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juzek peg shaver

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8 hours ago, David Burgess said:

In my experience, the Alberti peg shavers have been the best to come down the pike. John Alberti worked with one or more high-level shops to bring them to that level.

One or two of the Oberlin workshops have also purchased them for use by their participants.

Yup.

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I took the blade out to sharpen and felt confident that I could easily reset it  using the lines I had scribed on it and 2 little bolts - wrong! I now believe that it is a dud. Too much slack in it for one to be able to adjust it properly and the time spent messing around is not worth it. I must have fluked it the first time around but now I firmly believe it belongs in the bin.

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First,  know that for pegs scraping works better than a skimming cut, so a tiny bevel on the underside of the blade can make this tool work better. The down of this is that it's slower, especially if you make it too much of a scraper.

Second, to adjust, set the blade as well as you can, then loosen both the taper adjustment and the bolt/s that let the whole adjustment riser float. Put a hard rod (plastic, metal) around 6mm in diameter in the shaper and tighten the adjustment down on it. Let the mechanism float until it self-centers based on  the three points--the blade, the corner opposite, and the bottom of the v in the block. when its certainly centered, tighten the horizontal float adjustment. This sets the V perfect relative to the gap, if you are careful. Then you have to adjust the taper. If you have one of those tapered burnishers for fitting spiral bushings, you can use that to set the whole thing all at once. Probably something  soft, like a peg, won't work as well. Obviousy there's a small amount of skill getting this all right. Overloosening the horizontal adjustment is a bad idea because things can move when you tighten it down. For instance. As always, less-skilled people can find more ways to mess up.

When it's perfectly centered and sharp, it should work pretty well. It will never go well with cheap pegs that have wild grain.

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This is the point at which I wish Nathan would jump in with a photo of his cello endpin shaper, if he still has it. He made it at WH Lee, and it was a wonder to behold how cleanly it worked. Scraping principle, not cutting. If I ever make any shapers I'm going to steal his geometry.

My experience with shapers, from best to worst:
Alberti--beautifully designed, great blades, easy to adjust
TA /Gotz three hole--good design, not as adjustable or well-executed as Alberti
Berberer adjustable--works perfectly when adjusted perfectly; aluminum wears
Herdim four hole--skim cuts too much, would be better with blade lower, more scrapy
File--always works
American adjustable--take all of the worst features of the above, put them in one tool.

Does anyone have experience with the Herdim adjustable shaper?

Larry mentioned pre-cutting under the rings. I have a small hole drilled into the front edge of my bench so I can stick the peg in for holding while I do this.

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1 hour ago, Michael Darnton said:

First,  know that for pegs scraping works better than a skimming cut, so a tiny bevel on the underside of the blade can make this tool work better. The down of this is that it's slower, especially if you make it too much of a scraper.

Are you suggesting a micro bevel on the underside of the blade? I have an Anhelt peg shaver that I've been considering making a new blade for, with the cutting edge at a more obtuse angle to reduce tear-out and make more of a scraping cut.Aehnelt.jpg.452fac4e4f7a6642193b80b078d2b172.jpg

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Michael Darnton's advice for the setup is the one to follow however I have discovered that even well setup, this tool has a fudamental flaw and the way to see it is to do a perfect setup for a standard peg, then wind it up for a large but perfectly cut peg and the setting is all wrong. Then wind it down for a small but perfectly cut peg and it is all wrong the other way. The only way to use it would be to do a setup for the size of peg you are using and stay within a fairly narrow band of adjustment. So if you wanted to reduce a large peg to a much smaller size you would have to reset it 3 times. It is not the precision tool some pretend. I am naive to have believed otherwise but that is the problem of not having a local store to see things in the real and also the value of a forum such as this. Thank you all.

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Following Michael's advice for setting this thing up I slept on the problem and woke up with this idea. The inverted V has a 90 degree angle so I thought a square rod turned on its side would probably give the most accurate calibration. Of course one would have to be gentle so as to not damage the blade. Notice that I am using the conditional tense and am not pretending to know. Why does the manufacturer not include a tool for correct setup?

