Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Pirastro Passion Strings


fiddleD125
 Share

Recommended Posts

Could anyone who has had experience with Pirastro Passion violin strings please give their opininion of the strings?

Well, I'm a little disappointed in Passiones. Although they are better than most synthetic strings, they don't beat Olivs - which, in my opinion, have the most complexity of sound. They both seem to project about the same, but Passiones are brighter and not as rich, in my opinion - especially in higher positions. And since Passiones cost almost as much as Olivs, to me it's worth spending a bit more...

Having said that, however, the Oliv A really is upsetting - only because it starts to unwind usually within a week. Even so, I haven't found a better sounding A...of course, then there's the problem of constant tuning...oy vey. When are they going to invent miracle string? :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like Passiones, but I would also agree that Olivs sound great too. The advantage with Passiones is a robust A-string, much better tuning stability, and they blend with the steel E better on my violin. I found they needed a couple of weeks to open up and I think they'll also sound good a lot longer than any synthetic, so are probably good value.

When are they going to invent miracle string?

I find it incredible that we still play on steel E-strings. Is there really nothing better available today?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tried plain gut and I like them, but I always take them off again. For me, modern strings give me more of what I'm looking for.

The steel E is OK, it's what we're used to and it works, but I would like to see a modern version of a plain gut E, with the complexity and sweetness of the gut combined with durability and 'edge' of the steel.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've tried plain gut and I like them, but I always take them off again. For me, modern strings give me more of what I'm looking for.

The steel E is OK, it's what we're used to and it works, but I would like to see a modern version of a plain gut E, with the complexity and sweetness of the gut combined with durability and 'edge' of the steel.

I totally agree with this. I would really love to see some new E string technology. At the moment, I use Goldbrokat 25 - which sounds very sweet at first, then after a week....a new one goes on. They're cheap, but when they go bad - it's pretty piercing...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could anyone who has had experience with Pirastro Passion violin strings please give their opininion of the strings?

I tried them on my fiddle and liked them, but wasn't wowed by them.

Overall, I thought they sounded nicer than Obligatos, but not as nice as Evahs.

As expected, they took about a week (maybe a little more) to play in.

The best thing about them was that I found that they lasted considerably longer than Evahs. They maintained a good sound for quite a while. I had them on my violin for about 6 months, but they should have been changed sooner.

In the end, I went back to my tried and true Evahs. Even though the Passiones lasted longer, when you factor in the price premium and the fact that I liked the sound of Evahs better, I went back to my old favorite.

YMMV

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DeepBlue-- how would you describe the difference between Evahs and other strings? I have been using Obligatos for a few months and I like them, but I am always curious about other strings. Why did you like the Evahs better than the Passione strings? And have you ever tried Obligatos? How would you describe the difference between those and Evahs?

Thanks,

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favorite among the "new strings" (Dogal, Passione, Warchal, VisionSolo) is the Vision Solo set. Usually I do not use the E string from a set, but with the Vision Solos, I do.

The other strings I've mentioned above I find are just fine (although for me the Passiones have the same climate-stability problems of all gut-core strings), but they are more violin specific (like Dominants, Evahs, and Obligatios).

I find the Vision Solos voice well on violins with a deep, bold voice as well as those with a more treble overtones.

Another interesting new string is the Larsen Tzigane - awful on some instruments, but on two violins I have that had a bit of trouble sounding good way up the G string with all more familiar strings, the Tzigane set brought those violins into good comparison with my best violins.

October 2009 update: I have installed an old set of Olives (gut core) that I had around the house on one of my violins. Of course it does take a week or more for the gut core to finally stretch out to its equilibrium length, and constant retuning is required until it does. After that, the natural gut materia does take up water (or shed it) with humidity change (just the way bow hair does) so if you leave home to play in a different climatic condition (like higher/lower temperature or air conditioned halls) keeping the instrument in tune is a problem for at least the first hour. I used gut-core (Eudoxa and Olive [Gold Label didn't work right for me]) exclusively until about the mid 1970s.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 months later...
Could anyone who has had experience with Pirastro Passion violin strings please give their opininion of the strings?

