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Best music schools


MingLoo
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In the US, my list would be something like:

Curtis

Juilliard

USC

Indiana

Rice

Oberlin

Manhattan School of Music

Berklee

New England Conservatory

Boston U

Yale

UC Berkeley

San Francisco Conservatory

Northwestern

University of Miami

University of North Texas

I'm not sure how accurate my list is. Curtis is definitely the top, however; this is where all the young prodigies go, who play like adults when they're children. Curtis only accepts a small number of students, and of those it accepts, all go for free.

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Interesting.

I wouldn't include Boston, Yale, Berkeley, Berklee, Northwestern, Miami, or North Texas. But to compile a list you need to say what you mean by best. For example, if composition and musicology are really important to you, Berkeley would make the list. If you care about rock & jazz, Berklee would make the list. Yale doesn't have an undergraduate program and Oberlin doesn't have a graduate program. If you're talking about top orchestra programs Rice would top Curtis. SFCM has what might be the strongest chamber music program in the country.

You also forgot Eastman, Peabody, Michigan, Mannes, and Colburn. If you're making a list of places with strong graduate programs I'd include Stony Brook too.

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Interesting.

I wouldn't include Boston, Yale, Berkeley, Berklee, Northwestern, Miami, or North Texas. But to compile a list you need to say what you mean by best. For example, if composition and musicology are really important to you, Berkeley would make the list. If you care about rock & jazz, Berklee would make the list. Yale doesn't have an undergraduate program and Oberlin doesn't have a graduate program. If you're talking about top orchestra programs Rice would top Curtis. SFCM has what might be the strongest chamber music program in the country.

You also forgot Eastman, Peabody, Michigan, Mannes, and Colburn. If you're making a list of places with strong graduate programs I'd include Stony Brook too.

You're so right (about everything). And how could I forget Eastman and Peabody. I thought of Rochester but couldn't think of the name of the school..

Yale doesn't have an undergraduate? Are you sure? Not much more than a year ago (or 2??) Yale came into quite a lot of money and it became known that anyone accepted into their music program would go, gratis. But I thought you had to have a _Yale_ UG to get the free ride in grad. NO?

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In the US, my list would be something like:

Curtis

Juilliard

USC

Indiana

Rice

Oberlin

Manhattan School of Music

Berklee

New England Conservatory

Boston U

Yale

UC Berkeley

San Francisco Conservatory

Northwestern

University of Miami

University of North Texas

I'm not sure how accurate my list is. Curtis is definitely the top, however; this is where all the young prodigies go, who play like adults when they're children. Curtis only accepts a small number of students, and of those it accepts, all go for free.

You left out the Mannes College of Music in NYC.

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Updated list (I'm sure this is online somewhere; I did look but didn't spend too much time with it):

Curtis

Juilliard

USC

Indiana

Rice

Eastman

Cleveland Institute of Music

Peabody

Oberlin (undergrad only)

Manhattan School of Music

Mannes College of Music

Berklee

New England Conservatory

Boston U

Yale

UC Berkeley (musicology)

San Francisco Conservatory (chamber music)

Michigan

Northwestern

University of Miami

University of North Texas

And of course there are tons and tons of good local schools which turn out good musicians, composers, conductors, or students who go on to top schools for graduate school. The main thing, however, is to find the teacher you want to work with. And try to find what the teacher does in the summer, and do that if you can.

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Hah. Just like a Juilliard kid.

Juilliard might be the best school in New York, but it isn't necessarily the best "big picture" school. Once you get to those few top schools (Juilliard, Curtis, Colburn, NEC, Eastman, Rice, Peabody, CIM, Indiana, and Oberlin) it becomes a matter of the teacher you want to study with.

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++++++++

The list of best schools? Everyone has a list (opinion about things).

I do not know who are better teachers among my 5 violin teachers. Some are good soloists but

bad instructors. Some are just the opposite. They all are capable in serving students. It is hard to rank person to person.

How can you rank a school against another?

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Hah. Just like a Juilliard kid.

Juilliard might be the best school in New York, but it isn't necessarily the best "big picture" school. Once you get to those few top schools (Juilliard, Curtis, Colburn, NEC, Eastman, Rice, Peabody, CIM, Indiana, and Oberlin) it becomes a matter of the teacher you want to study with.

But to make a list like this you must look at the whole package. Of course, for the individual instrumentalist, who is still working on technique, then it is the best teacher, but that is a limited view of the school, not a big picture. What school on your resume' opens the most doors, which offers the widest assortment of experiences, who has the most impressive faculty overall, facilities, quality of student body, environment, what does the community offer? You look at all these things and in my mind it's not close in the US.

Yes I went to Juilliard (a long time ago, so my experience my not be relevant today), but I had a choice. The only school I applied to that I did not get into was Curtis, but I was already 20 years old, I wasn't what they were looking for, but some of the teachers there I auditioned for offered me entrance to other schools they taught at. I was accepted at Eastman, Rice, Boston University, New England Conservatory, and others that I can't remember. Being in New York was the primary consideration, having the Yard on my resume' was another. I was accepted to every audition and competition I applied for after my second year, with the major orchestras around the world. I didn't take any as I switced my major, but the point is I know people from other 'major' schools who have never been accepted for a major orchestra audition, even after years of experience in addition to their degree. And it WAS an incredible experience with incredible teachers and amazing students. I did not get stabbed in the back one time

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  • 2 weeks later...
In the US, my list would be something like:

Curtis

Juilliard

USC

Indiana

Rice

Oberlin

Manhattan School of Music

Berklee

New England Conservatory

Boston U

Yale

UC Berkeley

San Francisco Conservatory

Northwestern

University of Miami

University of North Texas

I'm not sure how accurate my list is. Curtis is definitely the top, however; this is where all the young prodigies go, who play like adults when they're children. Curtis only accepts a small number of students, and of those it accepts, all go for free.

I wonder how

Menuhin School

Purcell School

would place, if they were in the above list. These two are in England UK(London or close by)

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