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daddy-o496

Oil varnish recommendation.

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I would like some recommendations for commercially available oil varnish. The varnish that I have been using is relatively inexpensive and when buffed up to a gloss, it kinda resembles plastic. I would like to know what varnish you use and where I can get some. I am an amateur builder and would like to upgrade to a nicer varnish. Thanx, daddy-o496.

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You don't say what you are using ? It also depends how you are polishing/buffing ?

Tripoli can be used with water rather than oil - and gives a duller finish that responds well to a final polish with boiled linseed oil, or any other drying oil.

You can also give a final polish with the varnish itself with a bit a oil added. Then don't touch it again - let it settle and dry as it is.

I think you will find most cheaper varnishes much of a muchness as you already have. So much of varnishing is in the application - and different treatments of the final coats can make a big difference. Don't be afraid to try 'spiking' standard varnishes with extra oil or rosin oil, spike oil. larch etc - but try it out first.

The truth is its very difficult to get a good oil varnish that suits ones needs - thats why so many make their own !

Apart form the obvious 'big' names - there are also Trad Tonewoods- and in the UK, NRI - never tried either though.

Geoff

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I think this IVC varnish is the Hammerl one that also can be found here: https://www.joha.eu/shop/en/

Don't know if daddy-o496 is here in Europe or not. Check for the shipping costs and decide.

I have used the Hammerl varnish with very good results.

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I would like some recommendations for commercially available oil varnish. The varnish that I have been using is relatively inexpensive and when buffed up to a gloss, it kinda resembles plastic. I would like to know what varnish you use and where I can get some. I am an amateur builder and would like to upgrade to a nicer varnish. Thanx, daddy-o496.

I am curious - what have you been using? Most any varnish will look like plastic when buffed to a gloss.

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Frankly, I would be amazed if you could detect 'large' differences between any of the many varnishes available if you apply the same standardized finishing process. This goes for SPAR to Magister to home cooked.

The main problems will be ease of application, intensity of colour and, horror of horrors, durability.

Glossiness is your technique.

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I am a newbe to varnish and can see lots of room for learning the science and developing better technique. that said IMHO

I used the cheaper IV Varnish w/ Gamboge filler sealer stain for my first 5 it does have a sertian opaque thickness and plastic quality but I was very happy with It........ then I posted here and found /

Joe Robsons' formulas (thanks all) and used them on #6&7 (just recently finished! I will post pics for comment soon ) I could have used more color in earlier applications/ lots of little thing add up. I found Joe's ground fun & easy with a quality of age and texture apparent .The greek pitch varnish I found needed a more skillfull aproche than the IV product/however I found the texture and clarity to be hands down better suited to my personal goals. We'll see how the next 300 years treats it (lucky for me I'm a buddist!).

It seems that almost any varnish can produce a mirror finish/ the question becomes how long does it last & how does it fair. Do you want to see yourself every time you look at your violin /or see the violin?

You can tell a master violin maker .....

but you can't tell em very much !

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'' For those who've used the Hammerl varnish from IVC, did you find that you needed to thin it to make it brushable? ''

The Hammerl Joha oil varnish from GEWA product I've used needs no thinning but you gotta get it on pretty fast.

It gets tacky after about 5 minutes or so.

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'' For those who've used the Hammerl varnish from IVC, did you find that you needed to thin it to make it brushable? ''

It depends which coat you are doing. I use a the "pointed toothpick" test for viscosity. Dip the toothpick into the varnish and it should be thinned with balsamic turpentine so that a drop will fall easily from the end of the toothpick. If an oil varnish is applied too thickly it will take several times as long to dry.

For each subsequent coat I add a few more drops of cold pressed linseed oil to the varnish to increase the oil ratio following the "fat over lean" recommendation for finishing coats. I have used Hammerl varnish and seems to dry quite readily. I assume that it must have some "driers" added to it. I have some Masic varnish that I bought years ago from an art store and it takes much longer to dry than the IVC varnish.

I let the last coat dry for at least 3 weeks before I do the final polishing and setup.

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For those who've used the Hammerl varnish from IVC, did you find that you needed to thin it to make it brushable?

Not at all. But I don't use a traditional brush but a foam brush. This has the advantage over the traditional brush that is easier to spread and also you can use the foam to wipe if you put too much varnish.

Thanks for the tips. Is the three week drying time on the last coat with or without light box?

With Hammerl varnish I have found that 48 hours in the UV box (mine has four 20 watts BL tubes) is great between coats and three weeks is enough for the last coat.

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Frankly, I would be amazed if you could detect 'large' differences between any of the many varnishes available if you apply the same standardized finishing process. This goes for SPAR to Magister to home cooked.

The main problems will be ease of application, intensity of colour and, horror of horrors, durability.

Glossiness is your technique.

I think you are on to something here.. most samples of nearly anything brushed onto glass slides look alike so far as gloss is concerned. (That is, the samples are not rubbed down) The film-building material itself can either be an alcohol-soluable solution or some kind of polymerizing substance with oils and resins.

Can anyone suggest how some kinds of differences could be made to give a wide range of outcomes.... just on glass slides?

Glass is wonderful to work on, by the way. Most small hardware stores fit window glass for customers. There will be a bin full of scrap (free). Buy a glasscutter ($4). I cut up 3x5" pieces and always have a bunch of them. Many markers and pens will write under where you brush a sample. Nice and permentent. Just a date and number along with a computer diary. You can keep them for years with no confusion at all.

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It depends which coat you are doing. I use a the "pointed toothpick" test for viscosity. Dip the toothpick into the varnish and it should be thinned with balsamic turpentine so that a drop will fall easily from the end of the toothpick. If an oil varnish is applied too thickly it will take several times as long to dry.

For each subsequent coat I add a few more drops of cold pressed linseed oil to the varnish to increase the oil ratio following the "fat over lean" recommendation for finishing coats. I have used Hammerl varnish and seems to dry quite readily. I assume that it must have some "driers" added to it. I have some Masic varnish that I bought years ago from an art store and it takes much longer to dry than the IVC varnish.

I let the last coat dry for at least 3 weeks before I do the final polishing and setup.

Pls tell me the meaning of "fat over lean".

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Pls tell me the meaning of "fat over lean".

With oil painting it's better to build up layers of paint from the thin lean primer to the thicker oily layers. This lessens cracking.

For the the opposite effect like where you might want to induce to some cracking, you can use lean over fat, like a thin spirit varnish over a semi dry oil varnish.....

Cheers.

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