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Fellow

How To Save A Sinking Island ?

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Hi all,

I have a violin of which one island of lower f-hole sinking, other side, raising. Why?

I gather that the previois repair person distorted the top plate,or the back plate, when glued

so it has this problem. Would you think so? Now, how to undo it?

Looks like the previous luthier installed a new bassbar and distorted the plate, ie, the top

plate was no longer on one plane. He forced the plate to fit the ribs, so the island sinking? right?

The bassbar is so strange and big, I wish I have a pic to show you. Another puzzle. Luthiers are adventurous people.

(which is meritious) Thank you. (sorry being so annoying)

post-5682-1274615471.jpg

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Yuen, What in the name of God are you doing in that picture? :)

++++++++

I thought, it is self-explanatory. The island (peninsula ) of the part of f-hole is sinking.

If my attempt of saving it from sinking does not work. I have to let it go. (do nothing, is what I meant)

Re-doing the bassbar is not my choice yet. I guess the supper huge bassbar was installed to

counter the tension of steel strings. It was overboard idea. It had a reason. The intermediate problem

for me is to take a pic inside (fialed). I only can come up with a drawing.

post-5682-1274626197.jpg

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I have to agree that your photo is confusing. What are you trying to achieve? Are you pushing the wing down?! Can you draw arrows showing which direction sinking or raising is occurring?

Did you set the sound post yourself? Could it be too tight, causing the wing to raise, or the 'island' to sink?

Also, the bar that you drew does seem false/hacked in, and would need to be replaced. But, if the wood is thick enough, it should stop the top from sinking.

Also, you do not need to make multiple topics concerning one violin. Help keep us focused with one post, listing all of your observations, so that we can give better/informed advice.

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Refer to your copy of Weisshaar & Shipman. The book will show you just about everything that you need to know about correcting arching problems, and installing a new bass bar.

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Refer to your copy of Weisshaar & Shipman. The book will show you just about everything that you need to know about correcting arching problems, and installing a new bass bar.

+++++++++

Amazon's quote is $265.00. I am sure it is a good book for someone who is really serious about doing repair work.

My interest in violin is to understand the problem. If I shop a used violin I would know what to avoid. I use broken violins to learn

"repair" basically try my hands in wood working, such as glueing, sanding, clampings. It is a satisfying hobby.

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You're in a big city with lots of resources. I'm sure a copy of the book can be found in a library near you. Interlibrary loans can probably be arranged.

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"My interest in violin is to understand the problem. If I shop a used violin I would know what to avoid. I use broken violins to learn

"repair" basically try my hands in wood working, such as glueing, sanding, clampings. It is a satisfying hobby."

Just think of how much more satisfying it would be if you look up the information yourself to really understand the problems, and do the repairs correctly! $300 is dirt cheap for someone who wants to do as much work on instruments as you do.

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Looks like a job for the Army Corps of Engineers.

I think this sort of thing happens when the soundpost is too long, and over time the top distorts. The peninsula isn't sinking, the adjacent land mass is experiencing tectonic lift making the peninsula appear to be sinking.

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Looks like a job for the Army Corps of Engineers.

I think this sort of thing happens when the soundpost is too long, and over time the top distorts. The peninsula isn't sinking, the adjacent land mass is experiencing tectonic lift making the peninsula appear to be sinking.

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Upon careful examination the land mass around the f-hole (right) is raising. I have to thank the work

long sound post. Relatively speaking, the penisula is sinking. The sound post is not the only reason.

If I do not do anything the violin would still be playable.

Right now, there is no sound post, no tailpiece, no strings, no pegs, no nut, no end buyyon, no info of the history of this violin.

The label said "Antonius Stradivius Cremonisis" It made me laugh. :)

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Fellow:

After viewing Actonerns excellent clip I think you should contact Rep. Hank Thompson about the problem. He has a deep understanding of this type of thing. He might be able to get you funding to buy the book, bridge, strings, end buyyons etc. and I've got a feeling you two would get along very well. I think you two might be on the same wavelength. He also has access to the Army Corps of Engineers.

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