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A Small Problem Becomes Big


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C'mon guys, that's not nice.

There are many people, especially nerds, who have a deep-seated need --it goes well beyond desire-- to feel self-sufficient and to go their own way. Often it comes from a childhood spent as an involuntary outsider. For someone whose early social experience consists largely of rejection, learning how to "go it alone" is the key to psychological survival. And the reason for the rejection doesn't matter: the late psychologist Abe Maslow --of Hierarchy of Needs fame-- once remarked that it was a constant source of amazement to him that he hadn't grown up psychotic, having been the only Jewish boy in the neighborhood and relentlessly rejected by his non-Jewish peer group.

Yuen might not have experienced that kind of alienating childhood, but it wouldn't surprise me to learn that he did.

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C'mon guys, that's not nice.

There are many people, especially nerds, who have a deep-seated need --it goes well beyond desire-- to feel self-sufficient and to go their own way. Often it comes from a childhood spent as an involuntary outsider. For someone whose early social experience consists largely of rejection, learning how to "go it alone" is the key to psychological survival. And the reason for the rejection doesn't matter: the late psychologist Abe Maslow --of Hierarchy of Needs fame-- once remarked that it was a constant source of amazement to him that he hadn't grown up psychotic, having been the only Jewish boy in the neighborhood and relentlessly rejected by his non-Jewish peer group.

Yuen might not have experienced that kind of alienating childhood, but it wouldn't surprise me to learn that he did.

Naw, I'm not buying that in this case.

I'm all for going it alone, but in this field, any offer of help/instruction ought to be taken if at all possible.

There is just so much to learn.

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As a bit of an autodidact myself, I can understand Yuen's wish to go it alone. The joy of personal accomplishment and of solving a tough problem is real; the downside is the time lost in ree-inventing the wheel, along with re-inventing a myriad of dead ends.

But the ideal of apprenticeship to someone who has mastered the necessary skills necessarily closes some creative doors. Not that we are likely to see a quantum jump beyond Stradivari here . . . but how many makers here did not run terminal experiments on cheap fiddles?

The man has major stones. I enjoy his complications.

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. . . but how many makers here did not run terminal experiments on cheap fiddles?

Just the opposite here: I didn't run the really edgy experiments until I had enough experience under my belt to be able to reasonably predict the results. One reason I suggested that Yuen come and visit me is because I have helped others in similar situations do The Quick Thing That Works rather than the quick thing that falls apart later.

Horses for courses, as they say. Sometimes a couple of slices of business card and some Gorilla glue do a fine job.

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The difference between those who have gone their own way and the party in question is that there is not a hint of his ability to be able to do this. You have to have a certain minimum of natural inclinations or talents, but when they are completely absent, one has to face reality.

I have read Yuen's posts for years now. At one time, I found them charming in a way. The novelty of watching incompetence has worn off. There is no real attempt on his part to improve skills or progress, but at times there is capricious disregard for others who bother to volunteer opinion, like saying he will use his eyes to check the angle instead of taking the advice to measure. This is a community, and if one asks for advice and then repeatedly does things completely opposite in spite of it, that is going to annoy many casual readers.

As far as cultural differences go, there is something called common courtesy, and this extends to all people of all nationalities. Stradofear's generous offer was made in public, and thus people are free to interpret it any way they want. I think it was very discourteous for Yuen to not at least send a public or private note (and quickly) thanking him while offering some kind of explanation as to why he would be declining. As it was, he eventually offered curt thanks, but only after the prodding of many others.

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Enough armchair psychology.

Though I think that I can envision it, still, I'd like to see a quick photograph of the key elements involved in the "hammer method" of plate removal.

I have only ever used a hammer and a block of wood to remove a stubborn saddle or nut.

A quick, sharp blow works well on hide glue in those instances.

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Just the opposite here: I didn't run the really edgy experiments until I had enough experience under my belt to be able to reasonably predict the results. One reason I suggested that Yuen come and visit me is because I have helped others in similar situations do The Quick Thing That Works rather than the quick thing that falls apart later.

Horses for courses, as they say. Sometimes a couple of slices of business card and some Gorilla glue do a fine job.

++++++++++++

Hi Stradofear and all,

Officially I would like to say " Thank You" (It has been said in somewhere else too, nothing new here from my part

It is good to know you have such good luthier friends coming from all directions)

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An important aspect of participation in discussion groups is to learn to disagree without being disagreeable. Ad hominem attacks should always be avoided. No, we don't have license to degrade, insult or hurt anyone's feelings.

Admittedly I find it very puzzling that someone would reject an offer of help.

I wish Yuen the best of luck in his future adventures into violin repair.

Oded

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The difference between those who have gone their own way and the party in question is that there is not a hint of his ability to be able to do this. You have to have a certain minimum of natural inclinations or talents, but when they are completely absent, one has to face reality.

I have read Yuen's posts for years now. At one time, I found them charming in a way. The novelty of watching incompetence has worn off. There is no real attempt on his part to improve skills or progress, but at times there is capricious disregard for others who bother to volunteer opinion, like saying he will use his eyes to check the angle instead of taking the advice to measure. This is a community, and if one asks for advice and then repeatedly does things completely opposite in spite of it, that is going to annoy many casual readers.

As far as cultural differences go, there is something called common courtesy, and this extends to all people of all nationalities. Stradofear's generous offer was made in public, and thus people are free to interpret it any way they want. I think it was very discourteous for Yuen to not at least send a public or private note (and quickly) thanking him while offering some kind of explanation as to why he would be declining. As it was, he eventually offered curt thanks, but only after the prodding of many others.

++++++++++++

Hi GMM22,

Well said.

I do it one more time. (two posts above)

Thank you, Oded Kishony, You are a kind man . (It is my hobby to fix my own violins, "fix" may not be the right word )

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I am sure I will regret expanding in response to your comments O.K., nonetheless, an ad hominem attack is defined as attacking a persons character instead of the argument. There can be no ad hominem when the character is the argument. Could elements of my remarks be considered harsh? Sure, but not overly.

Further, there is no shame in being informed of our limitations. When someone says "gmm, you cannot sing, and when you do, I have the urge to jump off a tall building," I say thank you for being candid, and I will sing no more, or at least not before seeking professional voice coaching.

And seeing that Yuen feels the post was well said, I trust some frank elements were helpful to him. Perhaps it will give him the motivation to take the craft and any advice offered a bit more seriously, and this could only be to his benefit. I would certainly be glad to learn of any good progress of his.

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