IMG_0459.JPG

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On 6/11/2020 at 3:56 PM, Randal McKnight said:

Following Michael's advice for setting this thing up I slept on the problem and woke up with this idea. The inverted V has a 90 degree angle so I thought a square rod turned on its side would probably give the most accurate calibration. Of course one would have to be gentle so as to not damage the blade. Notice that I am using the conditional tense and am not pretending to know. Why does the manufacturer not include a tool for correct setup?

IMG_0459.JPG

This is a perfect example of getting what you paid for, or maybe even something less. It's a crappy design; I've had better success resharpening and setting the blades in my old GEWA 3 hole shaver, compared to the Juzek tool.

It seems once any adjustment is disturbed, it never cuts the same again as when new, no matter how carefully one tries to reposition it.

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12 minutes ago, jacobsaunders said:

I don't suppose that the "Juzek peg shaver" is made in a "factory in Prague" is it?

Skoda Octavias aren't made there any more either.

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Michael asked about the Herdim adjustable shaper. I mentioned earlier in this topic that it is what I used for years, but it has the same problems as the other adjustable ones, including wearing of the aluminum. I even made an angled shim for smaller pegs to obviate the need for a wide range of adjustments. That helped a little, but the cure was a set of Albertis. Just no contest.

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2 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I don't suppose that the "Juzek peg shaver" is made in a "factory in Prague" is it?

The Juzek shaver is actually the Condit (Connecticut USA)  shaper , I'm pretty sure. He originally made the modern unusual aluminum tools sold by Juzek US (the forked under-board clamp, etc.)  and also fabricated custom camera parts, most known for an alignment jig for making color dye transfer prints.

With the Juzek shaper, be aware that if you shove the peg in from one end like you do with a regualr shaper, that skews the block and messes up the taper. You really need to use it in the way illustrated in the video earlier--put the peg all the way in, then tighten while turning.

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2 hours ago, Michael Darnton said:

The Juzek shaver is actually the Condit (Connecticut USA)  shaper , I'm pretty sure.

I think you’re wrong about the origin of this. My understanding (actually recollection because I remember when it was first introduced, I’m getting old) is that it was originally designed by Irving Sloane, who was a guitar maker and wrote a pioneering book about guitar making. And the tool was originally marketed under his “IBEX” trademark, which we still know from the bronze finger planes that Sloane also designed. (I’m pretty sure. I won’t take offense if you tell me I’m wrong.) Warren Condit might have been involved in manufacturing them, but that’s just pure speculation on my part, so don’t take it as a truism.

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It's an interesting historical question. When I look through their website, I see the Ibex (Sloan)tools named as Ibex,  and the tools I think of as Condit not named Ibex and being very different style, usually black-anodized aluminum, rectangular sections, no fuss. Not "artistic" like the Ibex. I might suspect, then, that the Juzeks designed them and Condit originally manufactured them. I do remember some of that line at one point referencing Condit somehow or I wouldn't have knonwn his name.

I guess a phone call might solve this quickly!

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7 hours ago, jacobsaunders said:

I don't suppose that the "Juzek peg shaver" is made in a "factory in Prague" is it?

Is there a Master Art peg shaver? How much does it cost? Never mind, cost is no object...

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Well this is just ruining all of the Juzek mystique. I'm still choosing to believe that old man "John Juzek" was gifted esoteric knowledge from the Illuminati who got it from the aliens...and he still completed his most brilliant work in his "senile nudist" period.

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Interesting--I just discovered that the Spring 1976 issue of the VSA Journal has an article "Pegs and Peg Shavers" by Warren Condit.

And check this: 
https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/rutlandherald/obituary.aspx?n=richard-b-ullom&pid=141322771

There must be lots of interesting history out there that we're not aware of!

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On 6/2/2020 at 1:21 PM, Bill Yacey said:

On a larger lathe, a follower taper attachment could be used, and can be reliably reset to the proper angle. The other way I know of, is if the compound rest is indexable, so the cross-feed can be advanced on an angle.

