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Who is your fav dead maker ?


~ Ben Conover
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A balsalmic comment with a hint of astringency...

This type of thread reminds me of the poll conducted in the UK at the beginning of 2000.

Who is the top musician of the millenium?

Answser: Robbie Williams (of course)

++++++++++++++

Of course, there is always someone left out. I don't like to see people use the word "dead". Once a maker is always a maker ( timeless.)

His work never died.

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The great thing about a "favorite list" is that it is just one person's opinion and there can be all different criteria!

The reason Scarampella is one of my personal favorite makers (and he is at the top of my list) is because 1. his work follows his local tradition and is part of a continuum from Balestrieri to Dal'aglio to Dionelli to him...in other words, it is clearly recognizable as part of a school 2. he had a tremendous varnish 3. I like the unrefined, yet immediate style that comes through 4. most importantly, they sound tremendous (arching, model local wood choice)

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"The Turk". Interesting maker. I've seen one or two of his instruments I thought were very nice. One I recall in particular had an "older feel" to it... and was attributed to a maker that worked well before he did. It sold at a well known brick & mortar auction house as the older maker it was ascribed to.

They must be really rare, if even you have seen only one or two.

Interesting that you comment on the "older feel", this was more or less what I thought when I first saw the violin.

The one that I saw is a Strad model with a beautiful, wide flamed one piece back and a (slightly orange-) brown varnish, that has a slight green tinge under some light. One interesting detail is that the rib miters are painted black.

Thanks for your response,

Matthias

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They must be really rare, if even you have seen only one or two.

I should clarify slightly. Though I've seen more than one or two, I haven't seen many... maybe four or five... but really liked one or two of those I saw. I certainly may have seen others in the past, before I started recognizing the maker, but I think he wasn't terribly prolific (he died pretty young, didn't he?) and I'm pretty sure a number of his instruments went through an "identity change" along the way.

I think Tarisio has a photo of one in their archives that's the type (older looking) I was speaking of. I guess I'd describe him as kind of a quirky maker, not a very refined one, but the quirky details are interesting and seem to work together.

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Michael,said what i was thinking , its more like a who`s who of modern Italian makers with a few foreigners thrown in. I have seen many terrible sounding instruments from some on these lists and i also know that many of these modern Italians have had a regraduation ,along with a few other alterations to get them working.

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Michael,said what i was thinking , its more like a who`s who of modern Italian makers with a few foreigners thrown in. I have seen many terrible sounding instruments from some on these lists and i also know that many of these modern Italians have had a regraduation ,along with a few other alterations to get them working.

Geez...

I simply mentioned names of makers who I thought might be worth consideration and stopped after a few cities in Italy and a US maker. I mentioned that in my post. Some would make it onto my personal favorites list, though some would not. Chris was kind enough to lay out a list of his favorites. He did not say you had to agree.

Why don't you and and Michael offer something constructive? Besides the sin of forgetting the famous maker Antonio Estravaganzza in his gracious reply, I know Michael does like some other makers... Nestor Audinot, for example, though he's stretching the 100 year mark.

Who do you like? Why not add a few more of those foreigners... and I'm sure you know it's not only modern Italians that are modified to fit the modern tastes and market demands... and many (including some modern Italians) would fare just fine with a neck set and a new bar.

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Jeff, when everyone gets a prize, no one has one. Between you and Chris, the two of you covered most of the makers one would commonly see for sale. To me, it sounds more like support for a sales brochure than a selective list of the best. Frankly, I don't see any attempt at all to pick the best. Of the ones named, one of my faves is Ornati. How many first prizes are we giving? Maybe I could drag out a few more, but why? The exercise, as it stands, reminds me of one of my former employer's mantras that went with virtually every sales pitch "This is THE FINEST EXAMPLE of this maker's work we have ever seen!" . . . (until we have the next one for sale).

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Jeff, when everyone gets a prize, no one has one. Between you and Chris, the two of you covered most of the makers one would commonly see for sale. To me, it sounds more like a sales brochure than a selective list of the best. Frankly, I don't see any attempt at all to pick the best. Of the ones named, one of my faves is Ornati. How many first prizes are we giving? Maybe I could drag out a few more, but why?

