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Cracked tip?


kreisler13
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I'm wondering if your vast knowledge of bows can either point me to a good bow or help steer me away from one I shouldn't buy. The two I'm looking at, after playing dozens of bows, are these. A really nice playing bow that sounds great with my instrument by Scott Cao - a James Tubbs copy with silver fittings, silver tip, plain frog, and $1500. It's brand new. The other is a circa 1930 Albert Nurnberger that sounds absolutely amazing. I love it. It also has a plain frog, silver fittings, and an ivory tip. It's $2000, but the ivory tip is cracked at the thin part by the end of the hair on both sides. There appear to be very very slight hairline cracks on either side of the tip. When I say slight, I mean really tiny. The right side's hairline crack is almost a continuation of the split from the ivory. The left side's tiny crack is more of a tiny cleave midway up the tip.

I'd really love to buy the Nurnburger bow, but how much should the condition of the tip factor into my decision? I know that a cracked tip could be a deal killer, but to what degree of seriousness does the crack have to be before it matters? Conversely, does anyone have any experience with Scott Cao Tubbs copies? Thanks for your help.

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I'm wondering if your vast knowledge of bows can either point me to a good bow or help steer me away from one I shouldn't buy. The two I'm looking at, after playing dozens of bows, are these. A really nice playing bow that sounds great with my instrument by Scott Cao - a James Tubbs copy with silver fittings, silver tip, plain frog, and $1500. It's brand new. The other is a circa 1930 Albert Nurnberger that sounds absolutely amazing. I love it. It also has a plain frog, silver fittings, and an ivory tip. It's $2000, but the ivory tip is cracked at the thin part by the end of the hair on both sides. There appear to be very very slight hairline cracks on either side of the tip. When I say slight, I mean really tiny. The right side's hairline crack is almost a continuation of the split from the ivory. The left side's tiny crack is more of a tiny cleave midway up the tip.

I'd really love to buy the Nurnburger bow, but how much should the condition of the tip factor into my decision? I know that a cracked tip could be a deal killer, but to what degree of seriousness does the crack have to be before it matters? Conversely, does anyone have any experience with Scott Cao Tubbs copies? Thanks for your help.

Sounds like the wooden wedge in the head mortice has swollen or was too tight to begin with.

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I'm wondering if your vast knowledge of bows can either point me to a good bow or help steer me away from one I shouldn't buy. The two I'm looking at, after playing dozens of bows, are these. A really nice playing bow that sounds great with my instrument by Scott Cao - a James Tubbs copy with silver fittings, silver tip, plain frog, and $1500. It's brand new. The other is a circa 1930 Albert Nurnberger that sounds absolutely amazing. I love it. It also has a plain frog, silver fittings, and an ivory tip. It's $2000, but the ivory tip is cracked at the thin part by the end of the hair on both sides. There appear to be very very slight hairline cracks on either side of the tip. When I say slight, I mean really tiny. The right side's hairline crack is almost a continuation of the split from the ivory. The left side's tiny crack is more of a tiny cleave midway up the tip.

I'd really love to buy the Nurnburger bow, but how much should the condition of the tip factor into my decision? I know that a cracked tip could be a deal killer, but to what degree of seriousness does the crack have to be before it matters? Conversely, does anyone have any experience with Scott Cao Tubbs copies? Thanks for your help.

+++++++++++++

If the crack is confined only on the ivory tip, it is nothing. You can just simply replace the ivory with bone. (they don't use ivory any more)

If the crack extends beyond white part, to the wooden part, then I would think twice if it is worthwhile to buy it.

The wooden part is a permanant part of the bow. Any repair may change the characteristic of the bow. If you have

wooden part repaired, it is not certain that the bow may be getting better or even getting worst as playing characteristic goes.

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I would agree with Fellow that if it is just the ivory tip which is fractured that is not a problem. Replacement with either bone or mastadon will preserve the value of the bow. If however, the walls of the tip are fractured, that is another matter entirely and could present big problems for subsequent rehairings. Perhaps that is why the Nurnberger is priced at only $2000.

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I would agree with Fellow that if it is just the ivory tip which is fractured that is not a problem. Replacement with either bone or mastadon will preserve the value of the bow. If however, the walls of the tip are fractured, that is another matter entirely and could present big problems for subsequent rehairings. Perhaps that is why the Nurnberger is priced at only $2000.

""The right side's hairline crack is almost a continuation of the split from the ivory. The left side's tiny crack is more of a tiny cleave midway up the tip.""

From the quote above it sounds like the cracks are extended into the wood.This will certainly effect the price and whether or not its serious in a structural way will depend on exactly where they are and what direction the grain in the head is running.

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