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Cutting top plate (s)


catnip
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I have some spruce that I want to make at least two tops from. (160 mm x 50 mm x 460 mm) I was thinking of cutting some base bars first since its width is quite generous then cutting it down the middle into two pieces from which I can make a diagonal cut. ( see picture)

post-24376-1240884776_thumb.jpg

The grain is quite even and straight so book matching is not going to be an issue.

post-24376-1240884671_thumb.jpg

Any other suggestions?

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You have in your diagram the plates coming to a sharp point at E, D and C, which is a waste, since plate edges are 4 plus mm thick.

I would cut out from clear plastic some 'plate end-view' templates, the shape of regular cut plates everyone gets from dealers, and lay them out on the end-grain of your block, and then you see how to best go about your cutting. The templates should have 4 sides, and not 3 like in your diagram.

Is it going to be for a violin or viola?

A violin plate does not need to be 25 mm at it's thickest point.

If violin, then you should be able to get some block and linings out of it as well, since your block is so long.

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If the width is 160, you probably could go down to zero as you suggest. Two other considerations are the split of the wood,(and trying to stay parallel to it), and whether you want toreverse the grain on one of your tops. The more conventional way is to bookmatch with the outermost (closest to tree bark) wood meeting at center joint. Your method will produce one the opposite, or 2 mixed tops. I can't tell you how much difference this makes, if any. There certainly are successful violins with 1 piece tops, but you should at least be aware of it.

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NewNewbie's suggestion is a good one. I would also suggest you have a new resaw blade for your ban saw and spend some time setting it up. A resaw blade is skip toothed and can carry the saw dust out of the cut where a regular blade doesn't and the blade gets clogged. Then the blade wants to wander and not cut straight. You may already know all this, I just thought I'd through it in. Good luck.

Berl

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I would also suggest you have a new resaw blade for your ban saw and spend some time setting it up. A resaw blade is skip toothed and can carry the saw dust out of the cut where a regular blade doesn't and the blade gets clogged. Then the blade wants to wander and not cut straight. You may already know all this, I just thought I'd through it in. Good luck.

Berl

Thanks Berl for the info. No I did not know this. I am using a 5/8" blade with 3 TPI and seems to cut straight. I have a vacuum hose attached under the table that sucks most of the sawdust.

And thanks NewNewbie for the template idea. In the past, even on standard spruce billets there is so much waste in cutting and carving plates. I always keep a couple long strips from each spruce billet ( only 4 so far) for future analysis. So far I have only been measuring the density using Archimedes principle of displacement.

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And thanks NewNewbie for the template idea. So far I have only been measuring the density using Archimedes principle of displacement.

Your Welcome.

Try 'candeling' your wood just to make sure that you have a uniform density, since calculating using Archimedes principle of displacement gives an overall average for the piece of wood.

What type of bandsaw do you have? The small saws benefit from using low tension Swedish Silicon Steel, such as Timber Wolf blades.

I say this because the band if not tensioned right will drift or bow in the cut. Dull teeth help to increase this.

Timber Wolf Blades

Lee Valley sell the same blade but under a different name.

Viking Blades

Here is another top blade.

Wood Slicer

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What type of bandsaw do you have? The small saws benefit from using low tension Swedish Silicon Steel, such as Timber Wolf blades.

Lee Valley sell the same blade but under a different name.

Viking Blades

I have a 14" Toolex Bandsaw ( Chinese clone of a Jet ) with a Tuffkot Swedish 93 1/4 " blade 5/8 - 3 TPI I am thinking of getting one of Lee Valley Bandsaw blades Resaw Blade

Are these Woodslicer blades with a different name?

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I have a 14" Toolex Bandsaw ( Chinese clone of a Jet ) with a Tuffkot Swedish 93 1/4 " blade 5/8 - 3 TPI I am thinking of getting one of Lee Valley Bandsaw blades Resaw Blade

Are these Woodslicer blades with a different name?

I would think that if they were Wood Slicers in disguise, then Lee Valley would say so, since they mention that Viking are the same as Timberwolf.

You can always email Lee Valley as they have excellent customer service.

I think the Wood Slicer has a more aggressive hook on it to help clear away saw dust, and the kerf is thinner than the Timberwolf blades, which is not needed if you are only cutting in a straight line. When you start to cut curves, the thicker kerf helps the blade to not bind in the cut as you turn it.

I would look at getting a stiffer spring for your Bandsaw as a nice upgrade.

I have a 14" Delta Bandsaw, and the max I run on it, with the upgraded spring, is 1/2" since these small saws do not have very rigid frames.

When you go to 5/8" blade you also usually get an increase in the thickness as well as the depth of the blade, which ends up being a big jump in the amount of tension required to run them properly.

Then those co-planar wheels get pulled out of plane when the saws frame bends, and things start to go downhill from there.

Cobra Coil

This will allow you to run the blade at a higher tension which gives the blade more Beam Strength, and yet you will still have some shock absorption left in the spring, which is important for a clean on the line cut.

Here are some tips on resawing.

Tune-up Tips for Bandsaws

The never ending debate about blades:

Thread at WoodNet Forums

If you do decide to spend some money, and you want to stretch your dollar, then this thread on sharpening blades is an interesting read.

SawMill Creek thread

I think that you are best off with the Low Tension Timberwolf blades, since your saw will match these blades better, and then you will get the best performance out of the 'saw and blade' combined.

Forgot to add this link on resawing. It is a PDF file.

Wood Slicer tips on resawing.

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Thanks for all the bandsaw tips ...

I have decided to cut my billet as follows. The "A"'s will be standard bookmatched top and the "B"'s will be close to bookmatched but the grain lines will be reversed ... a bit tighter on the outside and a bit looser on the center line.

post-24376-1241044321_thumb.jpg

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How come the grain lines will be reversed on the B cut? I have a big piece of curly i am going to cut in the same way. Why will the the grain lines not match up?

I guess I did not explain this very well. The grain lines in "B" will match but since there is a slight variation in grain line count from 20 per in on the left side to 15 lines per in on the right side. So the "B" plates will have tight grain on the outside and slightly looser grain in the central area. Normally the tight grain is found along the center line... that's all I meant.

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Ran across this thread on a new blade called the Blade Runner by Iturra designs. Sorta like the Wood Slicer.

They also talk about 1/2" vs 3/4" and how it's the thickness of the blade that makes the difference tension-wise.

Blade Runner by Iturra Designs

Both his blade, the Blade Runner, and the Wood Slicer are only 0.022" thick ( 0.5588 mm) while most 3/4" blades are 0.032 to 0.035" thick ( 0.8128 to 0.889 mm).

============================

Just got reminded of this nice blade.

Click on specials at the bottom of page.

It's called The Little Ripper Blade.

"When resawing or cutting straight, we recommend our 5/8” x .025” x 3TPI tungsten impregnated silicon blade. It will make the cut cleaner and faster than a normal bandsaw blade. Extra hard, stays sharp and cuts straight. It is extra wide to add stiffness to the blade, has a thin kerf and cuts extremely smooth."

As you can see that there is now a few re-saw blades that cater to the small 14" bandsaw, with the thinner metal thickness of around 0.025".

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