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polkat

Homemade bow rehair jig?

10 posts in this topic

Looking at pictures in the catalogs, it seems like it would be pretty easy to make one. Anyone done this? Thanks!

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I've made one similar to the Strobel one, but I don't use it much. Lynn Hannings teaches a rehair method that uses separate small holders for the head and frog (I made mine, but I believe she also sells them). Her method works great, and I can store all my rehair tools in a shoebox sized container!

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Looking at pictures in the catalogs, it seems like it would be pretty easy to make one. Anyone done this? Thanks!

I bought one, then made a hair clamp for the frog end, then reworked the tip holder and made a clamp to hold the tip still. So by the time you do all that, you could make one that's more suitable. I started hairing a violin bow yesterday whose tip is, strangely, a little too large for the bed of the jig, so it is still not quite what I want it to be.

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I'm with Doug on this one. I made a full length jig, with a thread spool holder and a "hank sizer" similar to the Strobel book. It works OK, but the small separate head and frog jigs seem much easier to manage. Take a look at the Roger Foster DVD. I met him at the VSA convention this year and we chatted about rehairs for a bit. Good information in the DVD and you see how the small jigs are used. If I remember correctly, he has a pin in his workbench that holds the jigs in place, and it allows them to swivel around enough to be useful.

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"I'm with Doug on this one."

Me, too. I consider the typical one-piece long bow rehair jig much inferior to the separate head and frog holders, because it holds the head and the frog by clamping them which risks damaging them. The separate head and frog holders work without clamping. I will try to put up some pictures that will show you how you can make your own.

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Here's the frog holder. The frog cavity has a central flat-topped ridge so the bottom of the frog bears on its flat center section and not on the thin edges. The ridge has a hole for the eyelet. This holder fits violin, viola and cello frogs; I have a bigger one for bass. The frogs can wobble a bit from side to side, but this has never been a problem. I'll get the head holder after I replace my camera batteries.

post-4504-1229525412_thumb.jpg post-4504-1229525420_thumb.jpg

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Here's the head holder. The body is pivot-mounted to a wooden dowel which is inserted into a hole in the bench top. The cavity is padded with a leather lining. The head is held in place by a little pin across the throat. This fits violin bows. I have another for cello and a third for bass.

post-4504-1229535881_thumb.jpg post-4504-1229535891_thumb.jpg

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Thanks for that Brad. Good descriptive pictures! My only question is what tapering angle the tip holder has in it's depth, or is there any? Or does the question make sense?

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"My only question is what tapering angle the tip holder has in it's depth, or is there any? Or does the question make sense?"

I think you're asking about the shape of the cavity that the bow head rests in. After it's started, the way to determine the final shape is to try fitting various different-shaped bows in it. If the bows don't fit, keep carving out more wood until they do fit. You could wrap the heads in carbon paper to mark where the wood needs to be removed. And you will need to remove a bit extra to make room for the padding material.

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