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fidleir

sound post cracks

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I've recently bought this from ebay http://cgi.ebay.fr/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewIt...E:X:AAQ:FR:1123 an old french factory fiddle for repair, it is, I believe, a Laberté Humbert Freres violin.When the fiddle arrived I noticed that it had 2 soundpostcracks both front and rear.I thought it would give good practice at doing a sound post patch .However on removing the top I found that both cracks were in fact quite stable and only fractionally into the wood just below the varnish what would the more experienced of you do in this situation?

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The cracks may appear stable, but when you actually have post, string and playing pressure going, forget about it. The cracks will V open from the inside and get worse. I agree that since you have the top of already, it's well worth your while to do a top and back post patch... it simply needs to be done (based on what little info you’ve provided).

It looks like your violin was cooking in an attic or garage for a long time... fingerboard glue beading up on the bare neck.

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I've recently bought this from ebay http://cgi.ebay.fr/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewIt...E:X:AAQ:FR:1123 an old french factory fiddle for repair, it is, I believe, a Laberté Humbert Freres violin.When the fiddle arrived I noticed that it had 2 soundpostcracks both front and rear.I thought it would give good practice at doing a sound post patch .However on removing the top I found that both cracks were in fact quite stable and only fractionally into the wood just below the varnish what would the more experienced of you do in this situation?

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You mean one on the top and other on the back sound post patches?

Could it be the plates that have problems? (too thin comes to mind)

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Perhaps the plates were too thin, but perhaps someone sat on the violin, or slammed the case shut… lots of possible causes.

I worked a tatty handy violin with a crack in the back. The crack only revealed itself after clear coating and setting the instrument up (original finish was almost gone… matte wood), which was a real bummer. If I had flexed the plates, or set up before clear coating, I would have seen the post push well in advance.

Be glad that you noticed the cracks first. Now you are in a position to fix a major problem before setup.

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I think he wants to know what you would do if it needs to be redone, i.e. after the inspection.

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What you would do depends on what you have found out in the inspection.

For example, remove the patch if necessary, reglue it if all it takes. How one can say in advance?

Gee.

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+++++++++++++++

What you would do depends on what you have found out in the inspection.

For example, remove the patch if necessary, reglue it if all it takes. How one can say in advance?

Gee.

There are two cracks both on the outside of the violin but penetrating through to the inside.

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Sorry that should read NOT penetrating through to the inside

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It is a good thing (not penetrating inside).

I don't know how other people would do in this situation.

I did patch one like this on my inexpensive violin from out side.

So, it is a lot more stable. That is, I no longer have to worry the crack

to extend further but the look is less than desired. I guess one has to settle with

some loss.

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I did patch one like this on my inexpensive violin from out side.

So, it is a lot more stable. That is, I no longer have to worry the crack

to extend further but the look is less than desired. I guess one has to settle with

some loss.

I am trying to imagine such a patch from the outside - I would love to see pictures of an outside post patch - front or back.

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I am trying to imagine such a patch from the outside - I would love to see pictures of an outside post patch - front or back.

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It does not look good. I knew it before I did but for stopping the crack

extend. Every repair situation is different. I would not recommend you to try or

I should be so proud, like the professionals to shown pictures for other to see.

PS. A little history of my violin. The saddle crack started about 5 mm then turned into 10 mm

and un-broken (no crack) for 5 mm then another 5 mm (crack) all along one grain of wood.

It does not affect the sound before and after repair. Only worry was thirt getting to the crack

or further extending.

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+++++++++++++++++++++

It does not look good. I knew it before I did but for stopping the crack

extend. Every repair situation is different. I would not recommend you to try or

I should be so proud, like the professionals to shown pictures for other to see.

PS. A little history of my violin. The saddle crack started about 5 mm then turned into 10 mm

and un-broken (no crack) for 5 mm then another 5 mm (crack) all along one grain of wood.

It does not affect the sound before and after repair. Only worry was thirt getting to the crack

or further extending.

I patched inside the top no problem and did an outside patch to the back you are so right I stabilized the crack but it's not pretty something had to give

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I patched inside the top no problem and did an outside patch to the back you are so right I stabilized the crack but it's not pretty something had to give

The violin was open, why didn't you patch it already from the inside? That would be the logical way to do it...

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Some butter knives have teeth... so... I think you meant a dull silver spoon.

Can we see photos of your repair? I hear that plastic wood is lovely this time of year.

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Some butter knives have teeth... so... I think you meant a dull silver spoon.

Can we see photos of your repair? I hear that plastic wood is lovely this time of year.

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Sorry no photo.

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Some butter knives have teeth... so... I think you meant a dull silver spoon.

Can we see photos of your repair? I hear that plastic wood is lovely this time of year.

I don't seem to see the need for for patching an area that is not open, the crack was on the outside the inside sound so smart asses what would you have done. If the crack did not effect the sound post area I assume that it would simply have been glued.As the crack was over the sound post it had to be stabilised.I gouuged out a elongated area the length of the crack and and patched it with maple, perfectly sound and stable; sanded ,stained and blended in a matching touch up varnish a good job but unfortunately bloody obvious.I don't have a digital camera.

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I don't seem to see the need for for patching an area that is not open, the crack was on the outside the inside sound so smart asses what would you have done.

Obviously, you have no slightest idea of how violin should be repaired, you follow the ideas of worst adviser on the maestronet and you also call experienced people that try to help you "smart asses"? What can I say... congratulations

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