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juzek peg shaver

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Hello all,

I've been (like a lot of you) having a bear of a time shaving pegs with the Juzek, but have some helpful tips on how to get around the miserable operation. A guitar string winder gives you a lot more leverage on the peg, and pushing down towards the blade while turning helps to eliminate some of the cam lobe results. Guess I have the bottom end quality shaver, but the Wirbelschneider is presently beyond my means.

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You're talking about the black aluminum one? Another tip is to spin the peg very quickly, but without a lot of pushing in (for this, the blade has to be sharp). Also, if you put a TINY bevel on the bottom of the blade it works better, but don't do that until you resharpen: getting the blade back in perfectly is essential, and difficult. Another thing is that the V on the top block has to be centered over the opening below. A round rod , with the taper set parallel, is useful for getting that exactly right.

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You're talking about the black aluminum one? Another tip is to spin the peg very quickly, but without a lot of pushing in (for this, the blade has to be sharp). Also, if you put a TINY bevel on the bottom of the blade it works better, but don't do that until you resharpen: getting the blade back in perfectly is essential, and difficult. Another thing is that the V on the top block has to be centered over the opening below. A round rod , with the taper set parallel, is useful for getting that exactly right.

All excellent points. Also make sure that the blade is not extended too far into the cavity. I have had one for about 40 years and when properly adjusted works "ok"

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All excellent points. Also make sure that the blade is not extended too far into the cavity. I have had one for about 40 years and when properly adjusted works "ok"

I've had my body for more than 50 years and when properly adjusted works "ok"

:)

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I've had my body for more than 50 years and when properly adjusted works "ok"

:)

Yeah, me too. But it doesn't seem to work as good as it did when it was newer. My Juzek shaver too worked better when it was new, but takes too much messing around to get it to work just "OK", so now I use a jeweler's lathe to turn pegs. Much easier, more precise, and better finish.

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Good wood makes peg shaving much easier. I've had some squirrely grain before... don't even know how they made such bad wood into pegs.

This first time that I shaved pegs, I's try to start turning with the entire peg shaft inserted into the shaver. You don't have to get the entire length, until your final turns.

Who had the peg demo showing to score around the collar before shaving? If you follow those directions, you'll be fine.

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How do you hold pegs in the lathe?

Like this:

post-25192-1259108164.jpg

There is a wooden cone which locates the peg knob, and 4 screws to adjust and center it. The anti-knob side is just held by a dead center. The dead center is pushed so that the other end of the peg is held in the cone by friction.

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I have been using a Juzek cello and violin peg shaver for a little over a year and have found a few things to help.....

  1.  I took a piece of pine (one for a cello peg and another for a violin peg) , 3"X 2"X 4" and cut a slot in one end of it that the peg head will fit into snuggly. I then rounded the edges of the block of wood to allow you to get a comfortable grip on the block. Inserting the peg head into the slot you can now easily turn the peg in the shaver with much less effort.

 

  2.  I insert the peg about 3/4 of the way into the shaver to begin the process. Back it out the adjusting knob and then readjust so about 3/4 is in the shaver and repeat until you have the size you need.

 

  3.  DO NOT reverse the direction of the peg (counter clock wise) while it is seated into the blade. The edge of the blade is so thin that the reverse pressure will roll the edge of the blade and then it will have to be resharpened. Always release the adjusting knob to remove the peg. 

 

  4.  I also seem to get a build up of material after every pass thru the shaver. For some reason it does not want to drop out, so cleaning it out after each adjustment is helpful.  I have even on occasion had to remove the blade because material will build up under the blade edge causing it to not properly cut. Yes, you MUST tighten the hex head bolts very securely!

 

  5.  I also clamp the shaver in a vice to give it stability rather than holding it in one of my hands while turning the peg with the other. 

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3 steps to make it work.

  • File a wedge of hard plastic to fit into the groove and push the blade up against it so that it is easy to always set the blade in the same place.
  • Scribe lines above the inverted V and on the edge of the groove.
  • Glue a piece of angle with 2 screws on the side to help with micro adjustment.

Trying to understand it took a lot of time and too many ruined pegs - now that I understand it the process is easy and it works very well. I hope this can help some people avoid a lot of frustration.

IMG_0456.JPG

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I have an older version of this shaver I bought years ago. I just recently purchased a new blade for it. Is the blade adjusted at an angle or is it parallel to the opening. I haven't looked at it for years so I'm not sure how to adjust it.

