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Hi all


HongDa
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Hi all,

Been a while since I've had time to get on here. 2nd child keeping me away from the computer.

I thought these pictures would be interesting for some here as I found some posts mentioning these various traits. I won't give the maker's name in case some of you want to guess. I'm sure the experts will know right away.

So presuming it is authentic.....

One thing that I'm curious about is the screw. The instrument is dated 1895. Wouldn't some corrosion be expected? It almost appears to be made of aluminum also. Possibly a newer screw from a neck resetting?

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Never seen a slab cut bass bar before - always a first time for everything.

ps - I would have preferred a Phillips screw and a washer.

I vaguely remember an article (perhaps Strad mag) which mentioned an original Amati slab-but bass bar.

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That was my inital thought... until I measured the stiffness of one slab cut and one quartered... they're the same.

Just to be sure, are you saying that the a piece of wood of square cross-section has the same stiffness when measured with the grain 'vertical' or 'horizontal'?

And the number of times this has been done with difference pieces of wood is?

------------

Later...

The tone of the questions is meant to be 'inquisitive', not 'inquisitional'.

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Just to be sure, are you saying that the a piece of wood of square cross-section has the same stiffness when measured with the grain 'vertical' or 'horizontal'?

And the number of times this has been done with difference pieces of wood is?

------------

Later...

The tone of the questions is meant to be 'inquisitive', not 'inquisitional'.

Yes, and I only tried it once.* I measured the stiffness on my one test as being identical slab and quarter. Actually, since the tangential grain direction (vertical direction on a quartered bassbar) is the softest, a slab cut bar would be slightly more resistant to compressive distortion (bass foot vertical force compressing the grain)... although at first glance this doesn't seem to be a real concern. Cutting a slabbed bassbar would be more of a pain, crossing the rings at shallow angles.

You'd think the dense rings would act as beams, making the quartered direction stiffer vertically, but that is not so. I think it gets down to the geometry of the cell walls, which tend to line up better crossgrain than along the rings.

*this is a super-easy test that anyone can do. Just set up the fence on the bandsaw and cut twice, then see which way rings at a higher tone.

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Is that steel wool residue in the f... and clear coated?

Looks like steel wool in the picture but it's maybe just the contrast setting.

It looks to have had some French polishing done on it but not really as shiny as it looks in the picture.

Apparently the instrument has a certficate of authenticity. The customer brought it in for a tone adjustment and new fittings.

He was also asking my opinion about a new bassbar. I told him that he'd better take it to a reputable restorer for advice as I'm not sure how it's value would be effected.

Out of curiosity; what is the standard practice of changing a bassbar if an instrument is authentic and it's bassbar is original?

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