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C.B.Fiddler

Professional level Violin Duets - for church

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My wife and I are professional violinists that have exhausted our supply of well-written traditional duet repertoire (not that we have a whole lot!) Everything we find now is very simple or praise band stuff. Any suggestions?

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Since I don't know what you have or what church you're in I might be listing the obvious or offending you here, but anyway:

Mary Cohen published a collection of duets (without accompaniment) quite recently. It's in her Real Repertoire series. Some of those pieces might be useful.

The Telemann canon sonatas are great, especially some of the slow movements.

The Doflein method books are full of duets. Not all of them are suitable for church, but you should be able to find a couple of pearls in each volume.

Almost all the Edward Huws Jones folk music books (published by Boosey & Hawkes) have some slower, more anthem-like melodies in them. There are always two second violin parts to choose from, and with the more advanced one, you really get to play the violin!

A Danish Suzuki teacher, Marianne Rygner, has made all the Suzuki pieces (and some more) into violin duets -- ie the second violin plays a sort of b.c. part, mostly, but the arrangements are well written. http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/pages.html?c...amp;r=wwws-err5

The Leclair sonatas for two violins work well for church too, in my opinion.

Do you have a pianist or an organist? In that case, there is a lot more of course ...

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Accompanied and unaccomp is great either way (we have organ and piano.) The music we would like to see more would be based on the traditional hymns and anthems. We have a couple books, Chancel Strings and 2 volumes of another that I can't recall off the top of my head. We are trying to keep it liturgical, but may need to pull from some classical to fill the void. I was hoping that someone out there may know of some collections that are nice (not Suzuki rewrites.)

Thank you for those suggestions, I will look them up ASAP!

Chris

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Alan Jemison has some easy violin duo arrangements that are fun to play. Most of these are straightforward presentations of tunes predating the Rodeheaver (Cokesbury, et al) era.

It's a tough question, cause tastes vary so much. Gigwise, however, you definitely need lots of variety.

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If you have a keyboard player, then you can try all the church sonatas by Corelli and his contemporaries, and also the Mozart church sonatas. They're written for church, and people should be very happy to hear them there! :-)

Most of the Baroque trio sonatas would be perfect, too. I don't restrict myself to the two violins & b.c. repertoire but use anything for two C treble instruments. There are trio sonatas by Avison, Locatelli, Händel, Telemann ... and I've played them a lot in churches.

There is also the Suite for violin, viola and strings by Kurt Atterberg. The viola part is written in G clef and he even suggests himself that it can be played on a second violin. The orchestra reduction works fine on either the piano or the organ.

Actually I suggested the Rygner books because most of the Suzuki repertoire is good music that could be brought to life again by two professional violinists. I occasionally play some of those pieces in public with my friends just to remember (and maybe remind some listener) how beautiful they are.

But if you're looking for arrangements of hymns ... have you tried the collections that Melody4u found and used for a recital program? I haven't tried them myself but she wrote here that she was very happy with them.

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Thanks for the suggestions, eveyone. Troutabout - I'm a member of First Baptist Marietta, but transferred from First Baptisit Decatur when we moed out to the Canton/Woodstock area.

It looks like I'll have to get creative and do some transcriptions of the hymns with a little more fireworks to them. If you get a chance, take a look at the Chancel Strings book (mostly solo) to get an idea of what we like to do. There just isn't much out there like this, evidently.

Thanks again!

Chris

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Here's one of the books from the series that Melody4u recommended:

http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/pages.html?c...amp;r=wwws-err5

Also, the songs of Taizé can basically work like La Follia or any division on a ground -- there is a theme which has harmonies set, and then there are lots of different variations or solos on top. With the big book of instrumental parts from Taizé, you can put together really nice instrumental pieces with a lot of variation of character and dynamics and range. There are even quite a few duet variations. The violin is very rarely heard in Taizé, but you can use the oboe, flute and recorder parts, for example, and transpose the clarinet parts. There are songs that a lot of people know and songs that are probably not that well-known in the US, and there's more than a hundred to choose from ...

The same thing goes for quite a few songs by Margaret Rizza (Kevin Mayhew), but she writes parts for the violin, too! :-)

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Lorenz has a 2-volume set entitled "Violin Hymns & Obbligatos for the Church Year" by Douglas Smith. These don't go above third position, and can be used with a standard hymnal. One part is always the basic melody, and 8va is suggested as an embellishment. To go for the "Chancel Strings" effect, you can put in some snappy rhythms and fifth-position sixteenth-note scales. Very practical stuff.

