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I think you can learn how to play, but you must know that they will sure be some sacrifices. For example:

Theres no warranty you wont get a bad habit, some problems are dificult to spot without help.

Playing with your teacher usually can helps a lot with intonation.

You will have a harder time progressing and more time-consuming.

Now some advices :) :

Try to follow a method. If you happen to use Suzuki, id suggest you also use a complementary method, one with more excercises and scales.

Since you already play an instrument, you might progress a lot faster than you think, but dont neglect the basic studys or take any leaps or shortcuts.

Watch your bow distribution when playing, this can be easily ignored if you study by yourself.

I studied for sometime without help and, to me, a teacher can really speed up stuff. Now I feel very confident and I like the way I play, and I dont really know if I could have done it without a teacher.

Oh and also, id stay away from Expert Village. The blog seems ok, but why not go straight to professorv's youtube channel? http://www.youtube.com/user/professorV Also check http://violinmasterclass.com/mc_menu.php

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Hello All!

I have recently acquired a family violin that will be up and running in the next few weeks. When I get it back from the shop I'd like to start working on it, playing wise.

And in that quest, I come across a dilemma. I am a poor college student (oh whoa was me for wanting to be an engineer :-p) and would like personal lessons, but if my 6 years of lessons for piano taught me anything (other than piano) it is that good teachers cost money, and the exploration to find the right teacher takes time and money.

So my question is, are there any stellar online violin lessons for super beginners (as in: I know NOTHING of string instruments other than I thudded hammers into one for many years). How to hold the violin, the bow, how to everything. As with any skill, it's easy to develop bad habits, and hard to correct them. So as with piano, I wish to learn from someone who knows what they're talking about. Though as I've found, violin is a lot more about the individual than piano is thus making it a LOT harder to locate sound advice and lessons. Piano you just...read note...locate key...strike...repeat (not to undermine any pianists out there...I've had my time studying at University of Toledo for piano)

Any help would be very much appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Places I have checked out so far:

http://violintutorial.blogspot.com/2008/07...tion-basic.html

&

Expert Village on Youtube

Thanks again,

The Pianist hoping to be violinist soon!

+++++++++++++++

There is no such clear cut " Yes , you can" or "No, you cannot"

It depends on the level of playing that you want to achieve. Good advice is that you should

go over the basic level as soon as possible. That is, to have someone knows how to play to help.

For example, learn first and third positions. Start with a violin method book. Do it carefully.

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There are some very bad teaching websites. I looked at one called ehow; the cello lesson there names the strings incorrectly, and instructs the student to bow below the bridge. Rather than get caught in the folly of self-instruction (there's an oxymoron for you), please find a teacher and if you can't pay, then barter (grass cutting, tutoring, window washing) anything you can. I am sure you have something to offer.

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I am just beginning to learn violin too. I come from a background of being an advanced pianist (classical) and guitarist (mainly electric) and have taught quite a few advanced students guitar. Particularly with guitar I am familiar with physical and on-line teaching methods.

I have looked at all of the readily available on-line violin resources, but I am actually having lessons from a teacher.

In my own experience you can learn to play violin on-line. BUT it will hamper your progress significantly.

I would strongly urge you to get some lessons from a good teacher to begin with. (With the emphasis on good!) The teacher will ensure that you do not start off with faults and habits that you will be unaware of that will later be time consuming and possibly difficult to correct. These range from posture, bow hold, bow balance, bowing techniques, left hand positioning (thumb and finger articulation etc) and so on. Faults with these can easily creep into your playing without you realising. You may even think you are doing it right.

It is also extremely helpful to have a teacher demonstrate passages and techniques to you, as well as accompany you on the violin and / or piano, which is invaluable for both tempo and intonation. There will be many passages, perhaps just a bar or two, where the optimum or correct bowing techniques and strokes will confuse you at first, and a teacher can iron these out in short order.

A further benefit is that a teacher can motivate and "push" you, quite often well beyond what you might imagine you are capable of. Their knowledge of appropriate repertoire helps quite a lot here.

In my own case I am practising two, or perhaps three hours a day (in several short segments - for concentration reasons) and having a one hour lesson weekly. The lesson time goes by in a flash. Progress is rapid because I can read music fluently, but even so there is a LOT of technique to learn. In my view you are at risk of wasting a large amount of your playing time on ineffective and inefficient practice if you do not get some early guidance from a good teacher. It would be no exaggeration for me to say that my teacher has probably advanced my progress threefold compared to what I would have achieved on my own had I chosen the internet route.

Time is one of the most valuable commodities we have. It is a shame to waste many hours of it for the lack of investment in at least some lessons to begin with.

If you really cannot afford a teacher, then at least try to buddy up with another violin student who is more advanced than you.

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Don't even bother if you can't get a good teacher. It's not worth your time and effort. Better to wait, I think.

