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PeSt

OPUS-1

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My apology for re-erecting this old thread. But I hear the question a lot how does the first violin sound.

Well, Tomas is playing my first now for nearly three years and earlier this month I heard it for the first time in a concert hall when he was playing Zigeunerweisen by Pablo de Sarasate with the school orchestra.

I was positively surprised how well it sounded, but I would be interested in hearing the opinion of anyone with a bit more experience in judging sound - if this is at all possible.

Wishing you all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year.

Cheers, Peter

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My question is just a couriosity...In your original post (post #1 on page one), you said that you began the violin 10 months before you added that post (the post is dated Feb of 2010, so you began the violin in April of 2009). You also said that your first name was Peter. But...if one takes a close look at the lable showing partly in the second top angle shot, it says that the instrument was made in 2000 (not 2010) and that the makers first name is Steinemann, with a partial last name of Heade...something.

I'm sure that this is all a simple mistake, but can you elaborate??

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Oh dear, the mysterious Label - Well, the saying goes that you shouldn't judge the violin by its label... Or is it the book by its cover?

Cheers, Steinemann Heade...

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Congratulations! I think it is the only word that comes out from me... It will take some time before I recover from the impresssion.

PS: I've decided I'll have my full set of used violin making tools for sale...

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Thanks for reviving this thread, which I had not seen previously. One of the reasons why I embarked on making instruments is that my sons can see and participate in other aspects of making music. The violin sounds and looks great, congratulations.

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Thank you for the kind words on me making this fiddle and on Tomas playing it. Much appreciated.

Considering I used the worst wood I had as I thought the first wont be any good anyway, I am really surprised about the nice sound. So I guess there is more to the equation than the quality of the wood.

Hummm.....

Hummm what?

Well, as this troubles you greatly, I can only say you misread the label - or what you thought you could see through the f-hole.

Here is the real-deal!

Violin67.jpg

You can read more about the making of this violin here.

Cheers, Peter

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Very nice violin. There is some real life to this violin. Some clean looking Strads copies can sometimes be "perfect" and lifeless "stepford wives". That quality of expressiveness tells me you have real talent.

-Peter

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Absolutely Amazing! I have made 4 and I'm not even close to what you have acheived.

Here is a discovery when working on Violin 4. On most old Cremonese instruments f-holes are in a straight line. It's an arching thing:

 

post-37356-0-45530800-1360568897_thumb.png    post-37356-0-95186400-1360568911_thumb.png

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Here is a discovery when working on Violin 4. On most old Cremonese instruments f-holes are in a straight line. It's an arching thing:

don't agree. (depends what you mean by a "straight line" I suppose).

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Absolutely Amazing! I have made 4 and I'm not even close to what you have acheived.

Here is a discovery when working on Violin 4. On most old Cremonese instruments f-holes are in a straight line. It's an arching thing:

 

attachicon.gifStraightF-hole.png    attachicon.gifOPUS-1_F-hole.PNG

It has to do with the amount of recurve in the C-bout, and also at the lower corners. A "loaf" shape as opposed ot a "figure-of-8" will result in f-holes with straightER f-holes when viewed from the side.

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It has to do with the amount of recurve in the C-bout, and also at the lower corners. A "loaf" shape as opposed ot a "figure-of-8" will result in f-holes with straightER f-holes when viewed from the side.

 

Yes, that's what I ment and if you look at pictures on Strads and Del Gesus, many of them have arching that way so that the f-holes looked from the side are "loaf" shaped. As do the Titian Stradivari on the left.

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I don't think the term "loaf-shaped" applies to the f-holes, it applies to the arching itself. In other words, the longitudinal shape of the arch does not conform to the outline, the latter which implies a figure-of-8. A loaf-shaped arching can best be illustrated by contour lines, where these lines don't follow the outline. To me it seems that Cremonese archings on the top mostly show these loaf-shape contour lines, whereas the backs are more like a figure-of-8. A severe rendition of a figure-of-8 outline of the top can be seen on Stainer-type archings, which are both relatively high as well as having pronounced recurves in the c-bout area. This causes a marked upwards flare of the lower f-hole wings. Of the more prominent Cremonse makers some Nicolo Amati instruments approach this, but otherwise it is not common, except in Cremonese makers who migrated, such as Peter of Mantua and Peter of Venice, who apparently were not immune to Stainer influences.

 

However, one should observe both the inner and outer edges of the f-holes in judging the effect of the arching. The eye is easily drawn to the outer edge when viewed from the side. Many Cremonese makers apparently sculpted the lower wings of the f-holes so that their horizontal aspect is discontinuous from the arching as a whole. This is most evident in Stradivari, but to me it seems that at least to some degree it is a general aspect of the Cremonese working method. To attempt a kinda-sorta horizontal aspect of the f-holes simply by means of manipulation of the arching to achieve this effect may well involve some tonal penalties, as this may render the arching too inflexible in a tonally-critical area. It may be structurally strong (less prone to tension distortion), but as ineffective tonally as an exaggerated figure-of-8 shape.

 

Spruce is the material of choice for any instrument with a soundboard supporting strings. The reason would seem to be its longitudinal rigidity and strength combined with its extreme lateral flexibility. Enhancing rather than contradicting these qualities could make sense. Enforcing an arching shape to this end onto a "disconnected" outline seems to me one of the aspects which puts the Cremones method a step ahead of other methods. It renders the top more flexible without sacrificing structural strength.

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However, one should observe both the inner and outer edges of the f-holes in judging the effect of the arching. The eye is easily drawn to the outer edge when viewed from the side. Many Cremonese makers apparently sculpted the lower wings of the f-holes so that their horizontal aspect is discontinuous from the arching as a whole. This is most evident in Stradivari, but to me it seems that at least to some degree it is a general aspect of the Cremonese working method. To attempt a kinda-sorta horizontal aspect of the f-holes simply by means of manipulation of the arching to achieve this effect may well involve some tonal penalties, as this may render the arching too inflexible in a tonally-critical area. It may be structurally strong (less prone to tension distortion), but as ineffective tonally as an exaggerated figure-of-8 shape.

 

I Totally agree, just missunderstood the loaf and figure-of-8 shape as refer to f-holes.

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Yes, live starts with 50! I am originally from Switzerland, but moved to Australia 27 years ago and love it here.

 

Well now I understand why the Basel coat of arms on your avatar, isn't it?

 

What the E and X stand for?

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