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reverberation


marmotte
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Hello,

I'm new to this forum and I have a little problem with this reverberation that has appeared since I changed the tailpiece on my violin. It isn't of course the normal reverberation of the note played, but sort of several (wrong) overtones warped together... The reverberation only occurs when I play an open string. When I make only one bow stroke, it doesn't occur but it gets stronger with more bow strokes.

The tailpiece I installed (it was an emergency replacement) is a quite inexpensive Acusticus one with integrated finetuners and a wire tailgut, the only thing I could get quickly around the corner here. It doesn't seem to fit the violin really well, I think it's to close to the top and afterlenght seems to long to me, but then, I'm not really very experienced in these matters. I have already ordered a Wittner Ultra one to replace it with eventually, but until then, what can I do to get rid of these reverberations?

(I will take the instrument to a shop later this summer to have everythin controlled, but I need it right now..)

Thanks, M.

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Probably just the adjusters buzzing.

So, tighten them up until nothing it free to buzz, then tune the instrument with the pegs.

Then, use the adjusters again.

Thanks for your reply, but the finetuners are integrated into the tailpiece, the only screw there is to tighten is the tuning screw itself.

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I wouldn't relate tuner (or whatever) buzzing to reverbs. I'm pretty sure the intergrated tuner tailpiece is made out of metal.

But I still don't see why metal tailpiece will cause extra reverbs, though. However the hint is it only occur when playing open strings.

Hmm...

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Ok, so are the tuners screwed down enough so they don't buzz ?

Is the end of the tail piece free from the saddle and chin rest ?

Is the small plastic E-string guide on the bridge or buzzing loose behind it ?

Is the chin rest buzzing ?

What are you smoking ?

Cheers.

Yes.

Yes.

Yes.

Yes.

I dont.

Thanks.

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Ok, so is a reverb the same as a buzz ?

Not as far as I'm concerned. It's a reverb, as I said above, made of several overtones, partly false ones, together

Also, a plastic tailpiece is not really gonna be of much interest to a buyer.

I only bought it as an emergency replacement, I needed one with finetuners, as I play steel cords and am not used to tuning with the pegs. Once I have got the better one, this one will be chucked, I'm not planning to auction it on ebay.

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My interpretation is that there's some strange leftover tones (unwanted overtones ringing loudly). So that alone doesn't sounds like he's talking bout buzzing.

EDIT: oops, late reply...

marmotte guess you have to live with your current situation until you get a replacement. Maybe you want to borrow one from other people if the sound is really bad?

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New metal and plastic adjustable tailpieces have tuning screws that are often very stiff when new. While you may think they are tight - they might not be touching the adjuster lever inside - resulting sometimes in a buzz, sometimes a sympathetic harmonic overtone. Also look to see if the tailpiece wire is touching the belly underneath the tailpiece.

Pluck the G. The D afterlength should be the same note but higher. Same with the D and A afterlength. If these are in the ballpark then you may have a loose seam or length of lining.

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Hello,

I'm new to this forum and I have a little problem with this reverberation that has appeared since I changed the tailpiece on my violin. It isn't of course the normal reverberation of the note played, but sort of several (wrong) overtones warped together... The reverberation only occurs when I play an open string. When I make only one bow stroke, it doesn't occur but it gets stronger with more bow strokes.

The tailpiece I installed (it was an emergency replacement) is a quite inexpensive Acusticus one with integrated finetuners and a wire tailgut, the only thing I could get quickly around the corner here. It doesn't seem to fit the violin really well, I think it's to close to the top and afterlenght seems to long to me, but then, I'm not really very experienced in these matters. I have already ordered a Wittner Ultra one to replace it with eventually, but until then, what can I do to get rid of these reverberations?

(I will take the instrument to a shop later this summer to have everythin controlled, but I need it right now..)

Thanks, M.

+++++++++++++

Have you checked the nut? Sometime the nut cut by the strings to become too low. It makes

noises as string touches the fingerboard.

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+++++++++++++

Have you checked the nut? Sometime the nut cut by the strings to become too low. It makes

noises as string touches the fingerboard.

I wouldn't suspect the nut, If I read this right there wasn't a problem until the tailpiece was changed. My opinion is that the sound is a sympathetic rattle on the tailpiece. Somthing must be loose. While you'r playing the open string, reach over and touch different parts of the tailpiece and see if the sound disappears

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Improper afterlength can cause the exact problem you're experiencing, marmotte. Changing out the tailpiece may have left the strings too long, especially if you went from a tailpiece with no fine tuners to an all in one with fine tuners. I've noticed that they usually make the all in one units very small so they can be used on full sized as well as fractional sized violins without the need for stocking different units for each. I have a Thomastik metal tailpiece that came on my beginner's fiddle that's smaller than a 2/4 size tailpiece.

