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Alfieri

Violin E string adjuster

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Can someone plesae help me to choose the right string adjuster, only for E string ??

What type is the best ??

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Use just one "perfect peg" about $20 ( $ 85 for a set of four). Why? It will do the job as an ordinary fine tuner but

its weight is to be on the peg box. Don't listen to the traditionists who may object to anything non-tradiational without bother

trying. I learn my lesson but look back how much good things I have missed, If you don't like it you can always go back.

As you original question asked, I would choose the one which can hold a ball end e string. Why? save you money. E tuner cut the e string easily.

It will shorten the e string life if you use a loop type e string. Some traditional tuners are hard to turn only look good on your violin.

Another solution is to use a built-in tuner tailpeiee (wittner). Ask people who has used it if they are happy ( iam happy). I have built-in tuner tailpeice

and pefection pegs on my (different) violins ( but each works out just fine) And single e tuner also. Only thing gets me mad is the loop type e string combined

with the sharp hook of e single tuner. Reason is obvious.

The truth of the matter is that only one tuner is actually needed, e tuner. A biult-in tuner tailpiece helps if the pegs of G D A are not very good.

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too heavy...wrong angles too.

It may be heavier than the Hill style single prong, and it doesn't bring the string down to the tailpiece fret as closely as the Hill single prong does. It might be worth weighing both this one and the Hill single prong to see if it actually is heavier. The Hill single prong has a block of metal on the underside of the tailpiece which is absent in this 2 prong.

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The original Hill tuner had a small flat metal accessory that slipped over the hook of the tuner and at the other end had a curved bend with a hole drilled through it so that you could use a ball end string.

Personally, I have tried the same e-string with or without this small accessory and although it shortens the afterlength I was not able to perceive any acoustic change to the instrument, nor could the players who tried it.

Bruce

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In the photo of Isaac Stern's Panette del Gesu, on the 2010 The Strad calendar, March, the E string uses exactly the device Bruce is referring to, above. That would be a way of dealing with a ball end string and Hill style single prong tuner. If it was good enough for the Panette, maybe the device deserves serious consideration.

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D'addario sells "ball-end adapters" that reflect the design of those Hill adapter things, that are meant to be used with Wittner's Hill-style fine tuners.

I personally use Gotz fine tuners, I used to have them on the A and E (I used a Larsen steel A-string, which has an easily removable ball) but now I just use it on the E. For a while, I used a custom Harmonie tailpiece that had fine tuners on the A string and E string, but when I stopped using steel A strings, I had it taken off and put on a regular tailpiece with a Gotz tuner on the E. The Harmonie is a beautiful piece of work and I'm considering having it put on my next violin; my only complaint about it is that the A and E strings don't touch the fret when the (removable) fine tuners are installed in the tailpiece, resulting in an incorrect afterlength for the E and A strings.

I prefer Gotz over Wittner since the threads don't jam as easily (or in my case, ever). When I used to use Wittner tuners, the threads would stop working as well after only a couple months in use, resisting all my effects to clean or lubricate them. Also, the Gotz are better made, and don't split the loops of strings like Wittner hill-style tuners are notorious for doing.

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It may be heavier than the Hill style single prong, and it doesn't bring the string down to the tailpiece fret as closely as the Hill single prong does. It might be worth weighing both this one and the Hill single prong to see if it actually is heavier. The Hill single prong has a block of metal on the underside of the tailpiece which is absent in this 2 prong.

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I have a few of these...you might be correct re the weight, what you say makes sense. I never used them because the tailpiece seemed to sit awkwardly with one fitted ( to E string).

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The UNI hook sits up so high above the tailpiece that in order for the four strings to find static equilibrium the tailpiece is twisted further downward on the e-string side and upward on the g-string side. This is not the case with the standard Hill tuner.

Bruce

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I have a few of these...you might be correct re the weight, what you say makes sense. I never used them because the tailpiece seemed to sit awkwardly with one fitted ( to E string).

Melvin,

Bruce seems to agree with you. I wonder if the twisting problem would be less if this 2 pronged tuner were being used on the A string, and not the E. The E, I assume, would have the Hill single prong tuner.

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tailpiece.jpgfsvengeheh1fside.jpg

I think this tailpieces with titanium fine tuners ( string adjuster ) could be the best choice, but it is very expensive.

The prongs look like they sit pretty high off the surface of the tailpiece, as high as the two pronged UNI tuner in question. If the prongs on these tailpieces are as high as they look (and it's hard to tell from these photos), then you'd probably want all four fine tuners, and not just one on the E string. With four, you'd avoid the tailpiece twisting noted earlier.

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My harmonie tailpiece looks pretty similar to the boxwood tailpiece pictured, with the two integrated fine tuners; since the strings are lifted higher than the tailpiece fret, there is twisting present

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Not a maker. Not even much of a player. But my 2 cents: The Hill type tuner is the most compact, the most aesthetic. File down the rough edge and put a little candle wax on the screw and it works just fine without endangering the belly or adding much weight.

I tried the "protective" plastic gizmos and found them not worth the bother.

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I've been using the durhill type single prong on my work, after breaking E strings I did as Guy susgested and filled the inside curve, then hit it with some fine grit sandpaper rolled up, 1200 I think ,and ...no more broken strings. I like the sexy look of the durhill ...the least rube goldburg looking I've seen and they don't cost more that the fiddle it's self. I will try the wax. thanks.

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My conclusion is that the best choice is the hill type, but when we use only one steel string ( E string ), the problem is when we have the steel A string ...

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Someone at my school has one of those Dov Schmidt ones, for cello, we all thought it was a Harmonie until a luthier took off his tailpiece and saw that it wasn't one; he said that the quality was still impeccable, however.

I have a boxwood Harmonie hill-style tailpiece for violin.. it was very good when I had it on, but when I switched instruments, I had a set of Crowson fittings put on my new violin, because I no longer used a steel A string (so I no longer needed the second fine tuner).

My complaint about it was that the A and E strings never crossed over the saddle of the tailpiece, although the people at B&H claimed that at least the A string should have...

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Since this thread I resurrected is regarding e-tuners, I took some photos of a violin I'm setting up to show how I like to install the tuner. The maple shim is added to allow the tuner to be fit to the tailpiece and increases the travel of the tuner arm on thinner tailpieces. The upper portion of the string slot is lengthened and the fret is notched to further increase the travel of the tuner arm.

I'd still like to know who makes that tailpiece if anyone knows. Cheers,

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