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Does this viola repairable?


violins88
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:) $$$$$$ not a quick fix. just went through one of those myself.

cost of repair exceeds value of this instrument many times.

i would do it if i was somewhere a lot less fortunate then where i am currently at.

may not be worth money, but probably worth a few good years of music in a beginner's hands, somewhere...

V_L_R

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This viola, according to the sender, has a crack only on the top. Does it look repairable (I mean relatively easily)? The viola case was run over by a car.

post-326-1265083252.jpg

Thanks,

I could buy one viola about like that one for around $75.00 USD + shipping. ( That is from the factory in China)

If it didn`t have the crack right at sound post I could do a fast fix without taking the top off . it could be done in about an hour. It would play ok but not be perfect.

Only with that crack going right though the sound post spot, I would just buy a new Viola.

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Certainly not a great instrument, but it looks like a clean break if that is the only problem. I think that it could be replaced for less than the cost of the repair and would probably sound better, but at that level of instrument, who knows.

For an instrument that was run over by a car, I am surprised that it didn't sustain greater damage. I once had an instrument brought into my shop which was also run over by a vehichle. The violin and case were an integrated mess and would have required micro surgery.

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This viola, according to the sender, has a crack only on the top. Does it look repairable (I mean relatively easily)? The viola case was run over by a car.

post-326-1265083252.jpg

Thanks,

It's not worth the repair but also there are much more problems than just a crack. Look closely at the lower saddle area... it smells really big trouble there.

It looks like one violin I seen that actually was split in half (the back had exactly the same crack as the top and it was going all the way through the lower block) and it was very weird as both halves were moving freely up and down with only neck holding the whole thing.

May be if it even doesn't have back cracked, the block most likely is...

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If you're looking for a cheap viola, there are many other better cheap beginner ones out there.

I agree that this wasn't run over. If that's the seller's claim, why deal with a storyteller? :)

I'm usually all for repairing things; however, if I walked past this at a flea market it'd leave it where it was. It's a modern half decent import. Making a cast, and fixing the top just isn't worth the time invested. I'd rather work on something worth the time... something with style and history.

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This viola, according to the sender, has a crack only on the top. Does it look repairable (I mean relatively easily)? The viola case was run over by a car.

post-326-1265083252.jpg

Thanks,

+++++++++++++

No one I know that he could make two violi out of one. Was that what you meant?

Of course, it is repairable. :)

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It's passed on! This viola is no more! It has ceased to be! It's expired and gone to meet its maker! This is a late viola! It's a stiff! Bereft of life, it rests in peace! If you hadn't opened the case it would be pushing up the daisies! Its metabolical processes are of interest only to historians! It's shuffled off this mortal coil! It's run down the curtain and joined the choir invisible! This.... is an EX-VIOLA!

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It's passed on! This viola is no more! It has ceased to be! It's expired and gone to meet its maker! This is a late viola! It's a stiff! Bereft of life, it rests in peace! If you hadn't opened the case it would be pushing up the daisies! Its metabolical processes are of interest only to historians! It's shuffled off this mortal coil! It's run down the curtain and joined the choir invisible! This.... is an EX-VIOLA!

It's stunned.

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Immediately let down the string pressure. Mail it to me, I'll pay the shipping and what ever you expect for the trouble of packaging.

Seriously, Scott

Surely you jest. But I cannot tell for sure, since this is the Internet. Are you offering to repair this for free? Or what?

Ok, more detail, the girl who played this viola cried for an hour about it. My niece. I am making a viola for her, but my pace is glacial.

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Surely you jest. But I cannot tell for sure, since this is the Internet. Are you offering to repair this for free? Or what?

Ok, more detail, the girl who played this viola cried for an hour about it. My niece. I am making a viola for her, but my pace is glacial.

Some things can get unnecessarily involved on this forum.

For what that instrument is, it could be repaired quickly, effectively and cheaply. It need not involve high-end repair techiques, and may not be "invisible", but it should render the instrument perfectly functional until your glacial bench-made job becomes available.

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Surely you jest. But I cannot tell for sure, since this is the Internet. Are you offering to repair this for free? Or what?

Ok, more detail, the girl who played this viola cried for an hour about it. My niece. I am making a viola for her, but my pace is glacial.

I don't mean to capitalize on your nieces misfortune, but my offer was to take this instrument off your hands instead of throwing it away. The people on this forum are judging this instruments value on the color of its finish, the type of tailpiece used and the type of case that it is in. If these instruments were produced with different varnish color, french tailpieces and edgier scrolls in hard cases, they wouldn't suffer from this prejudice.

I believe that this viola could be quite playable again by simply gluing and clamping the top back together even if not done to perfection. The bridge and soundpost could be replaced just to the left of center for more stability. Granted, I also suspect there are other damages possibly done to the ribs and blocks.

If this were my instrument I would fix it without incurring much cost. But then, I don't have to make a living on the profits that I make repairing instruments.

My offer of taking it off your hands and paying shipping costs still stands if it is decided to throw it away. As many have stated here, the cost of proper repair does outweigh the cost of exact replacement. If your niece is above the beginners stage then this would be a good time to upgrade to a better instrument.

