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dfowler1685

Tone tops out around $12K

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It's clear that beauty of violin tone correlates with price, at least up to about $12K. For example, a six thousand dollar violin sounds better than a three thousand dollar violin. However, once you get to about 10 or 12 thousand, a different factor kicks in, namely, prestige of maker or previous owner. In other words, a 20 thousand dollar violin doesn't sound twice as good as a 10 thousand dollar violin. But depending upon who owned the violin, or who owns violins by the maker, the higher value will persist at auctions. At least for awhile. Of course, the most expensive violins are owned by the best musicians, and naturally they sound better when they're played than cheaper violins owned by amateurs.

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It's clear that beauty of violin tone correlates with price, at least up to about $12K. For example, a six thousand dollar violin sounds better than a three thousand dollar violin. However, once you get to about 10 or 12 thousand, a different factor kicks in, namely, prestige of maker or previous owner. In other words, a 20 thousand dollar violin doesn't sound twice as good as a 10 thousand dollar violin. But depending upon who owned the violin, or who owns violins by the maker, the higher value will persist at auctions. At least for awhile. Of course, the most expensive violins are owned by the best musicians, and naturally they sound better when they're played than cheaper violins owned by amateurs.

The value of a violin is a complex matter and not limited to its tone. Age, provenence, reputation of maker, condition, market forces, etc have a great deal to do with what one pays for a string instrument.

It is certainly true that a concert violinist , violist, cellist or bassist needs the tools of the trade so to speak, however there are many avocational players who own very valuable instruments and are not always able to play them to their fullest potential..

A few stories. Many years ago(1970) I was invited to play chamber music at the home of a person who became a well known violin collector. He was quite wealthy and had just acquired his first Strad and was at the age of about 50 just starting to learn the violin. When I was introduced to him he asked if I would like to see his newly acquired Strad. My first reaction was , "yeah, right." I politely said I would love to see it. He brought out a violin, certified by a big violin house in Philadelphia and it was indeed a Stradivarius. I asked him to play it for me. What came out of the violin was not what one would like to hear from a Strad. A fifty dollar fiddle would have suited this player just fine. My feeling was that that fine violin would probably never reach it full potential in the hands of that particular player.

Story 2. Once after a Heifetz concert, a woman approached Jascha Heifetz and said to him: "Mr. Heifetz your violin sounded so beautiful this evening. Upon hearing that compliment, Heifetz picked up his "David" Guarnerius and held it up to his ear and said to the woman, "Funny, I don't hear anything. "

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Tone is a subjective thing and highly dependent on the player. But even assuming that it could be evaluated objectively it doesn't "top out" relative to price. A law of diminishing returns applies to violin quality in general. For the sake of discussion, say that for $20,000 you can get 90% of possible quality. Then for $40,000 you might only get to 93% and for $80,000 to 95%, for $160,000 to 96%, etc. In any situation like this you have to decide whether paying twice the price for a small increment in quality is worth it to you. For top concert artists it might be worth it while for us run-of-the-mill amateurs we might not be able to make use of that small increment in performance.

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Beauty of violin tone does not correlate with price. To repeat what the expert violin dealers keep telling us, tone is subjective and has no bearing on the price of violins. I believe the experts. I also believe a comment made by Andrew Victor referring primarily to factory violins that as the price goes up the number of violins you have to try to find an acceptable one goes down.

No matter how nice a violin with no collector value may sound, it will remain inexpensive. Dud violins with collector value may very well increase in value, no matter how poor they may sound. Most violin buyers do not buy purely on the basis of utility as a musical instrument but rather on appearance and any perceived collector value with acceptable tone and playability.

Click on the Library tab above and then on Maestronet Magazine for the informative articles " Inexpensive Doesn't Mean Cheap"

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It's clear that beauty of violin tone correlates with price, at least up to about $12K. For example, a six thousand dollar violin sounds better than a three thousand dollar violin. However, once you get to about 10 or 12 thousand, a different factor kicks in, namely, prestige of maker or previous owner. In other words, a 20 thousand dollar violin doesn't sound twice as good as a 10 thousand dollar violin. But depending upon who owned the violin, or who owns violins by the maker, the higher value will persist at auctions. At least for awhile. Of course, the most expensive violins are owned by the best musicians, and naturally they sound better when they're played than cheaper violins owned by amateurs.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

A professional violinist paid such huge amount of money

to buy a violin with reason. I believe they know what they are looking for.

Tone quality is a part of they consideration and/or appreciation in value as time goes by..

For most of us, not of that level, your observation is about what I feel.

My violin teacher plays a $60K violin. When I tried his violin , the tone I drew it was not

thing special. In this case, the players make the difference. He can draw better tone.

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