesn't seem to be any additional harshness in the sound.

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Rokovak! That is exactly why I asked the question! I put super glue in a rut my string had dug and it seemed to work, but I wasn't sure if I was missing out on anything the parchment does. Thanks!

iburkard: Thanks I don't have any parchment and I did try to find some locally, but I do have superglue.

Lyndon: Thank you. I don't like the plastic sleeves. I've always thought that originally they were so the string didn't dig into the bridge if you didn't have parchment there, so I guess I'm wrong about that. It is also a subtle mute.

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Rokovak! That is exactly why I asked the question! I put super glue in a rut my string had dug and it seemed to work, but I wasn't sure if I was missing out on anything the parchment does. Thanks!

iburkard: Thanks I don't have any parchment and I did try to find some locally, but I do have superglue.

Lyndon: Thank you. I don't like the plastic sleeves. I've always thought that originally they were so the string didn't dig into the bridge if you didn't have parchment there, so I guess I'm wrong about that. It is also a subtle mute.

I am sure you can find some paper tape in any stationary shop. It's doing the job.

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I'm new so excuse my lack of knowlege but if the bridge wood is too soft for the e-string then what about making a bridge with a small ebony insert? That's my new invention, I think I'll put one on my old fiddle and find out how it sounds.

VB51_sm_.jpg

Prior art. No direct experience with it but have not heard positive opinions from those that do.

ALB

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parchment is just rawhide, could you get the real thin doggie bones and cut a little off? you would have to soak it in water to soften it enough to work with and maybe scrape it thinner if it's too thick. Also pergamena.net specializes in larger size parchement but I think you can get small scraps or samples.

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Funny, I had seen several of these bridges and I thought it was imply a fancy staining to make sure people were using the bridge in the right orientation... :)

I will give a try.

Try these :- http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=200463519214

I have bought these before and they are quite good for the price.

T

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They sell parchment there (expensive)

parchment

You can buy natural Vellum banjo heads - the smallest are about 10" diam. Last you a lifetime and about £10.

They are too thick - but have a nice 'skin' side - and you can shave down the back carefully with a knife or scrape it down.

One small strip cut to width - about 75mm long is the easiest to handle for shaving - and its easy to get it down to a 'translucent' thickness. It works well, as you can adjust the thickness to suit your needs.

I stick them on with Titebond original, thinned slightly with water - tacks fast and sets quite stiff.

stringmail - bottom of page

Geoff

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I always use some form of parchment. I soak it until it is saturated with water, I then squeeze out excess water on some absorbent paper and fix to the bridge using superglue ( cyanoacrylate) I find the parchment dries shrink fit to the bridge top and pre set E string groove.

I always remove the string sleeves that some manufacturers still insist on fitting to the higher strings. These never protect the bridge and invariably cause false notes and whistles.

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Mike:

Some people use something as simple as a paper punch and center the parchment over the string notch or groove. Not sure, but I think the size is random. The ones on my violins are usually elongated rectangles with rounded corners, with the long ends draped over the front and back of the bridge and not wider than about 4 mm. One of the expensive bridges I have is made so the bottoms of it are parallel to the instrument surface, giving it a more finished/well thought out look. Seems like something you can do however you like, as long as they aren't much bigger than what is necessary to where it starts damping the sound of the bridge.

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I cut then at 11mm long - nip off the corners. I judge the width but measure the length. I then mark a pencil dot midway. I stick the lower half first on the back with the dot centred on the notch - and set to hit the top of the bridge. Just put the glue on the bridge and the back half of the patch. I can then press it on exactly in line with the notch. Let that dry a bit - Titebond grabs fast - then glue the rest and fold over tightly. Titebond thinned a bit with water - painted on both faces and left to tack off a bit acts almost like a contact adhesive.

I let it dry hard before stringing up - otherwise the string bites into it while its still a bit soft.

Thinning the parchment into 2 or 3" strips means I can poke the rest of the strip under the string when setting up the string clearance - and its all the same thickness.

We should all get out more really :blink:

Geoff

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The only reason that this thread isn't excited... lack of pictures!

The larger bridge is a viola bridge - has an interesting ebony inlay that does NOT go through to the other side of the bridge. The bridges with four dark tabs have leather applied.

I also included some very old boxwood pegs so that you can see what a nice worn set looks like.

With parchment, I cut a band-aid shape, and use a small clamp to hold it into place while the glue dries.

violinEbridges.jpg

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