Sign in to follow this  
allegro

Advice sought

Recommended Posts

Hi All

My daughter tried two violins today, both good violins for professional level playing and they cost approximately the same. One has no label except a stamp London and has some repaired cracks (good job done). The other is with a label Andreas Ferdinand Mayr, believe to be a genuine Mary - he is supposed to be the maker who made Mozart's first violin. The no name one sounds a bit louder and brighter than the Mayr but not as sweet and as warm. My daughter is inclide towards the no name violin but we are worried that the repair might caused problems later. Would you buy the no oame violin or would you logically go for the Mayr violin.

Incidentally, I tried to look for the price of Mayr violin on the price page and there is none. Is it so rare?

Cheers,

Allegro

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well repaired cracks (other than soundpost or bass bar cracks) shouldn't cause any problems. I'm always curious to see what type of strings are on instruments. Differences in strings can often make big differences in the way an instrument sounds.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think of it as an investment. If your daughter is very young, and may decide to stop playing, you would be able to sell a violin with a label and authentication much easier than a cracked no-name violin (and it would at least retain it's value). While I would personally buy the one that sounds better, this situation seems a little different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm afraid you haven't supplied enough info for anyone to give you an accurate answer. Most old fiddles have some cracks, where are they? And who is it that believes the Mayr is genuine.I think you should be able to find a violin that both sounds good and has the expectation of holding it's value, but you probably need to show theses to a pro for an opinion.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm afraid you haven't supplied enough info for anyone to give you an accurate answer. Most old fiddles have some cracks, where are they? And who is it that believes the Mayr is genuine.I think you should be able to find a violin that both sounds good and has the expectation of holding it's value, but you probably need to show theses to a pro for an opinion.

Thanks, Andrew. Both violins are from a very reputable dealer and so I have no doubt that the Mayr is genuine.

Anyway, the violin with the repaired crack. The first crack I found was along the grain of the violin, starting from the foot of the bridge (closest to the E-string) to the edge of the violin. Approximately 8mm to the right of the crack, there is a parallel crack, approximately same starting point and finishing at the edge to the violin. Both has been repaired.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That sounds like a soundpost crack.

The only way to correctly repair that crack is to do a soundpost patch on the interior of the violin.

Make very sure that this was done before you consider this violin.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, Andrew. Both violins are from a very reputable dealer and so I have no doubt that the Mayr is genuine.

Anyway, the violin with the repaired crack. The first crack I found was along the grain of the violin, starting from the foot of the bridge (closest to the E-string) to the edge of the violin. Approximately 8mm to the right of the crack, there is a parallel crack, approximately same starting point and finishing at the edge to the violin. Both has been repaired.

One of the most important things is to find the dealer that you feel is reputable and trustworthy, and has a good after service reputation. Which it sounds you may have already done. Confirm that through other musicians. Violins need looking after long after the purchase. Maybe the Mayr will crack next week, Who knows?

when you've found someone that you can trust will look after you, you can comfortably buy the violin your daughter likes most.

If the violin is thought of as an investment, then you buy the label inside it, but certainly not with out a certificate of authenticity. And maybe even paper trails of provinence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks, Andrew. Both violins are from a very reputable dealer and so I have no doubt that the Mayr is genuine.

Anyway, the violin with the repaired crack. The first crack I found was along the grain of the violin, starting from the foot of the bridge (closest to the E-string) to the edge of the violin. Approximately 8mm to the right of the crack, there is a parallel crack, approximately same starting point and finishing at the edge to the violin. Both has been repaired.

If the dealer is reputable (as you mentioned), I'm sure they would be willing to review the condition of the instruments with you. They should also be able to tell you how the existing repairs were accomplished,how stable they are, and how they might effect value.

If they aren't willing to do this, find a dealer who is.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Incidentally, I tried to look for the price of Mayr violin on the price page and there is none. Is it so rare?

A quick search of the major auction houses found only one record:

Sotheby's July 2003 Lot 236, estimate 2800-3500 GBP, hammer price 8400 GBP. There is more information and a photo of the back on Sotheby's page:

http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/lot/LotDe...sp?lot_id=42HTZ

Link to a photo of Mozart's child-size violin:

http://www.jamd.com/image/g/56650857

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If the dealer is reputable (as you mentioned), I'm sure they would be willing to review the condition of the instruments with you. They should also be able to tell you how the existing repairs were accomplished,how stable they are, and how they might effect value.

If they aren't willing to do this, find a dealer who is.

Thanks, Jeffrey. We went to the shop again and he went through the violin thoroughly and told me about the repaired crack. It a stable repair but we have lost interest in that violin.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A quick search of the major auction houses found only one record:

Sotheby's July 2003 Lot 236, estimate 2800-3500 GBP, hammer price 8400 GBP. There is more information and a photo of the back on Sotheby's page:

http://www.sothebys.com/app/live/lot/LotDe...sp?lot_id=42HTZ

Link to a photo of Mozart's child-size violin:

http://www.jamd.com/image/g/56650857

Thanks, violinfan. The price is comparable to what the dealer is asking for.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi All

My daughter tried two violins today, both good violins for professional level playing and they cost approximately the same. One has no label except a stamp London and has some repaired cracks (good job done). The other is with a label Andreas Ferdinand Mayr, believe to be a genuine Mary - he is supposed to be the maker who made Mozart's first violin. The no name one sounds a bit louder and brighter than the Mayr but not as sweet and as warm. My daughter is inclide towards the no name violin but we are worried that the repair might caused problems later. Would you buy the no oame violin or would you logically go for the Mayr violin.

Incidentally, I tried to look for the price of Mayr violin on the price page and there is none. Is it so rare?

Cheers,

Allegro

++++++++++++++++++++

to

I visited violin shops often to try violins and when I had trouble to decide which one as a better of choice, the salelady

always advised me to buy both. I looked at her to see if she meant what she said. She usually played a few notes with a smile.

that is, let the violins do the talking.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I visited violin shops often to try violins and when I had trouble to decide which one as a better of choice, the salelady

always advised me to buy both. I looked at her to see if she meant what she said. She usually played a few notes with a smile.

that is, let the violins do the talking.

Anyway, we have discounted the one with the repaired crack but found another one which sounded good. Wish I have the money to buy both violins .......... :-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.