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Melvin Goldsmith

Recent Fiddle

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I pre cooked the resins to reduce them to their darkest state, then crushed them in a pestle and mortar before combining with linseed oil in the above proportions by weight .

Hi Melvin,

Really nice work! Do you pre-cook the resins together or separately? Cheers,

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I made this violin for a friend who wanted a violin based on the Alard del Gesu of 1742 but styled slightly more more to my friend's taste which would require some tidying of the late DG aproach to symetry and toolwork and a new look finish.

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It is good reference for a new looking varnish. Thanks for sharing.

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I made this violin for a friend who wanted a violin based on the Alard del Gesu of 1742 but styled slightly more more to my friend's taste which would require some tidying of the late DG aproach to symetry and toolwork and a new look finish.

I made a mold from a symetricalised outline of the Alard back and worked freely from that. The F hole from the bass side of the Alard was used and the scroll was based on the Joseph Filus on the Plowden del Gesu.

Most folk will be aware that the majority of my work is antiqued so it was nice to be asked to make a new looking violin for a change. Following the mint condition 'Chardon' pochette I blacked the rib mitres, the button, the scroll chamfer and an internal chamfer on the pegbox.

Melvin,

That's nice! Looks like you really got the dG pochette color....a nod to Bruce for that one.

Joe

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Hi Ken. I was also intrigued by pictures I had of the pochette and inspired and influenced by the amazing pics Bruce Carlson posted for us. My varnish was near as dammit solvent free and actually ended up looking like the varnish orders at the F hole that Bruce showed us. I did consider leaving the peg hole edges and peg box in their natural wood state but in the end darkened them

It's easy enough to show a few pics on the forum but to put it into practice is another story! Well done!!

Bruce

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That´s a really beautiful violin, perfect workmanship!

What is the string brand you are using? (I haven't seen this orange/black winding before)

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Hi Fjodor, Thanks for your kind words. The strings are Pirastro Obligato.

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Striking. Luminous. WOW.

That fiddle must really light up the room.

Some people paint flames on their cars or fighter planes.

Some fiddles got 'em already...

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..............

Hi Fjodor, Thanks for your kind words. The strings are Pirastro Obligato.

Thanks! Are these the strings you usually put on new violins?

(I've read some positive things about them, but never tried them)

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Melvin this is such a lovely fiddle, I have returned again and again to take it all in! Do you find it more challanging to create a fiddle that looks like this one or one that is antiqued? Also thanks for sharing your varnish recipe, do rub out the finish after it has cured or just leave it right off the brush?

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Melvin this is such a lovely fiddle, I have returned again and again to take it all in! Do you find it more challanging to create a fiddle that looks like this one or one that is antiqued? Also thanks for sharing your varnish recipe, do rub out the finish after it has cured or just leave it right off the brush?

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Hi Mike

There are different challenges involved in making new or antiqued loking fiddles but I think my research of antiquing helps with making a new look varnish. One extra precaution with a new looking fiddle is that a maker must be very careful do avoid accidental knocks that might ruin the effect.

My varnish of the brush can lok a bit too shiny. I normally buff it with T shirt material with trace of ethanol and a drop of raw linseed oil to get a warmer surface effect.

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Holy Moses, Melvin! That's enough technique and facility to go around the block a few times! I agree with the others, NOT FAIR! :):)

Your edges remind me of Gaetano Sgarabotto's straight work.

Did you notice any significant difference in terms of sound between this violin and your antiqued versions of the Alard? (Straight vs. gay. There! A bad joke, but it's too late now...)

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Holy Moses, Melvin! That's enough technique and facility to go around the block a few times! I agree with the others, NOT FAIR! :):)

Your edges remind me of Gaetano Sgarabotto's straight work.

Did you notice any significant difference in terms of sound between this violin and your antiqued versions of the Alard? (Straight vs. gay. There! A bad joke, but it's too late now...)

...........

'Bad' jokes are good with me. Fortunately this is my first Alard copy so it will be a while before I am able to answer your question. I do think it is a good model to work on though.

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As a - possible - final note to this thread I would like to add that I am the very lucky owner of this lovely violin.

I wouldn't like to embarrass Melvin by being too fulsome in my praise in public, but I may be in private to anyone who would like to know more.

Andrew

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As a - possible - final note to this thread I would like to add that I am the very lucky owner of this lovely violin.

Awesome - what type of music will you be playing?

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As a - possible - final note to this thread I would like to add that I am the very lucky owner of this lovely violin.

I wouldn't like to embarrass Melvin by being too fulsome in my praise in public, but I may be in private to anyone who would like to know more.

Andrew

Well Andrew, I don't know you but it's obvious you have an excellent eye for quality and I suspect you appreciate owning an instrument made by a good man.

Dean

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