In process pictures of my first project


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Hi everyone. Here are a couple of pictures of my first project. I broke enough ribs the first go around that I had to order more material and make a new set, but I'm learning, and I'm having a lot of fun.

In the picture without the clamps, the upper right rib is just setting against the form. I finally got the bending down.

The pictures were too large and were removed. I have added them (smaller files) at the bottom of the page

Chris

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Nice!

A couple of comments:

- Your ribs look a bit thick in the photo - this can make bending difficult.

- Try practising the bending with unfigured maple ribs. It will be less prone to cracking until you get the hang of wood temp and applied pressure.

- Try and get the rib heights closer to final and even across the different bout before bending. This saves time and will reduce the risk of accidents when planing them to final dimensions.

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Yes, nice clean work and good looking flamed
maple too. I’m still on my first violin and this first stage
I thought was the easiest – it has got progressively more
difficult since. Hope this comment does not put you off. Looking
forward to seeing more progress soon.

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Also, if I might make one small suggestion, you'll get a lot more (and better) feedback, or at least more people looking at your pics, if you upload smaller files. 1.4/1.5 Mb is way too big - that's what we used to get on an entire floppy disk (I know, I'm showing my age). It's also easier to look at them if they're smaller in dimensions - they can fit on the screen all at once. I generally go for 800X600 or whatever the smaller dimension is when the big side is 800 pixels, and then I save the photo at a lower resolution. I usually get the file size under 80k. If you do this, you can also upload lots more images without running out of room...

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Thank you all for the encouragement and suggestions. It's nice to finally have something to show.

Janito. Yes. The ribs average around 1.15mm. I figured I would need the extra for scraping later.

You are correct on the width too. After messing up the first set I got paranoid. When I started my second set of ribs I wasn't sure if the lower ribs would become, due to breakage, the upper ribs, so I started bending with the ribs all the same width.

Darren. I started bending the ribs using a thin cotton cloth, dipped in water, wrung out well, then folded over on itself per the Johnson Courtnal book. I worked better for me to not fold the cloth over (less water) and to keep the rib against the iron longer after the cloth is removed. That seemed to help eliminate intermittent bending between the flames.

Tim, Yes, I didn't check into the size before I attached them. Next time they will be a much smaller file.

Chris

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Very nice work. I would urge you to glue the liners on before trying to plane all that stock off the width. I've split a couple of ribs by trying to get them close first. You don't want to go there.

I never thought about the ficture size! I used to have dial up but last year I got the slowest DSL and I don't have any problems with pictures anymore. How do you change the size without using Flicker or something like that? The photo stuff on my computer is way more complicated then I want to deal with!

I'm showing my age there. In college they did have A computer, I never saw it, you had to sign up in advance. We looked up trig values in a book and multiplied them with a big $20 (ouch) caculator with red led's that didn't even have a square root key. That was a step up, in high school we didn't even have the calculator.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
KenN

I never thought about the ficture size! I used to have dial up but last year I got the slowest DSL and I don't have any problems with pictures anymore. How do you change the size without using Flicker or something like that? The photo stuff on my computer is way more complicated then I want to deal with!


I've got high-speed cable, but a 2Mb picture makes me wait at least 45-90 seconds to see the image, and then I have to scroll this way and that to see all of it, a bit at a time. I don't usually have that much time, and if I'm peeking in from work, I don't want to download that much, they log our access. As for the software, there's always a menu item called "Image Size", it's usually off the "Edit" menu. Then, when you Save the file, you're almost always asked to choose a "Quality" range, and it often gives a tip as to what that means, in terms of k or even sometimes in terms of download speed. Truly, it does make a difference, especially on a site like this, where one thread can have many pictures, which are often shown in-line (so you don't even have a choice whether to download them!).

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quote:


Originally posted by:
KenN

Very nice work. I would urge you to glue the liners on before trying to plane all that stock off the width. I've split a couple of ribs by trying to get them close first. You don't want to go there.

r.

