Jump to content
Maestronet Forums

Antiques Roadshow - Depressing!


Dwight Brown

Recommended Posts

I was watching Antiques Roadshow and a woman brought in a rather plain factory made electric guitar. As it turned out it was a Fender Mustang from about 1958 or so, not the top of the line or anything, It was worth $30,000.00!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Good grief! It wasn't even cool looking. I'm never gonna understand some things.

DLB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's as about as understandable as the value of vintage violins. An ok-sounding violin that happens to be old and Italian (or made by a maker of note) can sell for obscene amounts of money. I do understand what you mean about vintage guitars, though. A vintage guitar that sports a certain color (that just happens to be rare) can sell for tens of thousands.

As we all know, sound has little or nothing to do with value...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"As it turned out it was a Fender Mustang from about 1958 or so, not the top of the line or anything, It was worth $30,000.00!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"

If you find that depressing, consider this: At the Skinner fall auction two years ago, a factory-made, non-celebrity-owned, Gibson solid body electric guitar, circa 1960, sold for $611,000.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it was the one I saw, it was actually a 1954 Esquire. I don't find anything depressing in these guitar prices. It's the same market forces that apply to violins and many other things. The Gibson Explorer that sold for so much was quite rare, and 2 stubborn people wanted it. Nobody knows what the future of guitar or violin markets will be, but considering that most people would rather listen to electric guitars over violins, it wouldn't be a surprise to see guitars continue to appreciate.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was watching Antiques Roadshow and a woman brought in a rather plain factory made electric guitar. As it turned out it was a Fender Mustang from about 1958 or so, not the top of the line or anything, It was worth $30,000.00!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Good grief! It wasn't even cool looking. I'm never gonna understand some things.

DLB

Couldn't have been a Mustang, they didn't come out until 1966, and no Mustang is worth $30,000. Even my 1958 Fender Musicmaster, a one pickup version with similar stylings, is worth maybe $2000. It must have been a Strat or Tele, and in that case that price is a fair assesment, same with Gibsons' from the 1960s costing over $500,000. Old guitars are cool too, I have a few. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Couldn't have been a Mustang, they didn't come out until 1966, and no Mustang is worth $30,000. Even my 1958 Fender Musicmaster, a one pickup version with similar stylings, is worth maybe $2000. It must have been a Strat or Tele, and in that case that price is a fair assesment, same with Gibsons' from the 1960s costing over $500,000. Old guitars are cool too, I have a few. :)

It wasn't a tele or strat that is what left me so suprized!

I will research as to what it was.

Dwight

It was a 1952 Fender Esquire. Here is the link:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/archive/200604A42.html

Still seems a bit weird.

DLB

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dwight, it's not weird at all. The Esquire was the forerunner of the Telecaster and there were only a handful made. In the seventies I remember the British journalist Charles Shaar Murray describing the Esquire as the only guitar that was cool enough to be used by Springsteen (on the basis that it was even cooler than the already pretty cool Telecaster because it only had one pickup). For this story to make sense you have to realise that at the time Springsteen was cooler than liquid helium. You may be too young to remember this (I wish I was!)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dwight, it's not weird at all. The Esquire was the forerunner of the Telecaster and there were only a handful made. In the seventies I remember the British journalist Charles Shaar Murray describing the Esquire as the only guitar that was cool enough to be used by Springsteen (on the basis that it was even cooler than the already pretty cool Telecaster because it only had one pickup). For this story to make sense you have to realise that at the time Springsteen was cooler than liquid helium. You may be too young to remember this (I wish I was!)

Cooler than liquid helium ! :) I guess it depends what circles you mixed in?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

... but 50 grand for an ordinary factory guitar? Come on...

The value of vintage Fender guitars has a lot to do with what happened later (i.e. production changes, company history, lower quality, etc.) as well as who played them and what they were used for. I have a 1971 Stratocaster (all original), and it'd probably be worth a lot more if it was 3 years older (i.e. 1968), even though it's for all intents and purposes the same guitar (same specs, etc.). As it is, it's worth more than a '75. And... yes, they were made in a factory, but they are NOT ordinary...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The value of vintage Fender guitars has a lot to do with what happened later (i.e. production changes, company history, lower quality, etc.) as well as who played them and what they were used for. I have a 1971 Stratocaster (all original), and it'd probably be worth a lot more if it was 3 years older (i.e. 1968), even though it's for all intents and purposes the same guitar (same specs, etc.). As it is, it's worth more than a '75. And... yes, they were made in a factory, but they are NOT ordinary...

Sweet! I have a 1980 Sunburst Strat, HEAVY, but actually a very nice guitar, contradicting what people always say about Fenders of that era. I also have a 1964 Jaguar including original manual with bill of sale written inside. Has lot of that "player wear" & "buckle rash", it's my favorite guitar. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The value of vintage Fender guitars has a lot to do with what happened later (i.e. production changes, company history, lower quality, etc.) as well as who played them and what they were used for. I have a 1971 Stratocaster (all original), and it'd probably be worth a lot more if it was 3 years older (i.e. 1968), even though it's for all intents and purposes the same guitar (same specs, etc.). As it is, it's worth more than a '75. And... yes, they were made in a factory, but they are NOT ordinary...

Yeah, but think about it; these guitars are only 40-50 years old and could easily be reproduced today (and have been). They were designed to be manufactured cheaply; there's nothing really special to them. I love old guitars too but that market's crazy!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That Jaguar WOULD be a nice axe! Wow. My Strat also has lots of relic mojo, and it's a Sunburst with a rosewood neck, I have to say I"ve always coveted the maple neck. Maybe someday... (sigh)...

My Strat has the Maple neck, it's nearly mint too. Black plastics changed to white, looks better. :)

stratocaster.jpg

Here is my Jag, full of Mojo with epic buckle rash. :)

jaguar.jpg

Both have original cases too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nice, Matt! Here's my beast. Okay, the knobs aren't orig, but everything else is (I've since put proper-look knobs on, but someday I'll get real vintage ones. Those'll probably cost me $100).

I don't have the original case, I bought this off a guy in 1974 for $300, he told me it was a '65. Most of the relic was on it when I bought it. I do have a '65 Super Reverb to play it through, tho...

gallery_24261_63_27683.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The really sick thing isn't the valuations you hear on Antiques Roadshow (to get back on-topic with the thread), but what's going on on E-bay in regards to partsing-out vintage instruments. Someone gets, say, a late 60's or early 70's Strad, takes it all apart, and sells the parts individually. The entire guitar is worth a WHOLE lot more that way. I did a search last evening, because I wanted to get a rough idea what my Strat might be worth, and what I saw curled my hair. A (claimed) '71 pickguard with pickups and controls (i.e. the "guts" of the guitar) was going for almost $1000 (and there were 11 bids, it wasn't just a "buy it now" price). At least most Strads and Del G's don't meet that sorry fate...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The really sick thing isn't the valuations you hear on Antiques Roadshow (to get back on-topic with the thread), but what's going on on E-bay in regards to partsing-out vintage instruments. Someone gets, say, a late 60's or early 70's Strad, takes it all apart, and sells the parts individually. The entire guitar is worth a WHOLE lot more that way. I did a search last evening, because I wanted to get a rough idea what my Strat might be worth, and what I saw curled my hair. A (claimed) '71 pickguard with pickups and controls (i.e. the "guts" of the guitar) was going for almost $1000 (and there were 11 bids, it wasn't just a "buy it now" price). At least most Strads and Del G's don't meet that sorry fate...

The other half of this is buying an "original" vintage guitar and discovering it was assembled from parts from various years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...