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I don't know, but the condition of the varnish and of the instrument is remarkable. This instrument has passed the modern restoration and polishing era untouched, and there are very few instruments like that. And of course the guy who got it knows what he got.

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I don't know, but the condition of the varnish and of the instrument is remarkable. This instrument has passed the modern restoration and polishing era untouched, and there are very few instruments like that. And of course the guy who got it knows what he got.

That makes at least two people who at least thought they knew. The winning bidder didn't get there by himself.

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Tarisio's description of the fiddle is "late 19th century," meaning 1870+, I would think.

Looking at the images (and I stress "images") it's hard to believe this fiddle isn't older than 140 years. Assuming that Tarisio was correct in dating the instrument as late 19th century, Tarisio must have seen something to make it believe it isn't as old as it looks.

Maybe the buyer thought it is as old as it looks.

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Based on discontinuous flame, there has been mischief in the button area. The varnish on the scroll looks cheap factory.

I would buy an Aston Martin (or at least 11 of the 12 pistons), for that price.

There must be something, I can't see it. Perhaps it's a dream playing fiddle, but who would buy it for that money unless they were sure

they could get papers for it.

I am always surprised how different fiddles look from their photos, did anyone see this fiddle in the flesh so to speak?

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Venetian, 18thC, probably Gofriller shop.

I was so intrigued by lot 345, I missed this one, Darn.

Glenn

And you would pay $100K for it (modern neck with no obvious graft + button damage +...)?

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ps I must correct my earlier post. 100K would only buy ~ 7 of the 12 pistons of the AM I lust for.

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And you would pay $100K for it (modern neck with no obvious graft + button damage +...)?

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ps I must correct my earlier post. 100K would only buy ~ 7 of the 12 pistons of the AM I lust for.

The neck is obviously grafted into the pegbox, which has been replaced (volute graft). This explains the "cheap" looking varnish on the pegbox, too.

Venetian 18th Century sounds like a reasonable guess to me. However the buyer must have had more information and a good reason to pay 100K, I think.

Matthias

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The neck is obviously grafted into the pegbox, which has been replaced (volute graft). This explains the "cheap" looking varnish on the pegbox, too.

I agree the the flame pattern of the scroll looks rather different to that ouf the neck, but I am not totally convinced because I cannot see an obvious discontinuity in the grain pattern where the 'graft' line is. Taking the G peg out and looking at the hole would provide a definitive answer.

On another Forum someone used the following terminology "violins realized by famous liuthier". Perhaps in this case it might be modified to "violin realized somewhere near a famous luthier".

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Sorry, I meant to say on the top plate.

Hi Ron,

You're right. There is something going on there but it looks original to me. There are clearly two hands at work here not counting the restorers, so I think the discontinuity you noticed was to correct a mistake in cutting the purfling channel.

I expect you were more interested in the Reindahls. I notice you certified one of them.

Glenn

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In my opinion, that was made by Giuseppe Dal'aglio of Mantua, early 19th C. It needs a big restoration. Obviously, the bidders thought it was better, but I am confounded as to what they think it is. I can only guess Balestrieri or Storioni...go figure.

Chris,

If that is your opinion, enquiring minds will ask why it was described as late 19thC.

Glenn

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Storioni was a name that came to my mind also...

Never heard also about Ludovico Bergonzi. Why a label with the name of an unknown maker would be put inside the instrument?

I think Ludovico ( or perhaps also spelled Lodovico ) was a maker in Cremona about 1740. He was a cousin of Michael Angelo Bergonzi ( who was the son of Carlo who worked in the shop of Stradivari )

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Glenn,

I am no longer responsible for Tarisio descriptions. I sold my interest in the company a year ago and remain as a consultant only. They never asked me about this one...(it probably sold for more as a "sleeper' anyway!) :)

Chris

Yes, the spelling in Italian is "Lodovico", I will give a look in my books to see if I find something about him.
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