Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Looking for good ideas for solo violin wedding music


CelloPaul

Recommended Posts

A friend of mine has been asked to play at a wedding and she wants some ideas of suitable pieces for solo violin - possibly for coming in, register signing and maybe going out to. Not too hard - ideally sounds harder than it really is!! Nerves will be involved!

I've thought of Elgar "Salut d'Amour" or "Chanson de Matin".

Does anyone else have any ideas - something you've heard or played?

Thanks

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is a nice collection, and includes the following works:

The Violinist's Wedding Album for Violin and Keyboard

Contents

Canon composed by Johann Pachelbel

Trumpet Tune composed by Henry Purcell

Trumpet Voluntary composed by Jeremiah Clarke

Prelude composed by Marc-Antoine Charpentier, from Te Deum.

Arioso composed by J.S. Bach

Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring composed by J.S. Bach

Largo composed by Antonio Vivaldi, from Winter.

Air on the G String composed by J.S. Bach

Rondeau composed by Jean Joseph Mouret

Wedding March composed by Richard Wagner

Ave Maria composed by Franz Schubert

Ave Maria composed by Bach-Gounod

Ode to Joy composed by Beehoven

Entrance of the Queen of Sheba composed by G.F. Handel

Wedding March composed by Felix Mendelssohn

Sheep May Safely Graze composed by J.S. Bach

Water Music Selections composed by G.F. Handel, Air, Bourree, Hornpipe I, Hornpipe II.

La Rejouissance composed by G.F. Handel, from The Royal Fireworks Msic.

Wachet Auf composed by J.S. Bach

Alleluja composed by W.A. Mozart, from Exultate Jubliate.

Andante composed by W.A. Mozart, from Piano Concerto 21.

Panis Angelicus composed by Cesar Franck

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are a number of not-to-difficult pieces to choose from within the Sonatas and Partitas for Solo Violin from J.S. Bach. Some are slow and contemplative, while others are bright and uplifting. The Andante from Sonata No.2 in A minor is one in particular that comes to mind. It is a beautiful piece of music and entirely fitting for the occasion.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I played my sister's wedding, and I used the book that MingLoo linked above. However, I found a version of Pachelbel's Canon in D on Sibelius that was much prettier...it was a more polyphonic translation.

I threw in a few Scottish Airs...the audience loved those the most, I think, since they were something different. Songs like "Neil Gow's Lament for the Death of his Second Wife", "Coilsfield House", "The Hills of Lorne", "Hector the Hero", etc.

The Wedding March sounds thin and uninspiring on violin. Leave that one to the church organ if you want grand. On violin it's a very...simple...tune.

You will of course have to learn Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring along with Canon in D.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I threw in a few Scottish Airs...the audience loved those the most, I think, since they were something different. Songs like "Neil Gow's Lament for the Death of his Second Wife", "Coilsfield House", "The Hills of Lorne", "Hector the Hero", etc.

Definitely a good idea, since these simple tunes sound fine with violin alone without piano or any other accompaniment. Also add Irish airs to the list, including Star of the County Down.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you write "solo violin", do you mean unaccompanied violin? People seem to be answering different questions here. Most of the pieces in this thread would sound quite lonely without a piano accompaniment, but there are other pieces that are actually written for solo violin.

++++++++++++

Exactly,

It is not a place to play violin solo in a wedding setting unless you are accompanied by a piano or other strings..

It is hard to impress the audience.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

++++++++++++

Exactly,

It is not a place to play violin solo in a wedding setting unless you are accompanied by a piano or other strings..

It is hard to impress the audience.

Ain't that the truth. I didn't really want to play solo, particularly at my rather meager talent level. My sister insisted though. Some pieces I had organist accompaniment on, and she was terrific, given the fact that I live "long distance" and never had an opportunity to practice with her.

It took some doing to convince my sister that indeed she did NOT want me to play the wedding march for her.

I received lots of compliments, but I'm still somewhat sheepish about it, as I do think that my lone fiddle didn't impress all that much. But...the Scottish tunes were undeniably the best, though they weren't traditional wedding fare.

