Tenacity/Frugality/IQ test


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I usually handle this type of situation by calculating the number of non-life-sustaining fast-food meals/sodas/bagels etc that would be required to pay for XX (eg insert here: 'bending iron').

Then, I buy XX...and the fast-food meals/sodas/bagels etc.

Amazing what carefully honed psychology can do.

ps - My better-half often points out a flaw in my reasoning, but I don't seem to get it.

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Tim,

I just want to say that I am really enjoying this thread, and I hope to see your finished product. Please continue and show us the result.

I used to want to build a stone house, by hand. (Well using levers or minimal machinery.) What a silly thing to want to do. And why did I want to do that? ..... Well, just because. ... At 5 years old, I remember building with those little red toy bricks.

What kids do at young ages is important. What were you doing at 5 years old?

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Tim McTigue

Truly, I don't mind taking a bit of ribbing. I'm well aware most people wouldn't do something like this, at least not this way, but I did want to show that pretty much anything is possible, even with few resources, if one has the will.

Tim, I didn't mean to ridicule what you're doing. I've done any number of metal working projects with saws, files, even knives, and like to think about different ways of doing things. Shaping things with abrasives (asphalt in my example) using an abrasive resistant surround is actually used for some things. The writing on tombstones is mostly done now by applying a rubber mask with cutouts for the text, and then sandblasting.

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I used a milling machine to shape the Al form. Draw the outline on the ends and then mill (30 min. job). After using the bending iron for a while, I found that the wood had more spring-back than I expected. So I reduced the radius of curvature. If you have access to the right tools, making things like that is not a big deal.

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If anyone has some green-sand casting experience, that would be the most efficient way to get what you wanted. Scrap aluminum is still very available, and melts at relatively low temps, making it possible to do aluminum founding using a charcoal fire. But I guess that's a subject for another thread....

:-)

Chet

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Andres Sender

Making your own iron is not just about the satisfaction of doing it yourself, it also gives the opportunity to have a shape which actually works for violin making, unlike the Ibex iron.

I was about to buy an Ibex Iron. Is it the consensus that these Irons are totally unsuitable for violins then? Or just 'could be better'.

Jim

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I have an Ibex - I think the consensus is that it's suitable, but not ideal. The corners are simply not tight enough for the upper turn in the C-Bout, but a little persuasion makes it possible.

I would love to make my own, but I spent so much time in the prebuild phase of violin making, I was happy to go ahead and shell out a few bucks for the Ibex. If nothing else, I have the foundation to recast or shape a new aluminum block later on and not have to worry about the electronics.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
COB3

If anyone has some green-sand casting experience, that would be the most efficient way to get what you wanted. Scrap aluminum is still very available, and melts at relatively low temps, making it possible to do aluminum founding using a charcoal fire...

Yes, that would probably do the job in an afternoon, if you knew what you were doing and had the equipment. I've read about making a forge out of an old brake drum, and even thought about trying it a while ago, but it seemed the kind of thing that wouldn't lead to something I'd want to do a lot of.

At any rate, here's a pic of my progress - this represents one hour's work from the previous pic. The switch arrived yesterday, so I decided I'd better get busy and get this aluminum ready, I presume the other parts will arrive sometime next week. Andres, you were right about the blade - a coarser blade makes all the difference. I might be able to get the block shaped by the end of the weekend, and be ready to put the thing together next week.

In other news, I'm just about done graduating the back, and I'm expecting to begin carving the belly this weekend as well. Last weekend I took some time out on Saturday to brew a batch of beer - Irish Red, if it turns out...

iron_2.jpg

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As far as the shape, what you see is not what I'm necessarily doing. The ellipse isn't nearly as wide as it looks, I have yet to cut the other side. I drew the pattern on the top twice, because I had a change of heart as to where to put it. I put the scraps on top to obscure the actual shape, as I've been asked not to share it.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Tim McTigue

As far as the shape, what you see is not what I'm necessarily doing. The ellipse isn't nearly as wide as it looks, I have yet to cut the other side. I drew the pattern on the top twice, because I had a change of heart as to where to put it. I put the scraps on top to obscure the actual shape, as I've been asked not to share it.

That's OK, Tim. I think most of us can probably work out for ourselves what shape a bending iron needs to be..............

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quote:


Originally posted by:
C.B.Fiddler

I have an Ibex - I think the consensus is that it's suitable, but not ideal. The corners are simply not tight enough for the upper turn in the C-Bout, but a little persuasion makes it possible.

I would love to make my own, but I spent so much time in the prebuild phase of violin making, I was happy to go ahead and shell out a few bucks for the Ibex. If nothing else, I have the foundation to recast or shape a new aluminum block later on and not have to worry about the electronics.

Thanks C.B.Fiddler. I see your logic.

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It is common now to see asymmetrical bending irons, but I don't think it is necessary. Many old irons are quite symmetrical and work well.

The key thing is to have a curvature that is sufficiently 'tight' to handle even the most challenging C bout bends.

It is very easy to open out an over-bent rib, but it is quite a challenge to create an aggressive bend in a figured rib without proper support.

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>>I cannot argue with that, and I admire your integrity Tim. To me, though, this doesn't sit quite right on a forum where so much valuable, hard earned information is given so freely by so many.>>

I agree with Tim: the less info is giving out in the public forum the better chance one can stay ahead of the competitors. (just kidding, one needs ingenuity to stay ahead of the competitior).

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quote:


Originally posted by:
David Tseng

I agree with Tim: the less info is giving out in the public forum the better chance one can stay ahead of the competitors. Now I learned the lesson. I think Michael Darnton finally realized that and therefore he quit posting.

That's not it... I was just being overly cautious. I've been given the word that it's okay to post pictures of the iron, just not to hand out the shape diagram. I just didn't want to post something that would give out more info than intended, there are some very sharp eyes around here...

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"I just didn't want to post something that would give out more info than intended, there are some very sharp eyes around here... "

How bizarre

Did we have to wait 300 years to get the ultimate design for a bending iron.

Someone needs to get a dose of reality.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Janito

It is common now to see asymmetrical bending irons, but I don't think it is necessary. Many old irons are quite symmetrical and work well.

The key thing is to have a curvature that is sufficiently 'tight' to handle even the most challenging C bout bends.

It is very easy to to open out an out-bent rib, but it is quite a challenge to create an aggressive bend in a figured rib without proper support.

I agree. It's easy to work with a radius that's too small, but too large and you're sc%@ed!

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