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edge thicknessing


actonern
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I've never seen a post on this site describe this method of roughing out plate edges, so I'm tossing it out as an alternative method.

Lots of folks use an "over head" type cutter on a drill press.

I'm using a slot cutter bit on a router table (like this) http://www.bladesnbits.com/merchant.ihtml?...p;lastcatid=129

I use a bit that cuts a 1/8 inch slot, and the wheel limits the travel into the plate to about 10 mm.

I adjust the router table to the thicknes I want and run the plates around... It's very fast.

Once the slot is cut it's very quick to gouge the wood down to the established edge.

If you want more of a button/corner thickness increase you can adjust the router table as required.

One more idea...

E

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One of the things I gifted myself with at Christmast was a Wagner Safe-T-Planer (see StewMac), basically an overhead rotary planer as you described. I plan on using it to speed things along with waste-wood removal, at least on #2 - it will be used to set the arch height and the edge thickness, on both the back and the top. Why? Well, for this specific instrument, I'm making it as a graduation gift for my daughter, so I don't want her to have to wait longer than necessary. I just this evening showed the kids (daughter and son) the projects-in-process and told them it was their grad gift - basically I showed them a pile of wood, although her rib garland is done, and the plates for his guitar are joined and rough-cut (nice bear-claw sitka top, East-Indian rosewood back and sides), and the neck is roughed-out.

Anyway, I see nothing wrong with using such tools to remove waste wood, but I plan to use them carefully, and the final cuts will of course be done by hand. And the carving of the arches...

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Anytime a piece of wood is moved into a rotating router bit free hand there is the possibility of the bit grabbing.

To help with this a 'post' is used to support, until the bearing is activated by contact with the wooden object.

The wooden object is pivoted off this 'post' until the bearing is reached.

To think otherwise would be putting oneself at risk, so until the router bit cuts the 10 mm into the wood for the bearing to make contact,

you are flying by the seat of your pants if you do not have a post to act as a fence.

Yes the 'post' is a very short fence, and then the bearing which is essentially a rolling fence, ensure that the piece is always supported.

Router Table 'Post'

If the bit does grab, it is so fast that the human operator cannot react fast enough, and so prevention has to be a fore-thought, not an after-thought.

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Anytime a piece of wood is moved into a rotating router bit free hand there is the possibility of the bit grabbing.

If the bit does grab, it is so fast that the human operator cannot react fast enough, and so prevention has to be a fore-thought, not an after-thought.

I have had plenty of power tool injuries, but not this one, thank god.

I abandoned the idea, after seeing how powerful the reaction is when the router bit does grab the wood.There is no reaction time. You could easily loose a finger or worse...

Abandon all hope ye who enter here. (ok, so that is a bit dramatic)

I also use a dremel tool, but with the Stew-Mac routing attachment - as long as the plate is roughed out, it provides an excellent, flat, even edge, and excellent control.

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Hi guys,

If used carefuly and with a guard, then the slotting saw in the drill press method does work.

Just to mention that of course you shoud remember which way the tool is cutting and always feed the wood in at an even controlled rate so it won't grab, otherwise it hurts.

Another safer route is to buy the plates with an edge thickess already done, which saves time and works out very well.

Doing it by hand with a scribe around the edge and gouging down to the line is more fun.

Raining here in Ireland. :)

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I hope to one day get good enough to be fast with hand tools.

I have a long way to go.

Til then...I will be slow...and enjoy it. (no offense to those who want to explore power tools...just be careful...things happen quickly...might could have finished the plate by the time you get out of the ER :) )

Edit...been too busy lately...just noticed after the post my avatar (or whatever you call it) shows another way of edge thicknessing.

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I use something like this in a drill press, which i think is quite safe.

Oded

Doing it by hand with a scribe around the edge and gouging down to the line is more fun.

My first one was done with the scribe and gouge method; enjoyable, and didn't seem painfully slow. However, I do have some slitting saws, and thought I might try that next time. My concern is that the saw only turns one way, and at times will be cutting in an undesirable direction relative to the grain... tear-out and chipping problem?

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Hi Jezz, I always fancied setting up in Amsterdam :) , or maybe Berlin :) .

Good luck with your move anyway.

Don, you're correct about the action of the saw especially at the corners you have to be very careful. As long as you feed the wood in against the direction of the cut, you and the wood will be safe and the cut will be clean.

Using the scribe around the edge makes it easier to do a smoothe variable edge thickness, since you don't have to keep on resetting the depth stop on the drill press.

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