You can still use this tailpiece if your tail gut is adjustable and can be made long enough to get your afterlength down to a normal setting. I use a 56-60mm afterlength. Most nylon tailguts won't allow more than a few mm's of adjustment, and you don't want to risk unscrewing the nuts too much. There should always be full thread of the nylon cord remaining in the nuts or they could pull off the ends of the tailgut and allow the tailpiece to break loose. Very exciting!!!

You could use an old mandolin trick to see if adjusting the afterlength will have any effect. Take some rawhide cord or some leather strips and interweave it through the strings in the afterlength area. Anything that would mute the sound would work. If this knocks down the reverberation that you're hearing then the afterlength is the cause. A piece of duct tape or masking tape would probably work too. Don't get it too close to the bridge or it will act as a mute. Try loosely taping over your tailpiece too, just in case it's resonating with your strings. Plastic isn't the best non-resonant material to use for tailpieces so it might be adding to your problem.

You want some resonance in the afterlength. If it's set too short the sound will be deadened or pinched sounding. Properly set you should hear a nice singing resonance without the flooded bathroom reverb effect.

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Hello,

I'm new to this forum and I have a little problem with this reverberation that has appeared since I changed the tailpiece on my violin. It isn't of course the normal reverberation of the note played, but sort of several (wrong) overtones warped together... The reverberation only occurs when I play an open string. When I make only one bow stroke, it doesn't occur but it gets stronger with more bow strokes.

The tailpiece I installed (it was an emergency replacement) is a quite inexpensive Acusticus one with integrated finetuners and a wire tailgut, the only thing I could get quickly around the corner here. It doesn't seem to fit the violin really well, I think it's to close to the top and afterlenght seems to long to me, but then, I'm not really very experienced in these matters. I have already ordered a Wittner Ultra one to replace it with eventually, but until then, what can I do to get rid of these reverberations?

(I will take the instrument to a shop later this summer to have everythin controlled, but I need it right now..)

Thanks, M.

++++++++++++++

Here what I normally would do (a thorough job)

(1) tighten everything

(2) check the clearances of every place to see if sufficient.

(3) Peg box

(4) Tailpiece

In your case put the old tailpiece back to see what happen? Cheap tailpiece should work

just fine, only look cheap.

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Seeing as this tailpiece is getting replaced soon, and you're just looking for a way to stop it from annoying you in the mean time. fold some kleenex into a small rectangle, and wedge it between the tailpiece shaft and the body of the instrument. See if that stops any unwanted reverb.

Speaking of smoking, Pincas Zuckerman once wedged a cigarette in this area to control wolf notes, for one of his recordings. So sometimes even sarcasm hides wisdom :)

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Sounds like the new tailpiece is a bit too active. To tone it down, you could place a bit of leather, cork or cardboard between the tail wire and the saddle. Or you can add a bit of weight to the tailpiece, something like playdough. Have you tried the advice above, of weaving some leather through the strings behind the bridge? That seemed like good advice to me.

Oded

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Brilliant, thanks guys, there is so much advice here as should really solve my problem. I'll try everything you said, and let you know what happened.

I solved the "problem", but without having an explanation for it....

It's not the violin, that's making the reverberations, it's my hearing aids :) , as I discovered when playing without them :) Luckily it only appears after playing open strings and playing them for a while and playing them loudly (as you would while tuning the violin, but I can live with that...)

However, why these reverberations appear since I changed the tailpiece is a mystery for me! Anyone else here with that problem? I will let you know what happens when I have changed the tailpiece again...

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I solved the "problem", but without having an explanation for it....

It's not the violin, that's making the reverberations, it's my hearing aids :) , as I discovered when playing without them :) Luckily it only appears after playing open strings and playing them for a while and playing them loudly (as you would while tuning the violin, but I can live with that...)

However, why these reverberations appear since I changed the tailpiece is a mystery for me! Anyone else here with that problem? I will let you know what happens when I have changed the tailpiece again...

There must be some overtones produced that your hearing aid(s) are more resposive to than the fundamentals of the note.

Perhaps they have some of the "Aphex Exciter" deign buillt into them where they introduce a small amount of distortion into the high frequency content of the audio to make the higher frequencies appear brighter.

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