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Wood Music stand


Eiji Fuller

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Hi guys,

I am a woodworker in San Diego and was recently commissioned to design and build a fully adjustable music stand. I also built one for my brother, Joel, who is a violinist for the National Symphony. I am extremely pleased with how they came out and have talked Joel into letting me hold on to his for a while so I could enter it in the Design in Wood International Woodworking Contest.

I am very excited about this design and am hoping to be able to make many more and market them. They are obviously not professional photos and they do not do the piece and the finish justice. The woods are South American Leopardwood and Wenge.

I would love to get some feedback from you guys about the stand. This is the Gasparo Stand. The desk has a 14"h x 22"w surface. It has a double shelf with notches in the supports for bow placement. The desk angle is fully adjustable and the height adjusts from 32" to 56". It is made entirely of wood with the exception of the brass adjustment screws.

Thank you for you time,

Eiji Fuller

619-750-3663

www.fullerbuilt.com

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Very nice looking stand. A couple of observations, if I may:

It's not clear from the pics if the stand goes low enough for seated position playing, but that might be just the angles of the camera.

While it looks nice, I don't think I'd like it as a practice room stand. It's very formal and austere, perfect for a teacher's studio or concert hall setting. As a practice room stand, maybe a little bit of rounded corners, something to not make one feel boxed in as one looks at the music. The Manhasset even has slightly rounded corners. Maybe you could market two models?

I really like that unlike some wooden stands, you made the back of the stand (where you put the music) of solid wood, not slats, making marking the music much easier.

Thank you for showing us your work!

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A few observations from who drools over beautiful music stands:

- beautiful wood

- top looks disproportionately large relative to the base, so some subtle expansion of the latter may help the visual proportion.

- the plain face of the top makes it look heavy, so some subtle fretwork or inlay may lighten the 'feel'

Maybe this is another place where the Golden Ratio should be applied.

----------------

A little later...

I should clarify my comments. These were based on an assumption that the stand would be in my music room and not in a huge auditorium.

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To my eye you've created a handsome music stand worthy of any practice room. I can see how one might get the impression that it is "heavy", but I personally interpret the generous propotions to suggest "substance". Detailwork on the desk would detract from the natural beauty of the figure of the wood, methinks.

One semiconstant concern for many musicians is the ability of the desk to accept clothespins to help secure the music down in even the most domestic of breezes. The desk appears to be quite thick and getting the average clothespin around the edges looks like it could be quite a challenge. I don't know how you could solve the problem. Perhaps one could attach some clips/wire prongs which come over the upper edge to hold down music. The key for any solution is simplicity, ease of use, and quick operation.

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To my eye you've created a handsome music stand worthy of any practice room. I can see how one might get the impression that it is "heavy", but I personally interpret the generous propotions to suggest "substance". Detailwork on the desk would detract from the natural beauty of the figure of the wood, methinks.

One semiconstant concern for many musicians is the ability of the desk to accept clothespins to help secure the music down in even the most domestic of breezes. The desk appears to be quite thick and getting the average clothespin around the edges looks like it could be quite a challenge. I don't know how you could solve the problem. Perhaps one could attach some clips/wire prongs which come over the upper edge to hold down music. The key for any solution is simplicity, ease of use, and quick operation.

The desk is actually 10mm thick or about 3/8". That was about the minimum thickness I could achieve with this design. It had to be thick enough to accept the sliding dovetail joinery of the shelves and back brace. At 10mm thick clips should easily be used for the task you describe.

Thank you for the comments. this design was all about simplicity. The desk is one piece to make it comfortable to make notations to the music. My brother requested the double shelf so he could put his stereo remote, pencil, eraser, and rosin on the lower shelf for easy access without the items in the way of turning pages.

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For simplicity, I can think of Bauhaus.

ps - I hope it doesn't crash over with a slight knock. I imagine your large wood top wood perched on a narrow base would exacerbate the problem.

Janito,

The base is actually quite substantial. It is 12.5" x 12.5" and 1 3/4" thick at its peak. The size and weight of the base lend alot of stability to the stand. I can push on the top pretty forcefully and the stand barely moves. It is very stable.

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Of course this is one of those either you like it or you don't deals.

I think, The non pierced top is too heavy and the lacewood pattern is too much of a distraction at this size. The base is questionable in appearance (weight) and undoubtedly has a questionable joinery. Temper some of this comment with the fact that this is just not my style of woodworking.

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Of course this is one of those either you like it or you don't deals.

I think, The non pierced top is too heavy and the lacewood pattern is too much of a distraction at this size. The base is questionable in appearance (weight) and undoubtedly has a questionable joinery. Temper some of this comment with the fact that this is just not my style of woodworking.

