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What Is A Spiral Bushing?

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Hi all,

FD has mentioned in a thread "Spiral bushing" and he likes it a lot. What is it? How it can be done ?

Just want to know. I thought bushing is bushing. :) Thank you in advance.

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A spiral bushing is a bushing made by wrapping some thin material, usually a wood shaving, around a tapered form (in a spiral) then gluing it in the peg hole.

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The same method is used when repairing dowel connections on furniture... very handy.

Time to buy a plane!

+++++++++

A plane. are you kidding?

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Do you know the kind of damage that you could do with a plane? :)

672-7050.gif

++++++++++++

I thought you were talking " airplane" sometime we it plane .

A plane (tool) can only make a flat surface, right? A flat surface is not what we want in making violin.

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Yuen, this is a simple procedure.

You can easily do it with your hammer, screwdriver, dulled cutting instrument,

tape measure, thumb tacks, balled up twine, sorghum glue, fish paste, fence jack,

tattoo ink caddy, mitre box cozy, left-handed bacon stretcher, and pencil.

GO FOR IT! :) :) :)B) B)

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++++++++++++

A plane (tool) can only make a flat surface, right? A flat surface is not what we want in making violin.

There are rounded thumb planes and gouges for scooping out wood.

There are also many flat surfaces on a violin (almost every glued area), so a flat plane is useful.

You should buy a real plane though... erh.

airplane432.jpg

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Do you know the kind of damage that you could do with a plane? :)

672-7050.gif

I had to use those on my first violin .Took longer to get it to work then it took to build the violin :)

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There are rounded thumb planes and gouges for scooping out wood.

There are also many flat surfaces on a violin (almost every glued area), so a flat plane is useful.

You should buy a real plane though... erh.

airplane432.jpg

++++++++++++++++

Fix the wing ?? :) I bet the pilot , doing such a bad job, or having had too much martini, would be fired

Everyone has to do a job this day. If you cannot do a good spiral bushng job, rather not to do it at all. :)

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++++++++++++++++

Fix the wing ?? :) I bet the pilot , doing such a bad job, or having had too much martini, would be fired

Everyone has to do a job this day. If you cannot do a good spiral bushng job, rather not to do it at all. :)

You don't need a bad day or a martini to do this, only heavy crosswind gusts when landing.

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I make spiral bushing from kraft, mulberry or other reinforced paper or tyvek in the fixture pictured below, then install them as I would any bushing.

The fixture is made of Delrin

The holes made with my reamer

The plugs shaped on my peg shaver.

The dark object is a completed bushing ready to install

Oded

post-95-1275498237.jpg

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I make spiral bushing from kraft, mulberry or other reinforced paper or tyvek in the fixture pictured below, then install them as I would any bushing.

The fixture is made of Delrin

The holes made with my reamer

The plugs shaped on my peg shaver.

The dark object is a completed bushing ready to install

Oded

++++++++++

Great idea. Even a person like me can understand. I thought it has to be hard wood.

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Oded's method looks very good, though I've never tried it.

I use something similar to Oded's method. I find that kraft paper spiral bushings end up being quite visible as the paper darkens when it absorbs the touch-up varnish. A prefer plain maple shavings which I collect from woodshows from people demonstrating Lee Valley planes.

I use a waxed fiberglass or wooden tapered rod as my bushing template trimmed by my peg shaver.

I layout about a 2" maple shaving, a small piece of wax paper and a piece of scotch tape - sticky side up.

I brush the maple shaving with diluted yellow carpenter's glue ... (like glazing an egg roll)

Roll the shaving around the tapered rod.

Then roll the wax paper around the shaving

Then roll the tape around the wax paper.

Gently twist the bushing off the tapered rod and set it aside to dry

then repeat ..

I usually make about 20 at a time of different diameters sizes .. it all depends where you start rolling the shaving. These bushings are only about 3 or 4 turns thick and virtually invisible especially if you slightly ream the bushing after.

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I make spiral bushing from kraft, mulberry or other reinforced paper or tyvek in the fixture pictured below, then install them as I would any bushing.

The fixture is made of Delrin

The holes made with my reamer

The plugs shaped on my peg shaver.

The dark object is a completed bushing ready to install

Oded

Oded,

Are you using Tyvek envelope material?

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I use something similar to Oded's method....

Do use any type of outside form the way Oded does? If not, are there any tricks for winding your shavings tightly on the mandrel?

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I make spiral bushing from kraft, mulberry or other reinforced paper or tyvek in the fixture pictured below, then install them as I would any bushing.

The fixture is made of Delrin

The holes made with my reamer

The plugs shaped on my peg shaver.

The dark object is a completed bushing ready to install

I do them almost exactly the same way, right down to the Delrin mandrels. I'll glue them in place while they are still flexible, and keep compression on them with the mandrel - I have several, so doing a whole pegbox in one sitting is easy.

I usually use Kraft paper, and I like to work next to a sink so I can keep rinsing the glue my fingers. I just keep rolling them until they are tight. They seem a lot better reinforcement for a weak peg box than end-grain bushings, and IME, they are faster and easier.

Always, when I do touch-up, I seal the surface first, so the bushings don't absorb color. They are very thin and virtually disappear with minimal touch-up.

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Currently I'm using archival Tyvek which comes in two thicknesses. It's very compatible with hide glue which I prefer.

~OK

Oded,

Are you using Tyvek envelope material?

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Whew. Just got done warming up the sole of the jack plane on a piece of neck block offcut, and there is a basket of shavings waiting. Question: I have used yellow Titebond on brown paper, and hot hide glue for maple curls and boxwood end grain. Is there any reason to change the choice of glue there?

This time it will only be the large holes, since I am converting an older one to modern taper, if that matters.

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