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another ebay violin


priya

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Priya,

This looks like a very nice violin....even though the back has a crack. I like the wear and general appearance. Do you have any ideas of its origin?

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For what it's worth, I agree it looks nice. I think I remember this one, I immediately recognized the photography anyway. After buying from Ebay for 5 years I can pretty much tell sellers by their lighting now!

My question for the experts is, what's up with the varnish? It looks like it may have been rubbed down a lot over the years and then maybe somebody tried to add back some pigment? Then again with that department store lighting, it's hard to tell. Anyway my first thought was that I've seen many older Germanic ones "antiqued" like this, for instance I bought a similar one with a baroque neck (from Germany no less, for like $1600... Priya, you think YOU've got a problem with learning your lesson??) that of course I hoped was Italian but turned out to be an 1800 Kligenthal fiddle. The similarities I notice are the varnish, especially the color and the antiqueing pattern, the wood and edgework. But yours is a whole lot prettier! And I assume that the antiquing is more honestly acquired on yours :)

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Ah, thanks, Omo. I wondered whether those were what you were seeing too.

I took them to be artifacts of our inbuilt pattern-matching needs, sort of like those "Jesus's portrait appears on a piece of burnt toast" phenomena that show up in supermarket tabloids. I suppose I dismiss them because I can't imagine several people (the "handwriting" is different in each case) actually deciding to randomly doodle on the back of a fiddle as though on a piece of scrap paper. Not only randomly, but lightly, a sort of half-hearted, purposeless vandalism without communication.

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For what it's worth, I agree it looks nice. I think I remember this one, I immediately recognized the photography anyway. After buying from Ebay for 5 years I can pretty much tell sellers by their lighting now!

My question for the experts is, what's up with the varnish? It looks like it may have been rubbed down a lot over the years and then maybe somebody tried to add back some pigment? Then again with that department store lighting, it's hard to tell. Anyway my first thought was that I've seen many older Germanic ones "antiqued" like this, for instance I bought a similar one with a baroque neck (from Germany no less, for like $1600... Priya, you think YOU've got a problem with learning your lesson??) that of course I hoped was Italian but turned out to be an 1800 Kligenthal fiddle. The similarities I notice are the varnish, especially the color and the antiqueing pattern, the wood and edgework. But yours is a whole lot prettier! And I assume that the antiquing is more honestly acquired on yours :)

Department store lighting? I don't think I was aiming for that? Which store?

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I wondered whether those were what you were seeing too.

I took them to be artifacts of our inbuilt pattern-matching needs ....because I can't imagine several people actually deciding to randomly doodle on the back of a fiddle as though on a piece of scrap paper.

May be nothing - but could have been a bored kid in orchestra doing his homework and using his fiddle as backing for his maths and grammar lessons? Ha!

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For what it's worth, I agree it looks nice. I think I remember this one, I immediately recognized the photography anyway. After buying from Ebay for 5 years I can pretty much tell sellers by their lighting now!

My question for the experts is, what's up with the varnish? It looks like it may have been rubbed down a lot over the years and then maybe somebody tried to add back some pigment? Then again with that department store lighting, it's hard to tell. Anyway my first thought was that I've seen many older Germanic ones "antiqued" like this, for instance I bought a similar one with a baroque neck (from Germany no less, for like $1600... Priya, you think YOU've got a problem with learning your lesson??) that of course I hoped was Italian but turned out to be an 1800 Kligenthal fiddle. The similarities I notice are the varnish, especially the color and the antiqueing pattern, the wood and edgework. But yours is a whole lot prettier! And I assume that the antiquing is more honestly acquired on yours :)

Are you saying it's probably a violin made out to look better than it actually is due to the lighting used? Or are you saying that when such lighting is used, the seller is usually trying to make the violin look better?

Ah, thanks, Omo. I wondered whether those were what you were seeing too.

I took them to be artifacts of our inbuilt pattern-matching needs, sort of like those "Jesus's portrait appears on a piece of burnt toast" phenomena that show up in supermarket tabloids. I suppose I dismiss them because I can't imagine several people (the "handwriting" is different in each case) actually deciding to randomly doodle on the back of a fiddle as though on a piece of scrap paper. Not only randomly, but lightly, a sort of half-hearted, purposeless vandalism without communication.

Pure class, bean fidhleir.

Oh, you know, Bloomingdale's or something :)

I thought you had posted the photos from the listing, I guess I didn't read carefully enough!

I believe priya took you seriously when you commented on the lighting being "department store" like. From my understanding, the photos are from the eBay listing.

Basically, priya, many sellers use lighting to make a fiddle look better, and perhaps to target a few problem areas on an instrument as well. It's like taking a decent ten megapixel camera and using flash for the picture.

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"If I'm not mistaken, if the violin is a Caussin (IF) as Mr. Dorsey suggested, it would have been antiqued to begin with."

I think you are correct. The antiquing is what suggested Caussin to me. But maybe I am mistaken and what I see is real wear, not antiquing.

"Jeez, if that's artificial wear, it must have taken nigh onto as long as creating real wear."

It could be a combination of antiquing plus a century of real wear.

So it's a win-win situation then. It could be a Caussin, or just an older fiddle. :)

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So, Priya, how does your new fiddle-with-post-crack sound? Is it at least a good player, if not a good investment?

Hi Bean!

The back crack had a patch that wasn't doing the job, the patch had cracked and the sound post crack showed movement upon palpation.

I'll have it back in a week with a new bridge and patch. The violin has good bones and I remain hopeful.

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