Scott

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I don't mean to capitalize on your nieces misfortune, but my offer was to take this instrument off your hands instead of throwing it away. The people on this forum are judging this instruments value on the color of its finish, the type of tailpiece used and the type of case that it is in. If these instruments were produced with different varnish color, french tailpieces and edgier scrolls in hard cases, they wouldn't suffer from this prejudice.

I believe that this viola could be quite playable again by simply gluing and clamping the top back together even if not done to perfection. The bridge and soundpost could be replaced just to the left of center for more stability. Granted, I also suspect there are other damages possibly done to the ribs and blocks.

If this were my instrument I would fix it without incurring much cost. But then, I don't have to make a living on the profits that I make repairing instruments.

My offer of taking it off your hands and paying shipping costs still stands if it is decided to throw it away. As many have stated here, the cost of proper repair does outweigh the cost of exact replacement. If your niece is above the beginners stage then this would be a good time to upgrade to a better instrument.

Scott

Scott,

Thanks for taking the time to explain. I will ask that it be shipped to me and I will see what I can do with it.

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well...

if i may offer my cheap fix ideas:

crazy glue.

the hack job top you see below was ill created with a crazy glue joint 3 years ago but never made into a VSO. it stayed on the dash board of my car for 2 months over one summer just for kicks. it never broke or flatten out (it was made from bent sitka). don't know much about glues. but crazy glue works if you want fast and cheap.

if you want to pull the top, then fiberglass a sound post patch. the glue joint on this fiddle is going to put up a good fight. score with razor first. never mind the cleats. i suggest a long strip of "extra strength cross-weaved" paper towel, spent fabric softener or plain cloth. crazy glue and cotton together is exothermic. spray it out with accelerator and you're done in 2 minutes flat.

another alternative is the second picture. glue the fiddle up and drill a hole in the top.

nothing new. sound post connected to the bridge. works very well.

i feel bad for your niece. she knows the value of musical instruments. some students at string classes i've taught smash their instruments around as if they were bats.

unlike Mr. Donnellan here, the kids actually hit things with their fiddle bats.

slideshow_1220135_braves.0818_CC12.JPG

good luck

V_L_R

post-29094-1265258967.jpg

post-29094-1265258976.jpg

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I don't mean to capitalize on your nieces misfortune, but my offer was to take this instrument off your hands instead of throwing it away. The people on this forum are judging this instruments value on the color of its finish, the type of tailpiece used and the type of case that it is in. If these instruments were produced with different varnish color, french tailpieces and edgier scrolls in hard cases, they wouldn't suffer from this prejudice.

I believe that this viola could be quite playable again by simply gluing and clamping the top back together even if not done to perfection. The bridge and soundpost could be replaced just to the left of center for more stability. Granted, I also suspect there are other damages possibly done to the ribs and blocks.

If this were my instrument I would fix it without incurring much cost. But then, I don't have to make a living on the profits that I make repairing instruments.

My offer of taking it off your hands and paying shipping costs still stands if it is decided to throw it away. As many have stated here, the cost of proper repair does outweigh the cost of exact replacement. If your niece is above the beginners stage then this would be a good time to upgrade to a better instrument.

Scott

Yes !! I think that this viola can be repaid by simple means. It would work just as Scott ,and some others have said.

I said what I did, because to me, if I had to work on it for more than 3 hours, I would have surpast the cost of buying a new one.

I say Scott is right in that if it was my`n ,I could take my time and make it better than when it was new!!

But, I would be doing it in my spair time and that is not costing me anything.

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well...

if i may offer my cheap fix ideas:

crazy glue.

the hack job top you see below was ill created with a crazy glue joint 3 years ago but never made into a VSO. it stayed on the dash board of my car for 2 months over one summer just for kicks. it never broke or flatten out (it was made from bent sitka). don't know much about glues. but crazy glue works if you want fast and cheap.

if you want to pull the top, then fiberglass a sound post patch. the glue joint on this fiddle is going to put up a good fight. score with razor first. never mind the cleats. i suggest a long strip of "extra strength cross-weaved" paper towel, spent fabric softener or plain cloth. crazy glue and cotton together is exothermic. spray it out with accelerator and you're done in 2 minutes flat.

another alternative is the second picture. glue the fiddle up and drill a hole in the top.

nothing new. sound post connected to the bridge. works very well.

i feel bad for your niece. she knows the value of musical instruments. some students at string classes i've taught smash their instruments around as if they were bats.

unlike Mr. Donnellan here, the kids actually hit things with their fiddle bats.

slideshow_1220135_braves.0818_CC12.JPG

good luck

V_L_R

That sound post in the picture could not possibly work right!!!

I do like the bat . I should try that for myself.!!

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This viola, according to the sender, has a crack only on the top. Does it look repairable (I mean relatively easily)? The viola case was run over by a car.

post-326-1265083252.jpg

Thanks,

+++++++++++++++++++++

Yes and no. It is all about standard.

Who is going to do the repairing job? Free of charge or have to pay someone who will charge a price for each repaired item.

If this is someone else's viola I would not take it for repair. Either you will not be happy or the owner. Not a good choice.

For example, it is hard to do a sound post patch without frustration or a clean strong center joint. Try them?

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