But if you do this, don't forget to make your linings extra-wide!

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Chris Knowlton

Hi everyone. Here are a couple of pictures of my first project. I broke enough ribs the first go around that I had to order more material and make a new set, but I'm learning, and I'm having a lot of fun. In the picture without the clamps, the upper right rib is just setting against the form. I finally got the bending down.

Chris

Welcome! Very clean work.

I am not an expert here, but have learned a lot from reading and posting my questions here. I too like to leave my ribs a bit higher than recommended since it allow me more options when bending the ribs ~ 35 mm. Also I glue a thick business card spacer on the bottom blocks which allow an even overhang of the bottom ribs of about 0.5mm. For the 2mm or so extra on the top side I use a very sharp low angle block plane with a extremely fine cut to reduce the rib height. Just be careful and follow the grain and the curve. Finally I finish it with a sanding board.

I like Ken's suggestion of gluing the linings on first before planing the top. I will follow Ken's suggestion next time. I also write everything down (like many of the suggestions found here on MN) in a notebook with hand-drawn pictures as I am working. If you plan on making #2 you may have forgotten what procedures or the order of steps you followed in making #1.

If your camera allows you to set the resolution chose something around 640 by 480 .. this was the old vga standard. or if you want to show more detail 1024 by 768. These will give you file sizes of about 35K or 70K resp.. which display very quickly.

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Manfio wrote...

"I find sanding the rib cage easier than planning it. I glue coarse sandpaper to a granite board (with contact glue) and rub the rib cage in the sandpaper till it gets the proper size."

Works for cello rib garland too...

re photo resizing... KenN wrote...

"I'm showing my age there. In college they did have A computer, I never saw it, you had to sign up in advance. We looked up trig values in a book and multiplied them with a big $20 (ouch) caculator with red led's that didn't even have a square root key. That was a step up, in high school we didn't even have the calculator."

Calculator? calculator?? Age???

Next to the monitor I have my sliderule from the 50s - I use it when I am resizing my 2 - 3 Mb pics down to 670 x 1000 (landscape) and 670 x 448 for (portrait).

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Manfio wrote: "I find sanding the rib cage easier than planning it. I glue coarse sandpaper to a granite board (with contact glue) and rub the rib cage in the sandpaper till it gets the proper size. "

I can see that the coarse sandpaper would do a quick job of removing excess rib and block, but it might leave the rib edges too frayed.

Do you finish with a fine plane or just use finer grades of sandpaper on the granite slab?

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I used a small finger plane with a very sharp blade on the c-bout ribs before I posted the pictures above. I took all of your concerns seriously and went with 220 grit sandpaper glued to my granite block to get the rest of the ribs down. It worked very well and didn't take too long. On to the linings. Thank you all for your help.

By the way, I have been reading posts from all of you for over a year while accumulating the books and tools and getting semi-proficient with sharpening before I started making shavings, so most of what I do has some of your experience in it. I'm sure that there are a great number of people that read this forum everyday silently absorbing your knowledge and looking forward to beginning their own project. This forum is really amazing.

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Did the pictures get taken down? I don't see them>>>

Re planing ribs...a larger surface sole plane (than a finger plane) is advantageous to minimize the tendancy to get an area lower than the rest. While I love my little lie nielsen, the (old) larger Stanley low angle block plane works better. Just lowering the high spots is critical or else you get to take "one more pass" around the whole thing...probably why sandpaper and granite is so popular.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Chris Knowlton

...

By the way, I have been reading posts from all of you for over a year while accumulating the books and tools and getting semi-proficient with sharpening before I started making shavings, so most of what I do has some of your experience in it. I'm sure that there are a great number of people that read this forum everyday silently absorbing your knowledge and looking forward to beginning their own project. This forum is really amazing.

Very well said indeed!

Neil

(who may never make shavings, but will continue to enjoy all the posts and shared knowledge)

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