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Sexy Scrolls

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Perhaps not as 'safe' as a Strad or Guarneri, but one which, at least to my relatively untrained eye, I think is very nice.

post-5156-1266890784.jpg

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Lovely photos and scroll Bruce. I imagine you have noticed the small holes of the divider pin on the central spine, it`s interesting that they are equidistants...

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Lovely photos and scroll Bruce. I imagine you have noticed the small holes of the divider pin on the central spine, it`s interesting that they are equidistants...

Yes, they appear to be, and that's interesting, because they also seem to be reliably on the center line. Was the centerline established first with a scribe mark? Don't see anything remaining if it was. Or could the pin holes have been done with a pattern? If done with a pattern, it might have also had holes for width, which would have been cut away when making the chamfers.

Bruce, any thoughts on the process?

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Thanks Bruce!

Do you often see a compass point on the very end (... very end, I mean where spine meets the chin)?

could the holes be leftovers from pinning on a paper template? That would work without a scribe centre line...

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Could the holes be leftovers from pinning on a paper template? That would work without a scribe centre line...

That's what I was wondering about. Evenly spaced on-center holes, without a previously established centerline, might point to use of a pattern.

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Yes, they appear to be, and that's interesting, because they also seem to be reliably on the center line. Was the centerline established first with a scribe mark? Don't see anything remaining if it was. Or could the pin holes have been done with a pattern? If done with a pattern, it might have also had holes for width, which would have been cut away when making the chamfers.

Bruce, any thoughts on the process?

Here is the scribe line, visible on another brothers viola from 1620, you can see it in the reflected light. If there is any trace at all it is usually quite faint.

Bruce

post-29446-1266988960.jpg

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Yes, this faint line can be scraped away... Bruce, do you have an opinion why the holes are equidistant? Sacconi mentions Strad used the dividers to get the outer lines of the scroll, do you believe it's the case with this scroll also? Thanks!

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Here is the scribe line, visible on another brothers viola from 1620, you can see it in the reflected light. If there is any trace at all it is usually quite faint.

Bruce

I guess that was a gentle day for compass jabs. It still shows a scribed arc for the inside of the chamfer, but I don't see the pivot point in that particular photo.

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The central spine is first located with a gauge.

One can use a compass onto the wood directly, but the curve prevents the comass from tuning propely, whereas it's easy enough to make a 'fishtail' templete for the widths, using the compass at the centre line as sugguested. One can prepare a number of templets, in the end saving much time.

So, I use double sided tape to fix the templet to the scroll so I can draw a good line along it's edges.

Cheers.

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HI

I remember a Strad article by Joe Grubaugh writing about how he found a way to recreate Amati fishtails useing the ancient left overs of compass points. Can´t remember the details just yet but in brief, he hopped from one dot to the next and in a very logial sequence the distance between the compass points always gave him the "right" width

don´t know which Strad issue that was... can´t check either

anyone?

Martina

ah Bruce, I just spotted your picture of the Stauffer throat is in the Amati DNA book... should look at my books more closely :)

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I guess that was a gentle day for compass jabs. It still shows a scribed arc for the inside of the chamfer, but I don't see the pivot point in that particular photo.

It's difficult to get an overview from any one instrument. I'm stupid that I don't do these photographs in different lighting angles which will sometimes show something that is not visible with the actual glare in this shot. What you end up with is traces here and there of what is left over after the woodwork is done.

Bruce

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Bruce I may have asked this already and sorry if this is a repeat. Are those macro, ring reversal, extension or bellows shots ? They are wonderful images.

Nikon CoolPix 5700 - I think it's 5 megapixels - macro setting and one tungten light in an otherwise dark room, on a tripod and with white balance preset.

Bruce

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Yes, this faint line can be scraped away... Bruce, do you have an opinion why the holes are equidistant? Sacconi mentions Strad used the dividers to get the outer lines of the scroll, do you believe it's the case with this scroll also? Thanks!

Amongst the Stradivari Museum artifacts there are both types of layouts for the back of the pegbox and volute. Those with a centerline, compass points and different radii and those made up as fishtail templates. The fishtail templates are usually for the pegboxes ending in a shield (madolins, viola da gamba, etc.) whereas those with the individual compass points are for the violas and cellos. No violin patterns for the "scartozzo" are in the collection (except for some scroll decorations of one of the inlaid instruments)although I believe it was the same method as the violas and cellos.

The compass point at the very end of the pegbox heel could be there on the 1615 as an initial point to locate the center point for the radius of the heel. The second point is normally located at a position near the end of the pegbox where the sides change direction and begin to flow into the volute. In the Amati the pegbox gets much smaller at the end where it meets the volute when compared to those later done by Stradivari. In Stradivari, looking at the back of the pegbox you can often see a kink or bump where the pegbox begins to turn into the volute. The rest of the compass points are more or less equidistant from each other, each one obviously with a different corresponding width which Stradivari drew as a radius. If there were any compass points made along the outside edges of the pegbox and volute they were most likely eliminated when the chamfer was made.

The violin heel below is a 1680 N. Amati and here you can see a double scribe line!!

Bruce

post-29446-1267046243.jpg

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Yes, this faint line can be scraped away... Bruce, do you have an opinion why the holes are equidistant? Sacconi mentions Strad used the dividers to get the outer lines of the scroll, do you believe it's the case with this scroll also? Thanks!

The distance between the first radius center at the rounded end of the heel and the second point at the small end of the pegbox are the only two that are not near to equidistant. I honestly think the the series of points were probably perfected over the years, perhaps when a scroll came out particularly well proportioned and they simply set down the measurements in a linear way so the measurements could be reproduced on other scrolls. It is easy enough to see that Stradivari modified these measurements during his long career.

Bruce

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I imagine he traced circles to get the width, the margin on the sides. I do this way, directly in the wood, without a pattern.

Right, but unfortunately all traces of the marks on the outer edges are eliminated when the fluting and the chamfer are made.

On the cello and the viola measurement diagrams Stradivari also undicated the width of the chamfer and the radii for the design of the cello style chin or heel with the offset pegbox walls.

Bruce

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