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Fractional Violin


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I've had this fiddle gathering dust for a while now. It's about 32 cm LOB; unlabeled and with a post crack on top. Inside the violin a nice looking bridge is sliding around, which is stamped "...H Wurlitzer" There are no back cracks. There are linings but I can't see well enough into it to tell if there are corner blocks.

Is it worth the trouble?

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It would depend on how you value your time. From a strict dollar and cents point of view, it's probably not justifiable.I suspect you could buy a healthier comparable one for well under a thousand. But it doesn't look like junk either, so could be a good piece for someone to gain experience with.BTW, probably was made on outside form and I wouldn't be surprised to see fake corner blocks

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(edit) I think that people assume that the amount of plate edge over the ribs (overhang) tells the story. If the ribs appear inset (smaller silhouette than the plates) they assume an outside form. However, it's also easy to end up with large overhang if the ribs have been damaged, and improperly reassembled/shortened (or blocks moved in) for whatever (repair) reason.

Since we can't see the ribs (here, and a judment has been made without seeing them), maybe I don't understand the concept correctly?

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12.5 inches makes for a short violin but I say string it up. If it doesn't sound full and sonorous with harmonics wafting through the concert hall then it may just be the perfect fiddle for a kid to learn on anyway. Give it to some youth music program even (gulp) if it's made on an outside form......

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Most people assume that the amount of plate edge over the ribs (overhang) tells the story. If the ribs appear inset (smaller silhouette than the plates) they assume an outside form.

Why would this indicate an outside mold? Aren't the ribs always smaller than the plates no matter which type of mold is used?

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Why would this indicate an outside mold?

Do you know the answer - how to tell what type of mold was used? I don't. I thought that PERHAPS in a factory setting an outside form was left on (garland with no blocks - no strong structure - needs support) when closing the box, so the plates overshoot more because everything is being done quickly with a mold obstructing edge work. Has anyone ever posted an outside mold image here? I would greatly appreciate if someone with knowledge would respond. :)

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I could tell by touching the computer screen and discerning the harmonics of the ribs :)

I don't know any hard and fast rules to tell an outside mold was used. It looks like a Bohemian violin of some sort, and the the rib mitres appear long. There are very good instruments made with outside molds, so I didn't mean to imply it was worthless because of that.

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I like Troutabout's suggestion. Since the job is beyond me, I think I will give it to a luthier friend who "rescues" instruments like this one and readies them for school strings programs. It doesn't seem like a bad little fiddle; at least the back is in very good shape.

Thanks, everyone.

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