I suppose with recent improvements in technology, the teacher would not necessarily have to be in the same room, but there is no substitute for instant video and audio communication. Sorry.

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The best path would be to go back in time, to be 4 again. Have good, wealthy parents, living in a city with a major symphony. Make sure these parents know how important learning violin is to you so they can seek out a highly qualified teacher. That would be a good path to it.

So, let me strike a note for the adult amateur. Bowler Hat is an engineering student in college. He wants to learn to play the violin. So do it. Don't wait. There are more resources than ever before. Will you develop bad habits? Probably. Will you be able to play a few tunes? Probably. Will you enjoy it? Probably.

The downside is that you will probably never be a concert violinist. Let me be blunt. Starting now, even with a good teacher, you will probably never be a concert violinist.

Have fun. Enjoy the process. Books, recordings, concerts, jam sessions, workshops, YouTube videos, on-line lessons. Find a violin student at college who wants to trade for math tutoring. It's a worthwhile thing to attempt.

And it's a great diversion, a way to relieve that pre-midterm stress.

Cheers,

Ken

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I've been impressed with Todd Ehle's instructional pieces on YouTube, short segments that take things piece by piece, and worth a try in the case we're talking about. I think that there is no question one can learn alone, though it will help a lot if you are able at least to associate with players in order to see how it's done. Local schools that offer music might be a way to get to some basic instruction, for example. The idea that you must abandon trying to learn unless you can find a teacher is really unkind - if you care about the music then go and play as best you can, regardless. Enjoy it, let it add to your life. If you're doubtful, go to YouTube and look at some fiddlers, who have learned to play respectably in all sorts of ways, and get decades of pleasure out of simple tunes in first position.

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A total beginner would probably be overwhelmed but it might be worth getting a copy of the book Basics by Simon Fischer. This will give extensive written descriptions of proper positions and motions alsong with photographs and lots of practice material.

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Hello All!

I have recently acquired a family violin that will be up and running in the next few weeks. When I get it back from the shop I'd like to start working on it, playing wise.

And in that quest, I come across a dilemma. I am a poor college student (oh whoa was me for wanting to be an engineer :-p) and would like personal lessons, but if my 6 years of lessons for piano taught me anything (other than piano) it is that good teachers cost money, and the exploration to find the right teacher takes time and money.

So my question is, are there any stellar online violin lessons for super beginners (as in: I know NOTHING of string instruments other than I thudded hammers into one for many years). How to hold the violin, the bow, how to everything. As with any skill, it's easy to develop bad habits, and hard to correct them. So as with piano, I wish to learn from someone who knows what they're talking about. Though as I've found, violin is a lot more about the individual than piano is thus making it a LOT harder to locate sound advice and lessons. Piano you just...read note...locate key...strike...repeat (not to undermine any pianists out there...I've had my time studying at University of Toledo for piano)

Any help would be very much appreciated. Thank you for your time.

Places I have checked out so far:

http://violintutorial.blogspot.com/2008/07...tion-basic.html

&

Expert Village on Youtube

Thanks again,

The Pianist hoping to be violinist soon!

+++++++++++++++++

An adult beginner violin learner will give up easily after a few months or a few weeks with teacher or without teacher.

The chance of the event that the student will continue increases if the student is committed to pay a larger sum of tuition.

Many factors are involved. One main factor is the following: Interesting and pleasing violin melodies require higher playing technics when a beginner has not yet

acquired. So, they play boring stuff and constantly being told that this or that way was incorrect. Kids may fair better.

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The idea that you must abandon trying to learn unless you can find a teacher is really unkind - if you care about the music then go and play as best you can, regardless.

Not abandon -- postpone. Look, you have been told the extremes, but we can't predict the future for you. Your chance of success and for sticking to it will be very greatly improved if you periodically get feedback from someone who is very experienced. If you can 't afford weekly lessons, then maybe you can get lessons monthly or on some occasional schedule..

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Not abandon -- postpone. Look, you have been told the extremes, but we can't predict the future for you. Your chance of success and for sticking to it will be very greatly improved if you periodically get feedback from someone who is very experienced. If you can 't afford weekly lessons, then maybe you can get lessons monthly or on some occasional schedule..

++++++++++++++

Exactly, get feed back right way. Even a teacher standing there to watch to make a few corrections

once a while will help. As if you have a violinist consultant.

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I am now wondering if Mark O'Connor's new violin method might help in situations like this. It seems to connect with familiar music and traditional tunes etc., a path forward for learning that may benefit a person working alone (I haven't seen it, so my comments are general). The idea that because one cannot move forward to more complex pieces one is likely to give up is disappointingly negative. If you're wanting to learn to play it's because you find something attractive about the violin and the music, you have listened some, you have an idea of what you would like to do, knowing that you are starting from scratch. It is wrong to discourage such ambitions; they may lead nowhere, but that doesn't mean that the experience is of no value, nor that it should not be tried.