Usually you read better, Michael. I wasn't awarding prizes.

"I simply mentioned names of makers who I thought might be worth consideration and stopped after a few cities in Italy and a US maker. I mentioned that in my post. Some would make it onto my personal favorites list, though some would not."

What I can't criticize you for, however, is that in a previous post (that seems to have been lost in the software change-over) I mentioned I was interested in sitting back and seeing who others like. At this point, I'll be happy to admit that, from my first list, Fiorini, Ornati (early/middle), Garimberti (early/middle), and Becker would appear on my private list.

post-17-032914600 1287883111_thumb.jpg

Ornati 'cello head

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I'd like to mention the only modern Italians who haven't been named yet: Dispersore di Cucina and his friend Sonoingrado di Vendereche (now that I look him up, his real name might be Posso Venderequello). Otherwise, I think no one's left to name, except possibly some obscure names between the stuck-together pages of some dealers' Henley. . .

Hi Stradofear,

You forgot to mention Massimo Guadagno (translation: maximum profit). :)

The entry in Henley I like the best is Joseph Primavera. Unfortunately I don't have a copy of Henley at the house so I can't post the text.

Bruce

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Michael,

No need to be so cranky. Dean asked me for a list of my top 15, so I did the exercize. In fact, I was a bit surprised about the list because I am actually a fan of the non Italian schools. I realize that the makers from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and England (and your own favorite Frenchman)were in decline by the 20th Century. My list either demonstrates that the cream really does rise to the top, or that I have no imagination. But if you come up with some good names I forgot in your list, I'll willingly amend my list...but no cheating by using reference books!

In light of the valid crticism, I offer my top 6 list of favorite makers in order. This is based on the single best instrument made by the maker in the 20th Century (to my personal taste).

1. S. F.Sacconi

2. Voller Bros

3. S Scarampella

4. V Sannino

5. F Garimberti

6. G. Fiorini

Be warned: If this is in anyway offensive to anyone, please either ignore the thread or, better yet, offer your own list! :)

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Michael,

No need to be so cranky. Dean asked me for a list of my top 15, so I did the exercize. In fact, I was a bit surprised about the list because I am actually a fan of the non Italian schools. I realize that the makers from Hungary, Czechoslovakia, and England (and your own favorite Frenchman)were in decline by the 20th Century. My list either demonstrates that the cream really does rise to the top, or that I have no imagination. But if you come up with some good names I forgot in your list, I'll willingly amend my list...but no cheating by using reference books!

In light of the valid crticism, I offer my top 6 list of favorite makers in order. This is based on the single best instrument made by the maker in the 20th Century (to my personal taste).

1. S. F.Sacconi

2. Voller Bros

3. S Scarampella

4. V Sannino

5. F Garimberti

6. G. Fiorini

Be warned: If this is in anyway offensive to anyone, please either ignore the thread or, better yet, offer your own list! :)

Would you name some that are your favorites from the other schools? French, Hungarian, Czech, and English? I promise I won't bite. :)

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I'd like to mention the only modern Italians who haven't been named yet: Dispersore di Cucina and his friend Sonoingrado di Vendereche (now that I look him up, his real name might be Posso Venderequello). Otherwise, I think no one's left to name, except possibly some obscure names between the stuck-together pages of some dealers' Henley. . .

I'd like to nominate this post as POTY (post of the year)!

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Giuseppe Fiorini made great instruments indeed. His golden yellow/orange varnish is gorgeous.

I had the oportunity to study Hartmut Rohde's G. Fiorini viola - that is in mint condition - and it is a fantastic instrument. I found curious that he mended the purfling strip in the back with a rather blunt and quite visible joint, but that just added more charm to the instrument.

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Because in addition to being true, it has the added bonus of sharp acerbic wit. The same cannot be said of your brute force bridge fitting video.

Gosh, maybe I'm just too easy to please, but the mentioned video I thought was a masterpiece of dead-panning, as well as being a quite inoffensive yet graphic dis of some "alternative" methods.

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