Without either of these two features, I guess one wide blade that cuts the entire shaft length of the peg at once, could be fastened to the cross feed rest at the correct angle and advanced into the rotating peg blank. However, this would take some experimenting to get exactly right again if disturbed or removed.

The only problem I can see using a lathe is if very small cuts are needed to match up the peg diameter to existing holes, is the nuisance of having to remove and chuck it back up repeatedly after checking the fit.

Yes, all of those are possibilities but I'm wondering if @Don Noon has a speedy method for setting the angle of the compound cross slide.  Even with the magnifier on my compound, the angle set by using it isn't accurate enough for shaping a peg.  I have to hold a reamer in the spindle and use an indicator mounted on the compound to get it right, which is a bit tedious.  I've considered adding positive stop index pins for a few of the angles I use regularly, such as 90 degrees and peg/endpin tapers.

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On 7/2/2020 at 5:09 AM, Mark Norfleet said:

Yes, all of those are possibilities but I'm wondering if @Don Noon has a speedy method for setting the angle of the compound cross slide.  Even with the magnifier on my compound, the angle set by using it isn't accurate enough for shaping a peg.  I have to hold a reamer in the spindle and use an indicator mounted on the compound to get it right, which is a bit tedious.  I've considered adding positive stop index pins for a few of the angles I use regularly, such as 90 degrees and peg/endpin tapers.

It would be difficult to set the compound rest repeatedly with any accuracy; I was talking more about this sort of taper attachment:

a.south-bend-lathe-classic-manual-machine 022

An offset tailpiece center would be a set and forget solution:

2MTTAPER.jpg

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On 7/2/2020 at 4:09 AM, Mark Norfleet said:

Yes, all of those are possibilities but I'm wondering if @Don Noon has a speedy method for setting the angle of the compound cross slide.

No, not speedy at all.  It's trial-and-error, turning a peg to see how well it fits the taper-reamed hole.  In order to make very precise adjustments, I have to arrange a dial indicator on my cross slide to see how much I move it.  My peg/endpin lathe is dedicated to only those tasks, so once it is set, I won't change anything unless I get a new taper reamer that might be slightly different.  Also, my jeweler's lathe doesn't have a compound slide, but the whole cross-slide assembly has to be angled.  Fortunately, I have another lathe to use for other things that aren't tapered.  And another jeweler's lathe in a drawer that I haven't set up for anything.  How many tools are enough?  (never enough)

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2 hours ago, Don Noon said:

No, not speedy at all.  It's trial-and-error, turning a peg to see how well it fits the taper-reamed hole.  In order to make very precise adjustments, I have to arrange a dial indicator on my cross slide to see how much I move it.  My peg/endpin lathe is dedicated to only those tasks, so once it is set, I won't change anything unless I get a new taper reamer that might be slightly different.  Also, my jeweler's lathe doesn't have a compound slide, but the whole cross-slide assembly has to be angled.  Fortunately, I have another lathe to use for other things that aren't tapered.  And another jeweler's lathe in a drawer that I haven't set up for anything.  How many tools are enough?  (never enough)

Thanks Don.  I was hoping to learn a new trick...   When I get a second lathe running in a few weeks I -might- dedicate the one I'm using now to peg stuff, but probably not as it's too useful for other things.  I'm not sure how many tools are enough.  I have 4 lathes.  Fortunately one of them fits in a drawer like yours.

 

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6 hours ago, Bill Yacey said:

It would be difficult to set the compound rest repeatedly with any accuracy; I was talking more about this sort of taper attachment:

a.south-bend-lathe-classic-manual-machine 022

An offset tailpiece center would be a set and forget solution:

2MTTAPER.jpg

Yes, I'm familiar with taper attachments for toolroom lathes, but don't happen to have one at this point.  The tracer attachment I have can likely be adapted pretty easily though.  An offset center in the tailstock (or a tailstock that can be offset) is a good idea, but it is dependent on a consistent peg (or bushing) length for accuracy.

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