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C.B., could you post a link to where I can get the Chancel Strings books? They sound interesting, and I tried a Google search but couldn't find them.

Marie, if you can get a link for the book that you recommended, too, I'd like to have a look at that!

Thanks!

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Most good-sized music publications dealers carry Lillenas and Lorenz. With the tight economy, perusal could be a problem in smaller stores. If you're near a city, call around; you could get lucky. Otherwise, you might consider gambling a bit with an online dealer. The nice guys at Shar have been known to scope out a book for a faithful customer with well-thought-out questions.

Whoops! I see you might be in the UK. I would be very surprised if any music dealer in the UK carries Lorenz or Lillenas. Maybe you could get books directly from these publishers. Mel Bay, a St. Louis MO USA publisher, has a store that carries lots of alternative style stuff, including publications other than their own. I'm sure they have a website. You might need to help them out a little with money exchange info. Maybe not. They seem to be a pretty savvy outfit.

Here's something about Rodeheaver, my candidate for most powerful US citizen of the twentieth century: God's Trombone

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C.B., could you post a link to where I can get the Chancel Strings books? They sound interesting, and I tried a Google search but couldn't find them.

Marie, if you can get a link for the book that you recommended, too, I'd like to have a look at that!

Thanks!

Unfortunately, I believe the Chancel strings book is out of print now. I remember my wife misplaced it last year and was freaking out when she couldn't replace it. Luckily, we found it. I tried a search on ebay, but couldn't find it. I would keep a lookout on ebay, or any used book/music store.

Here is one of the only descriptions left online:

http://www.pinelakemusic.com/scripts/oneti...;productid=5644

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Quick question... What are the copyright laws for out of print books? Is it legal to make copies to give to others once they're out of print? I know I can make copies for my own personal use, but what about for others?

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Copyright on out-of-print books apparently can remain in force. A publisher may grant limited permission to copy, after a written request is submitted, using their form. If your request is granted, you pay them for each copy, up to their stated limit. ($10 each for 25 copies of one skinny little book that I just happen to know of.)

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LeClair and DeBeriot both have nice duets. I don't think you should worry too much about the level of the duet the true level is all in how you play it and that is the only level that the parishoners are going to notice anyway.

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Quick question... What are the copyright laws for out of print books? Is it legal to make copies to give to others once they're out of print? I know I can make copies for my own personal use, but what about for others?

A copyright on a book written after 1978 (I think this would be; I met Douglas Smith around 76 or so and this wasn't around) lasts the author's lifetime plus 70 years.

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I took a peek at Lillenas' website. Here's a quick pathway to answers about their copyright policy: Lillenas

I better return "Chancel Strings" to my downstairs file of infrequently and intensely useful things. It sat on my desk for several days before my curiosity about the picture on the front stirred back to life. It's probably just a slightly funky blend of a real violinist posing, a camera distorting, and a skilled artist drawing the shape of a violin for pretty much the first time.

Oh dear! I see that Lillenas is still selling "Christmas is a Birthday". Some things just go on and on, like making money.

Douglas Smith's books are still readily available. There's even an newer one: Volume III

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Two very romantic pieces that I think would work well in a Sunday service (I'd pick them for church recitals anyway):

First movement of the Moszkowski Suite for two violins and piano

Prelude from the Schostakovich Three pieces for two violins and piano

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Even though most of the pieces in this anthology are just candy, you might find something useful here:

http://www.bosworth.de/print/result_1.php?...;result_suche3=

1) Kalliwoda wrote at least two volumes of tuneful, virtuosic violin duets; more substantial musically than the de Beriot. Kalliwoda was a big deal a hundred - plus years ago, being a fine player/composer. Long out of print no doubt, an inter-library loan is a possibility.

2) Joseph Haydn violin duets ( not the Michael Haydn violin & viola duets).

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I'm always looking for interesting arrangements to play in church. As many have noted, it's not easy to find good arrangements.

As I searched (unsuccessfully) for a used copy of Chancel Strings, I found this book by the same composer at sheetmusicplus.com

Hymn Tunes for Unaccompanied Violin, by Marilyn Carlson

A search at the site should find the book for those that are interested. I ordered it and the Smith books to have a look.

Thanks to all for the various suggestions on this thread.

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