Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Joshua Bell's Live From Lincoln Center Violin


IBK
 Share

Recommended Posts

Last night PBS presented Joshua Bell and Friends from Lincoln Center in NYC. It looked like he was playing a modern instrument, however the announcer said that he was playing the Hubermann Strad. It looked too new to be a Strad. Any one know what he was playing ????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Last night PBS presented Joshua Bell and Friends from Lincoln Center in NYC. It looked like he was playing a modern instrument, however the announcer said that he was playing the Hubermann Strad. It looked too new to be a Strad. Any one know what he was playing ????

I wondered the same thing when I saw Hilary Hahn on the Conan O'Brien show.

http://www.tonightshowwithconanobrien.com/...es/#vid=1193197

Isn't that a brand new violin she's playing?

Ed

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Years back, Strad Magazine, in two different issues, had articles related to the Gibson Strad.

One was that the owner of the Gibson before Bell got it had a bench copy made by a French maker, down to copying a cigarette burn that the fiddle acquired in its rough life as a stolen violin. So, there is a contemporary look alike to the Gibson out there. But it's hard to believe that that copy would look as un-marked as the one in Oded's picture, if details like cigarette burns were copied.

On the other hand, the second article talked about the restoration of the Gibson by the Beare shop after its recovery as stolen property. The article stressed that many layers of French polish were removed, but not all could be removed without harming original varnish. So some French polish was left on the fiddle. Maybe that kind of clean up of the fiddle gives it a newer look than one might expect it to have. Many of the dings that were in the top most layers of French polish would be gone, while the French polish that remained would really be smoothed out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It sure sounded like a Strad. I have to admit I didn't get a close look at it.

Oded

edit: Here's a picture from the live Lincoln center performance on PBS. The fiddle seems to match his Strad.

~OK

The one in the photograph is the 'Huberman' or, as some call it, the 'Gibson'.

Edit: Or is it the bench copy ????? ....... :)

Bruce

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The one in the photograph is the 'Huberman' or, as some call it, the 'Gibson'.

Edit: Or is it the bench copy ????? ....... :)

Bruce

I suspect that, in general, a violin looks better, less dinged up, in a photo than the actual violin is, if the photo is taken casually, as this one is, or if the photographer is not experienced enough to know how to take the picture.

I took a highly antiqued, contemporary violin (lots of faux soot, darkened scratches, patches of varnish of different shades) to a professional portrait photographer, who had no experience photographing violins. After all, a photographed object is just another object whether people or violin, I though.

The photographer put some strong lighting on the instrument, because I wanted as much identifying details as possible. The resulting photo showed a violin with the same color varnish everywhere. Faux soot and scratches had all disappeared in the strong light. This heavily antiqued violin now looked, in its photo, like a straight varnish job with very little wear. The photo was pretty much useless as identification for the violin in case of theft. The violin's most obvious features, the antiquing, had disappeared.

So, when I see images of fiddles for sale, I try and remember that incident, and try to realize that the real thing probably won't look as good, if looking good means few dings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The one in the photograph is the 'Huberman' or, as some call it, the 'Gibson'.

Edit: Or is it the bench copy ????? ....... :)

Bruce

Here are some details of the pre-Bell owner, Norbert Brainin, and the bench copy maker, Frederic Chaudiere, of the Gibson Strad: (Scroll to bottom of page.)

Gibson Strad bench copy

Here's more on the Gibson Strad from Joshua Bell's web site: (Scroll down about a 1/4th of the page, and be ready for a long story.)

Bell's Gibson Strad

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...