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Violin ID - just finished repairs


iburkard
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If you need images of extreme wear, here you go. I left most of the old crack repairs alone, but did re-cleat in areas. What is this thing?

This was the violin with the warped back that I slowly pulled together over the last month. Sorry, no photos of the final back yet, still need to make the varnish imperfect to match the rest.

diamondScroll.jpg

diamondViolinA.jpg

diamondViolinB.jpg

diamondViolinC.jpg

diamondViolinE.jpg

diamondViolinH.jpg

diamondViolinI.jpg

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Thanks Manfio.

The blocks and bar are fitted oddly as well. The corner blocks follow the ribs for quite some distance, tapering quite thin. The bar is “soft” looking, and flows into the top. It is not part of the top, but a lot of time was taken to make sure that the transition was smooth. Perhaps there was some notion that hard angles inside of the body would interrupt the flow of sound? The centerline studs on the top were also rounded.

The feathered corner blocks might have been done to give the whole thing more strength, but ironically they made the ribs crack (uneven strength) where there was no block reinforcing the rib material.

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Yes, this new information reinforces the idea of an untrained maker as the author of the instrument. Imagine a good, clever woodworker in a remote village 100 or 200 years ago. Violins (even factory made violins) were expensive so they tried to make their own. Imagine how much pleasure these instruments brought to their comunities!

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I didn't say that it was pretty, just wondering if the odd scroll rang any bells. I've seen a few like these hanging in diners. :)

I have never commented on threads such as this. In this case, edges and arching and a few other things suggest to me that this maker made quite a few violins. That is, if it is not a joint effort. Sure, it is idiosyncratic, but good work to my eye.

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The neck is dovetailed into the top block, so I can't imagine that it was replaced due to the attachment type. The varnish also appears to match. It's just a quirky style of making I suppose. All of the small finished details are done oddly, but well. Even the nut is odd. Granted I replaced it with horn, but the space for the nut is notched into the neck... nonstandard. There were some repairs to the top, but nothing extensive, just paper thin cleats tearing down both ffs, and at the neck root.

The tailpiece isn't original... old though. It was missing the inlay and lift for the strings... I used pearl for the shield, and horn for the lift.

lovydovy.gif

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The neck is dovetailed into the top block, so I can't imagine that it was replaced due to the attachment type. The varnish also appears to match. It's just a quirky style of making I suppose. All of the small finished details are done oddly, but well. Even the nut is odd. Granted I replaced it with horn, but the space for the nut is notched into the neck... nonstandard. There were some repairs to the top, but nothing extensive, just paper thin cleats tearing down both ffs, and at the neck root.

The tailpiece isn't original... old though. It was missing the inlay and lift for the strings... I used pearl for the shield, and horn for the lift.

lovydovy.gif

++++++++++++++

Your violin has character. I hope it has a good vioce. Does it have a good voice ?

Being old and healthy of a violin is un-characteristic. Many of this kind in existence that they take

up a lot of space.

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I haven't measure it... will do that when I get home.

There are so many interesting nonstandard violins out there.

This violin didn't come with pegs, so I fitted new square head pegs. I like the fact that they are boxy.

So you have a 20C tailpiece like this with gold inlay? I've seen others with pearl, and assumed that mine was pearl originally, but perhaps not. Maybe someone needed quick cash or a filling redone? :)

As to the sound, I need to fit a new bridge tonight. The feet on the original are paper thin (due to the high arching), and needs to be replaced. The sound is clear, but not as round as I would like... don't know if I'm willing to spoil it with better strings.

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So you have a 20C tailpiece like this with gold inlay? I've seen others with pearl, and assumed that mine was pearl originally, but perhaps not. Maybe someone needed quick cash or a filling redone?

Here a photo of the tail piece in question. (assuming I have done the attachment correctly, or if you look very very closely at my avatar... )

post-5291-1244760139_thumb.jpg

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Yeah, that looks like the right tailpiece for sure. I beleive that there might be three pins soldered to the back of the shield (had three small holes in the ebony tailpiece of mine) to hold it in place... or perhaps those were pilot holes for the carving of the shield negative?

The widest point of the lower half of the body is 8.25"... the widest part of the upper half is 6.5"

The body is 14" long, sans the button.

Total length is around 23.5"

Slimmest portion at the Cs is 4.25" shy.

I cut a new bridge last night, but haven't had a chance to tune or play (finished late at night 1 - not a good time to tune when you live in an apartment). I'll tune it up after dinner.

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The shape looks like Czech violins that you see with that narrow and rounded upper bout. If you look at the inset nut and dovetail it's something that a guitar or mandolin maker would do so maybe they made other instruments and decided to have a go at a violin or maybe they already made a range of instruments and decided to mix it up a bit. I agree with Johnmasters though that it looks like a bit more than an amateur effort.

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not amatuer, just never got known

this person strikes me as one who had "good ideas"....that would make it "extra strong"

as in extended blocks and dovetailed necks, which while the peice is fresh may give it some added strenght

but it sounds like such renforcement worked against itself over time

i'd guess eastern europe

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It's funny, all of these "stronger" violins seem to be the ones that are broken, and generally fail around the stronger areas. It's not that the structural design changes don't hold, but that the rest of the instrument is still traditional work that doesn't play well with too much strength.

After settling for a while the violin has become a bit brighter. I'm interested in what you had to say John. :)

I've moved on to another really weird fiddle, which I might post within the month... laminated back... through neck... baroque.

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