If you want to play, then just do it, however imperfectly. Do it so that you enjoy playing the music, and find music that you enjoy playing. Learn to play by ear if you can; it's the easiest way to assimilate basic tunes. I suspect that all of us have learned a good deal on our own without searching out teachers and doing it "right," and we may not be great at it but we get along and have fun. Take your violin and explore.

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By the way, finding the right teacher should not necessarily cost money, except for transportation. Recitals will instantly show which teachers are good, and many or most teachers will allow observation of lessons by arrangement.

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New thought (for me). Learning violin without a teacher that can actually touch you is like potty training a kid without adult supervision, or depending on self-training to house-break a dog.

Without a person there who knows what you should be doing there is usually no way to get the feedback you need. A teacher can relate the sounds you are making to every part of your body, including the muscle patterns outlined in your skin and adjust you for correction. That is something you cannot do. Doing it yourself, most especially during the first few years is like using hunt-and-pack typing in the dark.

Andy

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I think we're all (or mostly) in agreement that having a teacher is best. Even in the topic header for this thread it's so stated.

Having a good teacher is better than having a bad teacher. Having a good teacher is better than a mediocre teacher, though sometimes that can be a matter of opinion.

But the question is, without a teacher, can one learn to play? People have learned to play on their own, watching, listening since forever. Is it easy? No. But certainly possible. And with all the resources out there, it's easier now than it was a generation ago. Given the interest, why wait? Is life going to get better, less busy, less expensive, in the future? Nice to think so.

Lots of good suggestions here. Better to stick the paddle in the water than to sit there and watch the river go by.

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I thank you all for the support of "Play for the sake of playing" and those whom protest I shant be a member of any 'concert'. In piano, I studied at University of Toledo, and performed not so much on stage, as in the local deli, baker, and wine markets of Erie Street Market for the vendors.

My goals of playing, is be good enough to entertain when asked, and accompany from time to time...much as that which was required of me in my years of piano. And have an instrument to retire with.

I hope you didn't take my comments about not becoming a concert violinist as a deterrent. If playing in a concert or in public is all it takes to be a 'concert' violinist, then I am one, too. But I'm not. By concert violinist, I meant a professional high-level violinist in a major symphony or a soloist. Again, I have fun playing fiddle, make a little pocket-money from time to time, but I'm not a 'concert' violinist.

It sounds like you have a good plan.

In a related vein, I stumbled across this link today, about learning to play after the age of 50.

http://www.musicafter50.com/2009/09/cellis...adult-learning/

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I hope you didn't take my comments about not becoming a concert violinist as a deterrent. If playing in a concert or in public is all it takes to be a 'concert' violinist, then I am one, too. But I'm not. By concert violinist, I meant a professional high-level violinist in a major symphony or a soloist. Again, I have fun playing fiddle, make a little pocket-money from time to time, but I'm not a 'concert' violinist.

It sounds like you have a good plan.

In a related vein, I stumbled across this link today, about learning to play after the age of 50.

http://www.musicafter50.com/2009/09/cellis...adult-learning/

+++++++++++++

I believe after a certain age, the goal is limited only to play for self enjoyment

Violin is a very difficult instrument.

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+++++++++++++

I believe after a certain age, the goal is limited only to play for self enjoyment

Violin is a very difficult instrument.

Yes, though playing music for self-enjoyment is a worthy goal at any age. I think that also includes the satisfaction of actually doing something, rather than many of the passive activities so prevalent now.

One other benefit of trying to play the violin -- indeed a difficult instrument -- is the enhanced amazement one is aware of when hearing someone who is actually good.

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Have the violin put into playing condition and then put it away until you are able to afford lessons.

A competent teacher will make a profound difference in you learning to play the violin. Every lesson, you will find to be priceless, yet you are able to secure the teaching with mere rubles.

Value the teaching and the teaching will value you.

Ken

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Have the violin put into playing condition and then put it away until you are able to afford lessons.

A competent teacher will make a profound difference in you learning to play the violin. Every lesson, you will find to be priceless, yet you are able to secure the teaching with mere rubles.

Value the teaching and the teaching will value you.

Ken

++++++++++++

Yes, the short cut I know for an adult is to do it right at the beginning and put a lot of effort to it.

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++++++++++++

Yes, the short cut I know for an adult is to do it right at the beginning and put a lot of effort to it.

Indeed, there is no shortcut for learning to play well. The same principles apply with an adult as with a child.

The hardest thing I'm running into as a adult returning to violin is un-learning bad habits that I acquired as a child. I was never taught as a youngster the correct anything, with the possible exception of playing (mostly) in tune. So I consider myself more of a beginner, even though I previously "played" for 7 years.

Since I have some background, my current teacher is starting me right off by drilling technique: Shradeick, Kreutzer, etc. One major help has been investing in a better bow, it's amazing how much of a difference a decent bow makes. But there is no substitute IMHO than a good teacher.

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