Also, look into a violin arrangement of the Bach Cello Suites. The prelude for the first suite is particularly nice, and the cello suites are far easier than the S&Ps. (The S&Ps are really quite beyond me...at least beyond my confidence to play in public. I struggle through those on my own "personal development" time, or whenever I want to despair for my playing ability and hate myself for not being better. :) )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A friend of mine has been asked to play at a wedding and she wants some ideas of suitable pieces for solo violin - possibly for coming in, register signing and maybe going out to. Not too hard - ideally sounds harder than it really is!! Nerves will be involved!

I've thought of Elgar "Salut d'Amour" or "Chanson de Matin".

Does anyone else have any ideas - something you've heard or played?

Thanks

++++++++++++++

The guests in a wedding are not necessary concert goers. They talk, eat and drink in the gethering.

If you play violin solo music you better have enough volume to cover the noise. Then you are in the same

play field.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 10 years later...

Can your friend play a solo violin cover? For example, you can find some very touching romantic songs in the Net that could be played. They will be even better if your friend decides to make a cover on any of them!

Edited by Namie
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 years later...

Hello! Thank you for the ideas! 

First three I played on Stentor 1500 (second one here) at my sister's wedding.

I also recommend:

1. "Canon in D, P.37," by Johann Pachelbel, The Violin Sisters

2. A Midsummer Night's Dream, Op. 61: IX. Wedding March," by Felix Mendelssohn, Legend The Band

3. "Can't Help Falling In Love With You" by Elvis, Alan Ng

4. "Clair De Lune" by Claude Debussy, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, Sandra Rivers

5. "You Are The Reason" by Calum Scott, Daniel Jen

6. "Moon River" by Andy Williams, Manuel & The Music Of The Mountains

7. "Amazing Grace" by John Newton, The Violin Sisters

8. "Thinking Out Loud" by Ed Sheeran, Daniel Jang

9. "Deux Arabesques, L.66: Premiere Arabesque" by Claude Debussy, Federico Guglielmo, Jolanda Violante

10. "Love Me Like You Do" by Ellie Goulding, Brooklyn Duo

Edited by Willh5080
UPD
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lots of great selections already mentioned and some are almost required pieces at weddings. 

May I suggest you get accompanied by a guitar or piano as it will sound much better than a single instrument.

My spouse and I play when asked to play at some venues and it sounds so much better.

There so many musicians out there awaiting the chance to play. My son was a first chair trombonist (Armstrong Atlantic Youth Orchestra) back in High School and now getting back to playing in a quartet and they play venues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

2 hours ago, GeorgeH said:

"Give Me Your Hand" was actually written by Rory Dall O'Cahan.

Was it?  Fair enough.  So many things seem to get attributed to him, but then he was very prolific, and at least some of his tunes might have been re-workings of older tunes and so-on.  I'm just never sure exactly what is his or not.  

Anyway, it's the classic choice for weddings, but there are lots of other tunes like planxty irwin or fanny power or ealenor plunkett that often get played.  

And lots more besides that get neglected but would fit nicely like maybe O'Carolans draught or his dream.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

@Bardan

It is a beautiful tune, one of my favorites, and often attributed to O'Carolan. It has an amusing story (legend?) behind it:

 

Captain Francis O'Neill[3] suggests

Proud and spirited, he resented anything in the nature of trespass on his dignity. Among his visits to the houses of Scottish nobility, he is said to have called at Eglinton Castle, Ayrshire. Knowing he was a harper, but being unaware of his rank, Lady Eglinton commanded him to play a tune. Taking oftence at her peremptory manner, Ó Catháin refused and left the castle. When she found out who her guest was her ladyship sought and effected a speedy reconciliation. This incident furnished a theme for one of the harper’s best compositions. “Tabhair Damh do Lámh,” or “Give Me Your Hand!” The name has been latinized into “Da Mihi Manum.” The fame of the composition and the occasion which gave birth to it reaching the ear of King James the Sixth, induced him to send for the composer. Ó Catháin accordingly attended at the Scottish court, and created a sensation.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...