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Chris Knowlton

Tool question

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You might also search here, I remember not too long ago (in the past year, I think), someone posted a picture of a nifty one made from plywood, that looked not difficult to make, and quite good. I'm going to try to find it, I'll want to try making one...

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The main reason for the frame is not for fitting the bass bar, It's to keep the top plate flat while it's off the instrument. I find that working through the hole, while the plate is clamped to the frame, to be kind of a pain. I usually do the work, and then clamp it to the frame in between work sessions. I had a local welder make up an aluminum frame for me. I bought an appropriate sized piece of aluminum from a local supplier, traced the shape that I wanted, had had the welder cut it out for me. A little file work on the edges, and a little wire brushing, and I was good to go.

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Here you go. This works really well. I made 2, one for violin one for viola. Ply is 15mm thick, can't see any benefit to using aluminium for new making.

Not one to be a shy bairn...John, could you reduce the size of those photos? I don't know why, but when I attempt to open larger photos in Maestronet (even if I download and save them), I only get about a third to half of the photo. Those look like interesting photos of a useful tool, but I can't get a look at them.

Chet Bishop

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Not one to be a shy bairn...John, could you reduce the size of those photos? I don't know why, but when I attempt to open larger photos in Maestronet (even if I download and save them), I only get about a third to half of the photo. Those look like interesting photos of a useful tool, but I can't get a look at them.

Chet Bishop

At the risk of mass derision (because I know this question must have been asked and answered previously) can you explain the simplest way to do this?

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At the risk of mass derision (because I know this question must have been asked and answered previously) can you explain the simplest way to do this?

I use Adobe Photoshop for this. First you upload your photo into Photoshop and then go into the save mode--you will find a dialog in which you can choose the pixel density--find one that gives total file size of around 30 kbytes--there is a screen that lets you see what the photo at each pixel density looks like.

Mike D

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At the risk of mass derision (because I know this question must have been asked and answered previously) can you explain the simplest way to do this?

Find "save as" in your tool bars, as if to change the names of the file. There will be a "more options" button. Click that, and you'll find an image quality bar. bringing that bar down lowers the file size.

also, for those who have little experience working aluminum, it's quite soft and workable. It would be no problem cutting it with a finer toothed blade on a fret saw. And sanding it/filing it is a breeze, also.

I find it harder to spell, than work with :)

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At the risk of mass derision (because I know this question must have been asked and answered previously) can you explain the simplest way to do this?

John

A neat image manipulation program that is free and has been around for a long time is irfanview. I wouldn't be without it on my PC. The link is http://www.irfanview.com/.

I don't have it loaded on the PC I am on now so I can't give you specific directions. Just install the program, open the picture and then choose image on the toolbar and reduce the file size to say 800 x 600. Then choose file/save and save under a new name if you want to keep the original file.

Hope this helps.

Joe

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The main reason for the frame is not for fitting the bass bar, It's to keep the top plate flat while it's off the instrument. I find that working through the hole, while the plate is clamped to the frame, to be kind of a pain.

The frame is to keep the plate stable during fitting and gluing of the bass bar. The fitting is more effective if you’re not chasing a moving target.

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Is this better?

Yup, thanks.

And regardless of what Piglet may or may not be doing, I'd like to know where to get the steel portions of the clamps you made.

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Thanks everyone. I wasn't going to use my carving cradle to fit the bassbar because I can't fit my homemade bassbar clamps over the wall of the cradle. After seeing JohnCee's set up I think I'll make some clamps like his and be on my way.

post-24557-1224552944_thumb.jpg

Chris

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I don't know but I would like to know if piglet is doing the nasty on that cup of yours on the right :)

Well spotted , Dean. It's been a long hard road but after years of professional help, the poor chap is finally getting his dirty little habits under control....

post-23651-1224574090_thumb.jpg

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Chet, I think that if I lived in the US I would just buy suitable clamps (I remember from an old MD post that McMasters(?) sell them). The only reason I made them is that light, deep throat clamps appear to be unavailable in the UK at a reasonable cost.

As I mentioned in the original thread, this frame is a quick and dirty implementation of one described by either Curtin or Alf (can't remember) in a Strad Trade Secrets article. I like the moveable "arms" that allow for very repeatable placement of the bar during fitting/gluing.

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