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It doesn't make sense

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I can't understand the mentality of some people!! Some of my pupils have very good and expensive violins and yet they don't change their strings regluar enough. I keep telling them they are not getting the full benefit of their violin sound. It's like driving a ferrari with 4 flat tyres!! I know they are trying to save on the expenses but IMHO this doesn't make sense at all.

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I can't understand the mentality of some people!! Some of my pupils have very good and expensive violins and yet they don't change their strings regluar enough. I keep telling them they are not getting the full benefit of their violin sound. It's like driving a ferrari with 4 flat tyres!! I know they are trying to save on the expenses but IMHO this doesn't make sense at all.

Maybe they don't notice any degradation of performance. Are they advanced enough to notice? Or are you recommending changing strings according to the calendar rather than according to loss of performance?

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I can't understand the mentality of some people!! Some of my pupils have very good and expensive violins and yet they don't change their strings regluar enough. I keep telling them they are not getting the full benefit of their violin sound. It's like driving a ferrari with 4 flat tyres!! I know they are trying to save on the expenses but IMHO this doesn't make sense at all.

+++++++++++++++

The strings are expensive this day. I just broke one A string.

My lunch money is gone. :)

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Thats really funny. Maybe its because the sound... of the strings slowly diminishes and they dont notice. Ive always hated when rich guitar players like Yngwie Malmsteen put a new set of strings on before every concert. Because that seems wastefull if there isnt an unlimited supply of metal. I played really hard and abused them alot but I made guitar strings last 6 months with alot of rubbing alcohol every sunday. And if you use big strings tuned a little loose they last longer.

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I can't understand the mentality of some people!! Some of my pupils have very good and expensive violins and yet they don't change their strings regluar enough. I keep telling them they are not getting the full benefit of their violin sound. It's like driving a ferrari with 4 flat tyres!! I know they are trying to save on the expenses but IMHO this doesn't make sense at all.

Is there really a benefit from changing the strings? If they are cept clean I thought they would work fine until they break.

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I can't understand the mentality of some people!! Some of my pupils have very good and expensive violins and yet they don't change their strings regluar enough. I keep telling them they are not getting the full benefit of their violin sound. It's like driving a ferrari with 4 flat tyres!! I know they are trying to save on the expenses but IMHO this doesn't make sense at all.

Hi,

Perhaps you should provide a new set of strings and demonstrate the change to your students?

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2 of my cello strings are 100 years old and they give a better sound than any others i have tried..........................i wonder if strings were changed calendar style in the medaeval/renaissance/baroque period...

serious answers upon a postcard please

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This is all very well for moneyed pros, but can noone please explain to an amateur violinist/guitar player why a whole set of the best quality concert guitar strings cost about as much as a single violin D string??

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There is some weird stuff going on in this thread.

1. Billy - 100 year old strings? Really? Baroque strings (all pre-20th century strings) were made from gut. They broke and wore out. If you have 2 100 year old strings I imagine they must just be steel?

2. Anders - there is a huge difference between old strings and new strings. Perhaps steel strings retain their character until they break, but anything gut or trying-to-be-gut will lose quality after a while.

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There is some weird stuff going on in this thread.

Agreed, strings go false after a while as I understand it they become unable to hold consistent pitch. This happens before they break.

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2. Anders - there is a huge difference between old strings and new strings. Perhaps steel strings retain their character until they break, but anything gut or trying-to-be-gut will lose quality after a while.

Can you describe what you hear of changes to the string over time. I am used to Dominants and have aset with DAddarios Zyex (blue) on one fiddle.

Otherwise I am used to overwound gut strings on hardangers. One of these is probaly more than 20 years old and works fine, not much played probaly or been lying a long time before it entered the fiddle. The brand is not possible to get any longer.

I am used to change strings if they are difficult to get to play clean, that is in tune. Washing them in alcohol may help but not for steel strings (e-strings) if there are some corrosion.

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I would describe the change as a dulling of the tone and loss of vibrancy. I'm also an amateur player, putting in about 1-2 hours per day, plus community orchestra, I change strings about every 6 months and use Obligatos (mainly).

I have read that the issue is that the strands that make up the string core breakdown over time in use and that is what puts the string out of true. By extension, for gut strings, I would expect that the thicker natural strands mean they are all or nothing.

On price my understanding is that the precision necessary to make a quality violin string is such that 1. they are more expensive to make and 2. players notice to the extent that they will either play on old strings or pay the premium instead of buying cheap sets from e-bay or the like.

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This is all very well for moneyed pros, but can noone please explain to an amateur violinist/guitar player why a whole set of the best quality concert guitar strings cost about as much as a single violin D string??

I don't know how guitar strings are made but I would guess volume of production has something to do with it.

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This is all very well for moneyed pros, but can noone please explain to an amateur violinist/guitar player why a whole set of the best quality concert guitar strings cost about as much as a single violin D string??

++++++++++++++++

Many brands of violin strings are imported, so they are more expensive due to devaluation of US dollars and imported taxes.

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Can you describe what you hear of changes to the string over time.

sreizes already did a decent job of answering your question, but since it was directed at me I'll chime in too.

When a string is brand new, to me, it sounds particularly bright, and the overtones are especially interactive.

After a day or so, the string settles. It maintains pitch regardless of dynamics and articulation. The sound is easy to control.

After a couple of months, the higher overtones drop out, and the sound becomes duller, less complex. Also, it is more difficult to control color. At this point, many musicians change the strings. I usually leave the strings on unless I have a solo recital.

After a couple more months the string begins to go false. Intonation becomes difficult and the sound of the string can waver between harsh and tinny. Most people change their strings at this point.

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Can anyone comment on whether the new set of strings (after the "break in period" or whatever) sounds any different to the listener or is it just a short range effect perceptible only to the player? I have done recordings and cannot discern any difference. Thank you. Tom

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This is all very well for moneyed pros, but can no one please explain to an amateur violinist/guitar player why a whole set of the best quality concert guitar strings cost about as much as a single violin D string??

As Gowan indicated, Guitar strings are sold in great volume by an couple of orders of magnitude (100s possibly 1000s of times more strings made and sold). Many, many more people play guitar and guitar strings do not last as long. Ecomony of volume and a more competative market.

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