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Medullary Rays


PASEWICZ
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I've done some samples (on red maple and European maple) with lime casein, ammonia casein and potassium dichromate that darkened the rays alot on the red maple and less so on the European maple. It did not look good on the red maple. I didn't think the dichromate looked good on anything and not worth the health risks.

Can't say I've done very extensive experimenting with these though.

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I have fumed maple bridge wood with ammonia in a glass jar, it turned the maple a very nice color brown but didn't seem to change the rays much, it seemed to bring the two closer in color with less contrast, the same with spruce.

Reese

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I have done experiments on samples to change colors for some corner repairs I was working on about 6 months ago. I wanted the repair wood that had similar medulary rays to look as close as possible.

These were experiments and i'm far from an expert but they did change various colors.

1. Dilute iron acetate and vinegar - dark brown fleck but also greys out the regular grain and darkens annual grain

2. Potassium Hydroxide 10% solution in water - followed with black tea with a few drops of balsamic vinegar (I used this to get what I needed in the fleck to a more brown red - threw it in the uv box and it was the closest I could match)

3. Balsamic Vinegar & Ammonia/Water solution

4. One test i did which got close but not quite the right hue I was looking for was potassium hydroxide casein/water solution with dye - letting it dry then horsetailing once more till the regular grain did not hold as much dye but left color in the fleck.

Hope this helps - I only used this for small repairs on a brothers amati copy I was working on awhile back... i'm sure there are some other folks who have some better information that can help.

Tell matt hi.

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Does anyone have experience in changing the color of medullary rays?

................................................................

Why might you be asking?????? :)

Not sure if what follows is relevent to yr question ........but I guess topical applications or fuming or cooking etc might have some effect, localised or general but finding a piece of wood to match must be a better way to go.

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Ive been puzzled by the question, do you mean darken the rays or actually colouring them ?? :)

Specifically I am asking about coloring the medullary rays in ebony. I find that sometimes I get a good wood match for a cheval with the exception of medullary rays being a little "Whiter" than I would like.

Jerry

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Specifically I am asking about coloring the medullary rays in ebony. I find that sometimes I get a good wood match for a cheval with the exception of medullary rays being a little "Whiter" than I would like.

Jerry

Hi Jerry Pasewitz,

You could try a solution of sulfate of iron. It is sold by Kremer.

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I have not personal experience, but Hammerl mentions boiling campeachy wood shavings or logwood extract with iron vitriol (ferrous sulphate) or potassium dischromate in water to dye the ebony black.

Apparently the black colour is more intense if the ebony is placed in the boiling solution or in the hot solution after it has boiled.

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I have not personal experience, but Hammerl mentions boiling campeachy wood shavings or logwood extract with iron vitriol (ferrous sulphate) or potassium dischromate in water to dye the ebony black.

Apparently the black colour is more intense if the ebony is placed in the boiling solution or in the hot solution after it has boiled.

To be more specific, I am not looking to dye the ebony as a whole, just slightly color the rays.

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To be more specific, I am not looking to dye the ebony as a whole, just slightly color the rays.

Hi Jerry Pasewitz,

Sulfate of iron comes in green salt like cristals. You disolve it in water and rub the solution on the ebony. It makes the ebony a darker, uniform colour.

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Hi Jerry Pasewitz,

Sulfate of iron comes in green salt like cristals. You disolve it in water and rub the solution on the ebony. It makes the ebony a darker, uniform colour.

I second iron sulphate if your wanting the rays a darker colour.I,ve used iron sulphate to vacuum impregnate streaky ebony ,it comes out jet black all the way through, with the rays more a bronze colour than silvery white .Its not too easy to get decent quality ebony in the UK,thats why i resorted to it.There seems to be quite alot of tannin type chemicals in ebony. If you put a piece in iron sulphate solution the iron solution will turn black pretty quickly.

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[ One concern is that iron is pretty corrosive, don't know if that would be pertinent in this project

Andrew,iron tannate or Gallate(which is what produces the black coloration like in ink) is pretty stable and will in fact protect steel from further corrosion.Much like red oxide used to prime steel before painting.Its slightly corrosive to iron and steel when wet but even then it will cause a blackish coating on the metal and then produce a passifying effect to prevent further coating.

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