Sorry for the thin skin but this is a bit much.

questionable joinery? The post attaches to the base with a mortise and tenon for alignment and a thru bolt for strength and the ability to remove the base for shipping (it is the same fastening system used to attach stair newel posts to the floor and can withstand a large amount or torque). The inlay of wenge around the base is set in a 1/2" x 3/8" dadoe around the base and is not affected by the bases inherent need to expand and contract. I guess I could temper your comments if they were not so outlandish. I am certainly not going to tell you that the violin you have is made questionably because that is not my expertise. Woodworking is my expertise and I build my pieces to last lifetimes!

Eiji Fuller

www.fullerbuilt.com

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Sorry for the thin skin but this is a bit much.

questionable joinery? The post attaches to the base with a mortise and tenon for alignment and a thru bolt for strength and the ability to remove the base for shipping (it is the same fastening system used to attach stair newel posts to the floor and can withstand a large amount or torque). The inlay of wenge around the base is set in a 1/2" x 3/8" dadoe around the base and is not affected by the bases inherent need to expand and contract. I guess I could temper your comments if they were not so outlandish. I am certainly not going to tell you that the violin you have is made questionably because that is not my expertise. Woodworking is my expertise and I build my pieces to last lifetimes!

Eiji Fuller

www.fullerbuilt.com

Easy Cowboy...

If I had known you were that this skinned I wouldn't have mentioned anything but fine woodworking is also my area of expertise and that joint is not one I would consider using. Traditionally one has a set of sliding dovetailed legs but I have seen many variations. I actually collect images of well done antique and modern music stands for future ideas.

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Dean,

I guess woodworking is your expertise. I took a look at you website. What a beautiful tall chest of drawers you built!

I still do not uderstand your statement of questionable joinery. Could you explain?

I have shown this piece to a few of the most talented woodworkers in the country including Brett Hesser, www.hesserhandcrafted.com, and have recieved nothing but positive feedback on the construction of the piece.

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Dean,

I guess we were typing at the same time.

I purposefully did not use traditional legs. They would not fit this design. But I still stand on the strength of the post to base attachment being as strong as any other base design.

The problem with the bolt through design is that it is usually not a "stand alone" form of joinery. While it might withstand some torque the lever action in thios small area has a tremendous force that can damage the wood if someone did mistreat the stand. In stairways the post is supported by the rest of the railing. Ever try leaning on a freestanding newel post?

No offense intended just straight shooting thoughts that I admitted already are subjective to a large degree.

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From a functional point of view: can the stand be lowered enough for a string quartet player to use?

As a violinist I really dread playing chamber music with a stand in front of me that is too tall. I do like the looks of your stand, though.

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Personally I like this stand a lot; it would be ideal in my practice room. I currently use a Manhasset at standing height, with a shelf and a stand light. I tend to let music accumulate to the point that the Manhasset sinks, and I think a sturdy stand like this one would be a perfect replacement. If it had a built-in light it would be perfect! Nice work!

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The problem with the bolt through design is that it is usually not a "stand alone" form of joinery. While it might withstand some torque the lever action in thios small area has a tremendous force that can damage the wood if someone did mistreat the stand. In stairways the post is supported by the rest of the railing. Ever try leaning on a freestanding newel post?

No offense intended just straight shooting thoughts that I admitted already are subjective to a large degree.

What would ever possess you to lean on a music stand? Obviously the stand was made to support itself and any amount of music you could possibly fit onto the desk.

This stand weighs a little less than 18 lbs. The woods are very dense so a less dense wood like Mahogany or Sapele would weigh in at about 15 -16 pounds. A standard size desk would also lessen the weight. Keep in mind that this would not be a stand you would want to carry around to your gigs. It would be a music room stand.

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I can push on the top pretty forcefully and the stand barely moves. It is very stable.

Thanks for the update.

I come back to the Golden ratio.

Perhaps: (i) length to width of top, (ii) top area (?) to base (area?), (iii) top height to total height.

Engineering aside, humans are so innately tuned to this proportion, that this may be what is eliciting some of the Nay comments.

See here for example:

http://www.world-mysteries.com/sci_17.htm

and here:

http://jwilson.coe.uga.edu/EMT668/EMAT6680...tio/golden.html

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The proportions of the desk may not be perfect in aesthetic guide lines like the golden rule, but I was asked to build it to that size (14"T x 22"W) to accomodate oversized music like opera music.

I did build another with a 12.5" x 20" desk with a single shelf and that looked a little light IMO. To each his own I guess.

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All the professional wood worker professional discussion aside, I still think this is a stand that is too severe for the practice room for regular musicians. We practice and a stand such as this one reminds me too much of a lectern that implied authority without any room for independent thought. You are a young maker and your very talented siblings are undoubtedly a source of inspiration. Step outside the box without insulting the more experienced makers and wood working artists that frequent this site. They all mean well and don't suffer fools or thin skins. To underline my point, a thick skin is required of all that make the effort to post, to post pictures and stand the replies. :)

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