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What is so great about the "Scott Cao Sound"?


WesRist
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I have to admit it, I like his instruments...at least over the internet,

but I haven't been exposed much to them personally.

Could someone who's either played them or owned them elaborate

on what the sound is like on the ones they've heard, and specifically

what they thought was so 'great'? What makes them better than others?

Thanks!

Wes

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Which instruments? Factory, workshop, hand-made by him? Violin, viola, cello? I can't imagine all these categories would share some unique sound characteristic. I have a workshop Scott Cao cello. If mine is any indication then the unique Scott Cao characteristic would be of a vicious wolf note.

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Which instruments? Factory, workshop, hand-made by him? Violin, viola, cello? I can't imagine all these categories would share some unique sound characteristic. I have a workshop Scott Cao cello. If mine is any indication then the unique Scott Cao characteristic would be of a vicious wolf note.

+++++++++++++

I have heard a lot of people saying good sound of Scott Cao. I too personally do not know much about

Scott Cao violin. I only play violins.

If you want to spend serious money to buy a violin, you should try whatever other say good. Why not?

Comparison is the only way.

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If you are serious about buying a good violin then go to a shop and play every one they have and see what you like. The only reason to concentrate on branding is if you plan on buying online and all you have to go on is the name. When you go to the shop, I'd suggest ignoring the label completely and ignore the price until you've got down to a few candidates that you like.

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If you are serious about buying a good violin then go to a shop and play every one they have and see what you like. The only reason to concentrate on branding is if you plan on buying online and all you have to go on is the name. When you go to the shop, I'd suggest ignoring the label completely and ignore the price until you've got down to a few candidates that you like.

+++++++++++++

Given what knowledge I have in violins, I would buy a reasonable priced violin (old or new) which

I can fix it to become a better violin. That is, the violin brand is quite well known somehow it does not work like

up to par. There are many violins like that, a violin has potential. Come to the forum learn how to make it better.

Yes, it is possible. Don't expect a lot of experts hold your hands so quickly. :) but some will.

For example. the right side violin has potential. (good wood, good graduation, good varnish).

post-5682-1285716794_thumb.jpg

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+++++++++++++

Given what knowledge I have in violins, I would buy a reasonable priced violin (old or new) which

I can fix it to become a better violin. That is, the violin brand is quite well known somehow it does not work like

up to par. There are many violins like that, a violin has potential. Come to the forum learn how to make it better.

Yes, it is possible. Don't expect a lot of experts hold your hands so quickly. :) but some will.

For example. the right side violin has potential. (good wood, good graduation, good varnish).

If I had the violin on the right, I would gladly trade it for the one on the left, minus the waffle chin rest.

Scott

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If I had the violin on the right, I would gladly trade it for the one on the left, minus the waffle chin rest.

Scott

++++++++++++

" Don't expect every expert hold your hands" I said. :)

Seriously, the violin on right side has good wood. Some German luthiers who worked for a commercial

factory, such as Roth co. picked out the wood and spent half hour in varnishing before letting his apprentice take over.

No one really had asked the luthier. You can imagine he was busy with other things and would not have time to answer

any question. Was happy to be left alone. If he had anything to say to the apprentice . I think it ought to be" Hey, son, don't

varnish any more . It was enough." :) The varnih is clear as Lake Michigan water.

post-5682-1285765635_thumb.jpg

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Actually, I am not. That's not the topic of this thread.

I just wanted to know what others like about the sound of his instruments.

+++++++++++

I know too your asked that question.

The problem is that how anyone can describe it if he or she had played a Scott Cao violin.

First, you need to comapare with some other know brand and assuming the brand name set up a typical sound.

For example, if you pick a Roth violin to compaore , then what Roths? The name has different grades. EH Roth the best could cost $6k and

cheap Roth could be $150, many in between.

Second, the set up could be different. A good violin with bad set up or a bad violin with a good set up. In term of sound alone is confusing.

