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zefir68

Stradivarius 1713

12 posts in this topic

Why are so many of the VSOs labeled as "Stradivarius 1713"? Was it an exceptional year for him, as opposed to 1712 or 1714?

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Wasn't that the year he took a working vacation in Czechoslovakia, and got a whole lot done?

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Could be a decision that was made in Czechoslovakia ...

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Wasn't that the year he took a working vacation in Czechoslovakia, and got a whole lot done?

:) That must be it. I think he also stopped in Romania as well, to get that Transylvanian wood that made his violins sing like the mating calls of gorillas that would crescendo through the forest, the harmonics building upon each other. Only 1713 violins can apparently do that. :)

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:) That must be it. I think he also stopped in Romania as well, to get that Transylvanian wood that made his violins sing like the mating calls of gorillas that would crescendo through the forest, the harmonics building upon each other. Only 1713 violins can apparently do that. :)

And the story goes that upon his return from Transexual Transylvania, the man went crazy and kept doing the Time Warp again... (it's just a JUMP to the LEFT!)

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Why are so many of the VSOs labeled as "Stradivarius 1713"? Was it an exceptional year for him, as opposed to 1712 or 1714?

Is this true?

I don't study knock-off label dates, so I do not know. If true, I would imagine that it is a sampling issue. How many copies have you seen?

Also, a few large workshops can flood the market and promote even more copies using their dates.

Mike

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"I would imagine that it is a sampling issue. How many copies have you seen?

Also, a few large workshops can flood the market and promote even more copies using their dates."

I have seen thousands of Strad-labeled instruments, and I agree with the observation that the 1713 date shows up a lot more frequently than random chance would dictate. And I think it is for precisely the reason you suggest: a few large-production workshops used this date. The question is: Why did they pick 1713? I can't think of any reason other than that this date is approximately in the middle of Strad's "golden years."

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It could be that a pattern of a 1713 Strad was widely circulated. Or that they liked the harmonics of that special number. It adds up to 12 which is significant for Euclidean geometry, as well as for Christianity. It just sounds good. Also, it was the year for the great comet.

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1713 was during Stradivari's famous Jackson-Guldan era before he met Dr. Niagravary (or was it Viagrnary ?). You should of this be me speaking directly.

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A 1713 instrument was probably what the factory had access to for producing a reasonable facsimile, and they got a deal printing in quantity the 1713 lables, first price break at 1,000,000. Of course being thrifty and practical minded, they would have used these up first before re-printing some different ones.

As stupid as this sounds, there probably is some vestige of truth in this supposition.

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"It could be that a pattern of a 1713 Strad was widely circulated."

"A 1713 instrument was probably what the factory had access to..."

I think that this explanation is unlikely, because I don't think that these mass-produced instruments bear much resemblance to a 1713 (or any other year) Strad.

"Or that they liked the harmonics of that special number. It adds up to 12 which is significant for Euclidean geometry, as well as for Christianity."

I like this explanation much better.

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"It could be that a pattern of a 1713 Strad was widely circulated."

"A 1713 instrument was probably what the factory had access to..."

I think that this explanation is unlikely, because I don't think that these mass-produced instruments bear much resemblance to a 1713 (or any other year) Strad.

I have my doubts, but possibly the first few were somewhat accurate, until they no longer had access to the original templates. Once copies of copies started occurring the whole system deteriorated rather quickly. I doubt they were concerned with producing accurate copies anyways, The main goal was to produce "the peoples fiddle" , and lots of them quickly to meet demand. What would a farmer, village fiddler, or music student know about what a genuine Stradivari 1713 looked or sounded like? If it had strings, you could lift it to place under your chin, and it made some sort of sound, mission accomplished.

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