Speaking of Bending Irons...


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quote:


Originally posted by:
C.B.Fiddler
Based on my

email discussions with Dov and with absolutely no disrespect

intended, Dov seems to be uninterested to do such. He seems to be

more of a "it works for me and that's enough" kind of user - as

opposed to many of us that want to know why and how things works

(or doesn't work) so well.

Perhaps he is also a person who likes to sell stuff, and then a

photo might help do that?

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I am usually pretty inquisitive about details and have driven more than a few vendors batty with questions, but for some things, all the detail in the world will not tell you how well the thing works. It could be a Rolls Royce on paper and burst into flames the first day. If I needed an iron and he had a respectable return policy, I'd buy it and find out for myself.

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Why slap him around with a red herring??

It's a great iron so long as it behaves as designed. It's clearly far better than its nearest competition price-wise. He is going to have no trouble selling them even if he restricts himself to the same level of detail in his advertising as every other seller of violin making tools.

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I made a bending iron and had it cast (solid) in some type of Aluminium. It takes 30 minutes to reach the temperature that I need and then I just pull the plug. I never did fit a thermostat to it although that was my original intention. With my iron it just isn't needed.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
NewNewbie

quote:


Originally posted by:
C.B.Fiddler
Based on my

email discussions with Dov and with absolutely no disrespect

intended, Dov seems to be uninterested to do such. He seems to be

more of a "it works for me and that's enough" kind of user - as

opposed to many of us that want to know why and how things works

(or doesn't work) so well.

Perhaps he is also a person who likes to sell stuff, and then a

photo might help do that?

I'm still intent on making mine work before dropping another $100+. Maybe if he received multiple inquiries with same questions he might be motivated to find out more info?

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Now these Chinese PID (proportional, integral, deriviative)

controllers are pretty ubiquitous. Originally these units were

American and Japanese made. They ran $400 or more depending on

options. I bid on several used ones on eBay a few years back but

they went for more than I could afford. Now the new ones are

between $30-40 and they work very well.

I used one of the cheap ones to build an "oultet" controller.

Basically, anything you can plug in to an outlet can be temperature

controlled since it turns the power supply to the outlet on and off

based on the measured temp from the thermocouple.  I tested it

with a hot water glue pot. First you insert the thermocouple in the

water pot, plug in the pot and set the temp. The unit is full on

for a few minutes, the temperature increases and then about 10

degrees below the temp setting it clicks off and magically drifts

up the the setting. Then it flips on and off to hold your temp

setting precisely. You've really got to see it to believe it. On is

full on, off is off. Temp is controlled via the ratio of time on

and off so you don't give up any heating speed because when it's

below temp it's full on.

If you switch devices, you have to go through several "training"

cycles to avoid overshooting since the delta T is different.

 The unit I put together was for  knifemaking buddy. He

uses it to control a blade tempering kiln and a hotplate used

to heat a high temp salt bluing solution. You could easily set one

up to control a bending iron, glue pot, even a UV box (fan on and

off). Just cycle it a couple of times to "retrain" when you change

devices. Also make sure that your power requirements are within the

capacity of the internal relay or wire up an external SSR (that's

what I did).

It made a pretty high tech glue pot. I guess I should have taken a

picture for the glue pot threads...

Hal

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