I just got a set, and I'm highlly impressed with their sound. Perhaps this is true about my violin, although I didn't try eudoxa or Olive on this violin.

My violin dealer said they are better than Olive and Eudoxa and that the Germans did their job well, at producing them.

But still, after reading some of the comments on this thread (just now found it after a search), I see my feelings (and my violin dealers words) are not confirmed by others.

I'd be interested to hear more on this.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, the string of choice does in large part depend upon the violin, and the setup. Over time I have used plain gut, Eudoxa, Passione and Oliv (and in synthetics Larsen, Evah, Helicore, Dominant and others I cannot remember at the moment). One violin I used to play was very nice with Eudoxa (and in sythetics the Dominants), but the one I play now likes Oliv's over all else (with a plain gut A). It was just about as good with Passione strings, and also pretty darn good with Larsen synthetics (not the Tzigane variety), but only so-so with Evah's.

As for gut vs. synthetic, I find gut has much more character, a much more maleable sound and far better carrying power, which is NOT quite the same thing as pain under the ear!!! Loud under the ear does not translate into carrying power. What you need in a sound that carries is complexity, not sheer noise. Gut delivers this complexity of sound quite well, which in the proper violin and with the proper technique will carry like no other.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just removed the Passione strings from my viola this evening - it takes me so long to retune several times a day - it had been less than two weeks, so I didn't give them the full time that Jack R said it took him to break them in, but I gave up. On my older viola, they just didn't sound too hot. Nice and loud, and not a bad sound, but for this little fiddle, other strings seem to sound better. Perhaps when I have a few weeks with no playing with friends, etc., I will try them again.

A luthier told me that gut strings do not do well in this dry climate (Denver), but I thought perhaps, since this instrument had known only gut strings for about 160 years of it's life, that it would be happy having them again. Passione are good strings, though, and I may send them to my sister on the Oregon coast - not so dry there! :)

Shirley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does take gut a while to break in, but once it does it is nearly as stable as any other string. People who cannot wait the two weeks or so for a new string to settle in will often have another violin strung with gut, from which they can pull a string if needed, to be replaced with another new one on the second violin, to await the next time a ready-to-go string is called upon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does take gut a while to break in, but once it does it is nearly as stable as any other string. People who cannot wait the two weeks or so for a new string to settle in will often have another violin strung with gut, from which they can pull a string if needed, to be replaced with another new one on the second violin, to await the next time a ready-to-go string is called upon.

In contrast, I have always found gut strings unstable enough to be annoying if I had to move between venues of different humidity. For me, it would involve playing once a week in an air-controlled (dry) environment. It takes at least an hour for gut strings to re-stabilize, even if they have been on the instrument forever. If you can store a fiddle at the AC facility, I guess it would work out OK.

I used gut strings exclusively (finallly - Eudoxa and Olive exclusively) from 1940 - 1980+ and that was my experience. I have recently restrung one violin with Olives, but it will rarely leave home. I was not overwhelmed by the Passione strings. I feel I get a richer tone (at least under the ear and playing it "cello style") with the Olives. On assorted violins, I also got stronger tone with Vision Solo or Dogal - depending on which instrument - (not to particularly recommend those strings, it's just what I was trying at the same time the Passiones first came out).

I will give the Passiones another try on some fiddle when I think it's time to restring.

Andy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Manfio - that D string was the bane of my existence for the ten days I had it on my viola. Overnight the last day it came completely loose (not the peg). That's when I gave up. Your description of Passione's strengths was as I found them. Shirley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, it`s a pity, because they produced a very rich, luscious sound on my violas... Professional players need reliable strings and instruments.

Toby Appel told me in NY last month that he is helping Fan Tao (Daddario) to develop new viola strings, that are not in the market yet, I hope they will succeed in doing that because it`s hard to depend on products sold in Euros when the dollar is weak...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Toby Appel told me in NY last month that he is helping Fan Tao (Daddario) to develop new viola strings, that are not in the market yet, I hope they will succeed in doing that because it`s hard to depend on products sold in Euros when the dollar is weak...

D'addario makes the string which has been my favorite for a while, Zyex, and I appreciate the heads-up concerning their new viola product. Shirley

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...