All boil down to what you have experienced and of you feel of a certain violin. The fact I saw a few Scott Cao were sold quite quickly in the market

it may mean something, but again why they were for sale in the first place (private sales)? One prospective is in fact against another. I had tried $15k violin too, it did not impress me

as the price. $250K violin I did not even want to pick it up for fear of dropping it. What is the point?

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Every time a potential customer locates me on the Scott Cao "Dealers" web site, all they care about is the name on the label and getting it for a rock-bottom price. Once someone gets the bug planted in their ear they get on the website and call every Scott Cao dealer from here to Timbuktu looking for the cheapest price. I've long since given up trying to please label-conscious bottom feeders, as they usually don't have realistic expectations in the first place. These days I focus on selling at fair-market prices to local, service/value conscious customers rather than trying to win over cross-country discount shoppers. It saves me much aggravation.

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Then you should ask the players on the Fingerboard

But the site explicitely says about that forum:

"The Fingerboard is focused on discussions relating to string instrument playing, practicing, technique, recent performances you've given or heard, the best CD of a particular piece and so on."

Whereas the Pegbox is for:

"This forum is for discussions relating to the “hardware” side of string instruments"

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++++++++++++

" Don't expect every expert hold your hands" I said. :)

Seriously, the violin on right side has good wood. Some German luthiers who worked for a commercial

factory, such as Roth co. picked out the wood and spent half hour in varnishing before letting his apprentice take over.

No one really had asked the luthier. You can imagine he was busy with other things and would not have time to answer

any question. Was happy to be left alone. If he had anything to say to the apprentice . I think it ought to be" Hey, son, don't

varnish any more . It was enough." :) The varnih is clear as Lake Michigan water.

I'm a big fan of trying violins in multiple shops. Consumer Reports cannot guide you in the selection of

a good violin. There are a number of factory instruments that I find consistant and playable. There can

be a "ringer " in the batch. I play the game "Which violin would I buy today?" price and label are irrelevant

at first. What do I like? Then I look for a bargain in my price range $1800-3000. Choices are pretty competitive.

criteria in order are sound, condition, appearance, maker and investment potential. If I got this backwards

I've got something I dislike playing and could be costly to fix.

Would I run to the checkout or would I continue to sift? Does the dealer have a large enough inventory?

What was the best they had and what was it's standing among the best I've tried? It doesn't hurt to walk

away empty handed and it is great experience trying numerous instruments.

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But the site explicitely says about that forum:

"The Fingerboard is focused on discussions relating to string instrument playing, practicing, technique, recent performances you've given or heard, the best CD of a particular piece and so on."

Whereas the Pegbox is for:

"This forum is for discussions relating to the “hardware” side of string instruments"

Yes. Thats why you'll get a better answer there, but do what you want.

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I have to admit it, I like his instruments...at least over the internet,

but I haven't been exposed much to them personally.

Could someone who's either played them or owned them elaborate

on what the sound is like on the ones they've heard, and specifically

what they thought was so 'great'? What makes them better than others?

Thanks!

Wes

Sorry I dont have a"Scott" my nephew does, it sounds great. He just upgraded.

Do you want to play the instrument? Do you want to speculate on an instruments

value increase? I would repeat what has been posted. Try as many instruments

that are close to your budget, and , a little beyond. Choose 3-5 that you like.

Get your teacher or friend to play them while your back is turned. When you

and your ear select the same instrument pay the price. You will never regret.

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I don't know who Scott Cao is and have no idea what his instruments sound like.

However, one guy I know told me my fiddles sound great and if only I could make them look better....

To be honest I'd rather he said they just looked great, because that's the difficult bit.

Sound is a product of design.

Looks play more part in the sale than most people ever imagine.

The 'bla bla' sound......the 'gothic look' etc, they are just terms used to market, and not necessarily accurate or valid descriptions.

The 'Strad' sound ? No, Strads don't all sound the same.

I have no idea what my next viola will sound like, and if my Cello sound good I'll be very happy.

If someone has a particular 'sound', they are probably a production maker with very little variety or creativity in their design and process. I can think of at least one example who shall remain nameless.

Cheers.

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