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Hello Rob, Parallel to the edge and max 0.5mm overhang, then just make sure the middle of the inverted V is even with the middle of the distance between the edge of the blade and the other wall of the slot on both ends.

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On 11/24/2009 at 7:17 PM, Don Noon said:

Like this:

post-25192-1259108164.jpg

There is a wooden cone which locates the peg knob, and 4 screws to adjust and center it. The anti-knob side is just held by a dead center. The dead center is pushed so that the other end of the peg is held in the cone by friction.

Is this lathe dedicated to peg cutting?  If not, do you have an easy method of replicating the angle?  I always do bushings on a lathe, but getting the angle right isn't so critical for something that's 5-8mm long.
(I've been tempted to put an index pin or two in my compound to quickly return to frequently used angles, such as 90 degrees...)

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On a larger lathe, a follower taper attachment could be used, and can be reliably reset to the proper angle. The other way I know of, is if the compound rest is indexable, so the cross-feed can be advanced on an angle.

Without either of these two features, I guess one wide blade that cuts the entire shaft length of the peg at once, could be fastened to the cross feed rest at the correct angle and advanced into the rotating peg blank. However, this would take some experimenting to get exactly right again if disturbed or removed.

The only problem I can see using a lathe is if very small cuts are needed to match up the peg diameter to existing holes, is the nuisance of having to remove and chuck it back up repeatedly after checking the fit.

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I have one of those somewhere, but I gave up using it years ago. For a long time I used a Herdim adjustable shaper, which is a heavier duty version of the same thing. With enough fussing it would work, but not always that well. Then I sprang for Alberti shapers and it was a revelation. Worth every penny. There was a discussion of these on this forum not too long ago. Also, Iburkard mentioned the quality of the wood. Yes, makes a big difference, but again, the Alberti shapers will turn pegs that my old shaper would make into scrap. Sorry if this is a little off the intent of the discussion, but there's just no comparison.

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46 minutes ago, stringcheese said:

I have one of those somewhere, but I gave up using it years ago. For a long time I used a Herdim adjustable shaper, which is a heavier duty version of the same thing. With enough fussing it would work, but not always that well. Then I sprang for Alberti shapers and it was a revelation. Worth every penny. There was a discussion of these on this forum not too long ago. Also, Iburkard mentioned the quality of the wood. Yes, makes a big difference, but again, the Alberti shapers will turn pegs that my old shaper would make into scrap. Sorry if this is a little off the intent of the discussion, but there's just no comparison.

In my experience, the Alberti peg shavers have been the best to come down the pike. John Alberti worked with one or more high-level shops to bring them to that level.

One or two of the Oberlin workshops have also purchased them for use by their participants.

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43 minutes ago, stringcheese said:

I have one of those somewhere, but I gave up using it years ago. For a long time I used a Herdim adjustable shaper, which is a heavier duty version of the same thing. With enough fussing it would work, but not always that well. Then I sprang for Alberti shapers and it was a revelation. Worth every penny. There was a discussion of these on this forum not too long ago. Also, Iburkard mentioned the quality of the wood. Yes, makes a big difference, but again, the Alberti shapers will turn pegs that my old shaper would make into scrap. Sorry if this is a little off the intent of the discussion, but there's just no comparison.

I think there are a lot of old peg shaper models, that just aren’t very good. I tried that Juzek model, and found it to be deeply unimpressive.

There is huge gulf in price between the old models, and newer designs which work so much better. I guess that is why they still sell.

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3 minutes ago, David Burgess said:

In my experience, the Alberti peg shavers have been the best to come down the pike. John Alberti worked with one or more high-level shops to bring them to that level.

David, is his own mover and seconder, but in case he gave me his proxy and I didn't get the message...I second his emotion.

Sorry, Smoker fans, but...

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aO5YmKrxnSY

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55 minutes ago, Wood Butcher said:

There is huge gulf in price between the old models, and newer designs which work so much better. I guess that is why they still sell.

Hope springs eternal. That’s why they still sell. But didn’t Michael Darnton say the secret was to spin the peg fast, and then they can be made to be functional and useful for non-standard tapers?

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This is true, but it's definitely not my first choice of peg shavers, when I have a choice. The secret for keeping them working is to keep all the parts perfectly centered--the point of the V block directly centered over the gap below. But over time the side of the gap opposite the blade begins to wear, the corner softens, but mostly near the entrance, and it's harder to keep it working well because there's no longer a definite center spot.

Now if only John Alberti made one! . . .

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