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Violinists studying guitar


MingLoo

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I'm back to studying classical guitar again; I started before and quit due to developing too thick callouses. I acquired a really nice guitar, however, and decided not to back off again, since the music is so beautiful. I wonder how many violinists/violists also play guitar?

I guess I'm studying the guitar because it's beautiful (primarily), and it's useful from the standpoint of understanding commercial and classical music, and adds another perspective to theoretical studies in harmony. And then there's the obvious parallel between the early development of the violin, and 20th century jazz and electronic instruments and equipment. It's useful to know about for commercial conducting gigs, and I also might be able to teach Suzuki guitar in four or five years, if I continue.

One of the books I purchased to study the guitar is the Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer. While much of this book is historically interesting, in terms of understanding commercial music, and much is also useful in studying classical guitar, I discovered something about my own tastes: I just profoundly am not interested in, and do not wish to study (or hear) pop music, specifically rock bands and genres of that sort.

This music, which has such wide appeal, just is not beautiful or appealing to me. It does not favorably compare (for example), with the Mozart Divertimenti I'm preparing with my students, for recital. This is no doubt due to my inherent bad character and snobbishness.

:)

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I'm back to studying classical guitar again; I started before and quit due to developing too thick callouses. I acquired a really nice guitar, however, and decided not to back off again, since the music is so beautiful. I wonder how many violinists/violists also play guitar?

I guess I'm studying the guitar because it's beautiful (primarily), and it's useful from the standpoint of understanding commercial and classical music, and adds another perspective to theoretical studies in harmony. And then there's the obvious parallel between the early development of the violin, and 20th century jazz and electronic instruments and equipment. It's useful to know about for commercial conducting gigs, and I also might be able to teach Suzuki guitar in four or five years, if I continue.

One of the books I purchased to study the guitar is the Guitar Handbook by Ralph Denyer. While much of this book is historically interesting, in terms of understanding commercial music, and much is also useful in studying classical guitar, I discovered something about my own tastes: I just profoundly am not interested in, and do not wish to study (or hear) pop music, specifically rock bands and genres of that sort.

This music, which has such wide appeal, just is not beautiful or appealing to me. It does not favorably compare (for example), with the Mozart Divertimenti I'm preparing with my students, for recital. This is no doubt due to my inherent bad character and snobbishness.

:)

Hi Ming Loo,

it's the opposite with me ...

I have learned to play classical guitar in my youth for 6 years but was very interested to play and make the violin. Now as an adult I have decided to learn cello two years ago and I love it very much. Since december 2008 I am learning the violin and I love it like learning the cello. So if you have any questions about the classical guitar don't hesitate .....

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I don't play much classical guitar but I do love to play flamenco, even though I'm no good at it. I should also state that I'm a cellist, not a violinist or violist (maybe I just have no business in this thread after all :) ). What little classical I do play is often centered around material that was actually written for guitar; hearing Bach's cello suites played on guitar, although pretty, reminds me why the classical guitar simply isn't up to the task of orchestral roles.

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I've had several periods in my musical life where I considered guitar my primary instrument. I've learned a number of different styles of guitar, from '70s rock through electric and acoustic blues, folk and bluegrass, and classical (mostly renaissance pieces; I love the polyphony). I wish I could work on both guitar and violin but I know I don't have the time to concentrate seriously on more than one instrument, so for the last 10 years or so have been concentrating solely on violin (which was my first instrument). The guitars come out occasionally but usually they just remind me how much I've forgotten! Maybe when I retire I'll work on my classical guitar chops again.

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