Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

A Bow Makes A Big Difference?


Fellow
 Share

Recommended Posts

I do mostly lower-end work when it comes to repairs and such, simply because that's what people have over here. Nevertheless, I do have the odd unexpected "encounter" with something out of the ordinary once in a while.

A violin bow I rehaired quite some time ago really grabbed my attention both tonally and how it handled when I tried it out on a violin, despite my violin-playing skills being very basic. I can't identify bows and didn't even bother to look for a stamp. The owner subsequently informed me that it was a Sartory. That experience inspired me to examine and try out bows in for rehair with much more attention.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone on here said I wasn't scientific. You're right. But, I am a bow maker and a player, so yes I can tell the difference and yes I know what I am talking about. It might be wise not to make uninformed statements such as this. If these forums are to be helpful to anyone, we should try to be civil about it.

There is a scientific/mechanical approach and an artistic approach and often a combination of both towards making. Each has its own merit and limitations.

So, what we are saying here are our opinions, nothing more. However, I assume that these opinions are based off of both knowledge and experience.

I am not saying CF is not the way to go. I think every serious musician should have a CF bow. However, I work with many professional musicians and though they use CF bows, they are always either a backup or their outdoor performance bow. Why? Simply because they do not have the same properties as a good pernambuco bow. This is why CF cannot replace pernambuco. It does not mean that it never will replace it, but at least for now, no manufactureers of CF bows have come up with one that can.

There is nothing mystical about this, just a little experience and common sense.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's also a matter of perspective as well as experience and playing ability. I've told this story before and most don't like it, but I once had a bow made of hickory (of all things) from the mountains of Virginia. I should point out that this was a well made thing, not just a mountain stick. It was the best playing bow I've ever owned. Beautiful sound and balance, and fine adhesion to the string.

This was a fluke of course and I've never seen another like it, and I wouldn't buy another alternative wood bow today, but I think it speaks to the craftsmanship of the maker, aside from the quality and type of materials used. And with quality pernambuco becoming rarer every day, perhaps it's something to keep in mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

it has been my impression that the most ignorant people in the violin business are the most technically minded, violin and bow making is an art, no way to quantify that, sincerely lyndon

I think I wear more than one hat. I am not a foreigner to the art aspects. But I don't inflate myself as an artist. I do my best with workmanship and aesthetics. Just because one has technical opinions does not mean they cannot be artistic. Look at Leonardo da Vinci. Edward Teller was an accomplished pianist.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Someone on here said I wasn't scientific. You're right. But, I am a bow maker and a player, so yes I can tell the difference and yes I know what I am talking about. It might be wise not to make uninformed statements such as this. If these forums are to be helpful to anyone, we should try to be civil about it.

It was my posting. You insisted that science had no role in this discussion. I called you an ignoramus in so many words.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Osage orange is certainly a possible bow wood.

But also look a Hickory, famous for springiness and

ease of bending.

And Mesquite, another bean tree. And more abundant than Pernambuco.

All woods that are much lighter. Will require rather different dimensions.

So far good bow materials have been rather dense.

Can we make a really good bow with lighter materials ??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As far as I am concerned, a bow is much more difficult to select than a violin. There is just something about a bow that is so individual and I find they vary considerably, throughout the price range.

As for carbon fiber, I play a bow made of such, simply because I cannot afford a wood bow with the qualities I seek (I find that in my price range I can get a carbon fiber bow that is, all things considered, better than wood). However, once one raises the bar with regard to cost, wood begins to eclipse carbon fiber, and in a HUGE way. I've played a few wood bows I have liked, and a far fewer still I have loved (my favorite of which was not for sale, at any price). Some day I'll have a wood bow in my case, but not yet today...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...