priya

violin linings

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impressive website , have people had good dealings with them

I am thinking about placing an order

The Japanese E string adjuster looks interesting--but I assume that the price quoted is an error. Surely it can't be 300 euros! I was about to order some until I saw the price.

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impressive website , have people had good dealings with them

I am thinking about placing an order

Hello Adam,

I havent purchased wood from them. I got my willow lining and block wood from Rivolta in Italy (plus wallnut for moulds). I can't find it on their website, but if you Download their tonewood pricelist, it is listed at the bottom of page four.

6 strips of 800x30x2.5mm for lining cost Euro 10 and will last a long time. Willow for blocks is Euro 7 for a piece of 450x110x45mm

Unfortunately postage to Australia could be more than the actual wood. I did purchase some of the spruce and maple at the same time and can recommend them.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Cheers, Peter

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Hello Adam,

I havent purchased wood from them. I got my willow lining and block wood from Rivolta in Italy (plus wallnut for moulds). I can't find it on their website, but if you Download their tonewood pricelist, it is listed at the bottom of page four.

6 strips of 800x30x2.5mm for lining cost Euro 10 and will last a long time. Willow for blocks is Euro 7 for a piece of 450x110x45mm

Unfortunately postage to Australia could be more than the actual wood. I did purchase some of the spruce and maple at the same time and can recommend them.

I hope this is of some help to you.

Cheers, Peter

Thanks Peter , website www.riwoods.com

cheers Adam

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Hi Ben,

The cricket bat is not compressed but is made from the lower part of the blue willow. All English cricket bats are made from trees that are grown from cuttings of one particular tree since the 18th century!

The most abundant willow in the Uk is the crack willow. The wood is very light. The bottom of the trunk is strong and resilient, ideal for linings or blocks. Higher up the trunk is good for blocks.

I think I have posted this link before. I don't think you would want to put this wood inside your violin.

Jeff

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what about getting the blank before it is turned into a bat

I believe that some of these places have offcuts that can be had quite cheaply. These should be more than adequate for blocks and linings. You'll probably find the postage costs more than the wood itself.

You could of course try some Australian Willow:-

http://www.net-a-porter.com/Shop/Designers...&bbcid=2625

Jeff

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I believe that some of these places have offcuts that can be had quite cheaply. These should be more than adequate for blocks and linings. You'll probably find the postage costs more than the wood itself.

You could of course try some Australian Willow:-

http://www.net-a-porter.com/Shop/Designers...&bbcid=2625

Jeff

I have bought a blank form a bat maker in Melbourne who imports english willow

I'm just not quite sure if I should be using the Italian red willow

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Looked at my receipts, I paid 2 Euro for enough willow linings for a Cello and 3 violins.

I made a very large order last time, and my supplier also gave me a few free violin backs, with stunning flame.

They are bloody good, lovely to talk to on the phone, try them !!

Andreas Gleissner Tonewood. :)

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Looked at my receipts, I paid 2 Euro for enough willow linings for a Cello and 3 violins.

I made a very large order last time, and my supplier also gave me a few free violin backs, with stunning flame.

They are bloody good, lovely to talk to on the phone, try them !!

Andreas Gleissner Tonewood. :)

[/quote

Thanks for that Ben

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Same as Salve I use Linden for linings and blocks. I like it as it's light and nice to work. Got a 100 centimeters by 40 by 5 board for 10 € in a local sawmill.

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The funny thing is that once you've found a good wood supplier, you never really have to worry much about wood......so, my advice is to find a good supplier, and stick with them.

The longer you stick with them and the more you buy, the nicer they'll be to you.

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I paid 2 Euro for enough willow linings for a Cello and 3 violins.

But the minimum order value at Andreas Gleissner Tonewood is EUR 200.-

Cheers, Peter

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I have bought a blank form a bat maker in Melbourne who imports english willow

I'm just not quite sure if I should be using the Italian red willow

I have been through this obsessional phase with block/lining material myself. Wolfjk kindly provided me with a couple of logs of English willow from a storm felled tree in a local country lane that will provide enough blocks and linings to keep me going for several years.

This willow is very straight grained and very nice to work with. Other pieces of willow I have tried can be very "gnarly" and very difficult to carve.

Now I realise it's a bit bonkers to get fixated with block/lining material. If you can find willow locally/conveniently, then use that. Otherwise, just use spruce, like del Gesu did!

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I have been through this obsessional phase with block/lining material myself. Wolfjk kindly provided me with a couple of logs of English willow from a storm felled tree in a local country lane that will provide enough blocks and linings to keep me going for several years.

This willow is very straight grained and very nice to work with. Other pieces of willow I have tried can be very "gnarly" and very difficult to carve.

Now I realise it's a bit bonkers to get fixated with block/lining material. If you can find willow locally/conveniently, then use that. Otherwise, just use spruce, like del Gesu did!

Yes ..........it is splitting hairs a bit

I am still interested in the difference between red & english willow , does anyone know ?

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Yes ..........it is splitting hairs a bit

I am still interested in the difference between red & english willow , does anyone know ?

I'm not a tree expert, but the English willow that I got from Wolfjk seems more or less indistinguishable from red willow. The red willow was given to me by Neil Ertz, who I think got it from Bois de Lutherie on one of their UK visits.

Wolfjk might wish to comment. He knows his trees.

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I'm not a tree expert, but the English willow that I got from Wolfjk seems more or less indistinguishable from red willow. The red willow was given to me by Neil Ertz, who I think got it from Bois de Lutherie on one of their UK visits.

Wolfjk might wish to comment. He knows his trees.

I have not heard of "red" willow, perhaps the name comes from the pinkish colour of the wood? The two main species, Salix alba, and salix fragilis cross polinate and produce many sub species. The sallow or goat willow have a heavier and harder timber which would be no good for lining. There is also the weeping willow.

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impressive website , have people had good dealings with them

I am thinking about placing an order

Their website looks good until you try to navigate it - you cannot relocate the last image visited - and it always crashes after a little while browsing.

I have emailed them and have had prompt replies. Maybe easier to deal with them by email - they only accept paypal on the website. He said it was no problem to contact them direct with an order. He sent me a Harald Lorenz pricelist - and is the only place I have found selling some Lorenz stuff.

Geoff.

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If you wish took at alternative lining woods surely maple is an obvious option. Not too different from beech, use offcuts from ribs before they’re thinned down.  Could they not also be roughly shaped before glueing to ribs?

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Within reason, I think it's best to use as light as wood as possible for the blocks and linings. Every gram counts, right? I followed Manfio and Marty's leads and am using Paulownia (averages 30% lighter than Willow) for the corner blocks and linings, Willow for the end blocks due to greater crushing strength. 

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Other than in some electric guitars, I'm not aware of paulownia being favored for acoustic properties?    Light is not the only concern in acoustic wood choice, so is the return of energy -- elasticity.    Is it a talkative wood when you run your finger nails on it??

Anyway, linings don't seem to be a super sensitive choice.  Obviously both willow and spruce have been used in very successful instruments.  For myself, I make my blocks and linings of red willow -- just to follow the main Cremona tradition.   But I don't think of it's necessarily very important. 

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I was of the impression it was chosen for electric guitars also because it is light, but I could be wrong. It's cool stuff - quite resilient for such a light wood. The slips I prepare for linings sort of 'jingle' when I drop them onto the bench, for what it's worth. I agree that the blocks and linings are probably not a big area of concert acoustically as long as they aren't something very heavy that could dampen excessively. 

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