Tenacity/Frugality/IQ test


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I plan to use a piece of ceramic tile between the iron and the base, plus have the iron up off the base by about 1/4" (i.e. a 1/4" of open space under the iron). I figure that should remove any worries about heat damage to the base, which I'm planning to make out of wood. I will definitely have to complete this soon, as the work on the belly is proceeding at break-neck pace compared to the back. I may be in position to do purfling by this weekend...

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I'm using some backing board that is used with the installation of ceramic tile. It's about 3/8" thick, has some type of fibers in it, waterproof, and cuts similar to wallboard or gypsum board. Probably has gypsum or CaSO4 in it but it is stronger and does not dust or come apart like wall board. I'm using two boards thick. Also I put some steel washers around the mounting screws as spacers between the wood case and this tile backing board to further insulate the wood from the bending iron base.

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I'm not sure how much of an issue it is, but if you want to be extra careful you could have your mounting screws (machine screws I assume) go through oversized holes in the wood so they don't touch. Get some PTFE washers from Mcmaster-carr and use those to insulate the iron on one side, and the nuts on the other side, so there's no metal-to-wood contact. Plot it all out ahead of time so you choose the exact right size of washers. Or perhaps you can find ceramic fiber products to use in a similar way.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Andres Sender

Remember that mounting screws will also transmit heat. Apparently this is not an issue with the Ibex?

They just go through holes in the wood and are anchored by a nut and washer each. It doesn't seem to be an issue.

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Getting close now. Almost done the grunt work (and, in this case, that's a very accurate name!). Hope to be ready to take it for a spin this weekend or early next week. I think its first task (test task) will be to bend some linings. I've arranged the waste aluminum in the foreground - I do think this'll keep me in bar stock for a while...

iron_5.jpg

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Earlier in this thread there was a safety discussion on the aluminum dust. Another safety item would be the final shaping of the bending iron. Presumably everyone is aware that using a grinding wheel/grinder on aluminum is not recommended. Filing (as Tim is doing) and using a belt sander (as Chet et al have suggested) is the safe way. The stone wheel in a grinder can load up with aluminum and throw the balance of the wheel off. This imbalance can lead to disaster. I haven't personally tested this but would suggest it isn't one that you should try at home.

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Tim, I'm no metalsmith, but I think for working on soft metals, such as brass and aluminum, some people load the file with chalk to prevent the metal from getting imbedded. not especially related to this discussion. but I sawed some aluminum alloy sheet recently with a sabre saw, and the aluminum actually seemed to weld itself into the gullets of the blade! I couldn't remove it. I had to either get a new blade or use a new portion of the old blade.

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Thanks, guys, that chalk idea sounds like something I'll have to try next time. I have to admit, when I first read "file card", I thought of the 3X5 kind, and went, "...huh???", but then I remembered what "carding wool" meant, and the light went on. I guess for now I'll continue to use a broken hacksaw blade, it works okay, and next time I'll definitely try the chalk trick...

C.B. the block was originally 3"x3", and 4" high.

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Tim--do your files a favor and don't use the hacksaw blade. Endgrain of a piece of wood works usually and is kinder to the file. (spruce works well as I recall).

Chalk's a good idea but as I recall with the coarse file I used for this I didn't have a problem with loading. Maybe it was the particular alloy (no idea what it was).

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