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ok, the violin doesn't like Evah Pirazzi, what does this mean?


Seth_Leigh

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I originally had put Dominants on my 2nd violin after I finished it, and I liked the sound. My 1st violin has Evahs on it and I like the sound I get from them on that violin. I decided to try some Evahs on my 2nd violin. I was over having a lesson with my sister-in-law and after the lesson I had her play my violin intensively for a few minutes so we could hopefully remember what it sounded like with the Dominants. I then put on the Evah Pirazzi's, and she played it again, and so did I.

I'd already formed my own opinion, when she looked over and said that she actually didn't like the Evahs as much as the Dominants on this violin. I agreed. The sound is louder, but sounds kind of harsh and, as she described it, a bit tinny.

Ok, so this violin doesn't like Evahs, and does like Dominants. I may well just keep it strung with Dominants, but if I want to try another set of strings to see if I can get an improvement, knowing that this instrument doesn't like Evahs, does that tell us anything about what this violin is likely to like better? Would this be a good candidate for something like, say, Obligatos?

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A few points:

--I would not judge the sound of a string from the first few hours that it is on the fiddle. I would give it a couple of days before deciding you don't like them. Evahs can sound pretty strident when first put on and then settle in pretty quickly.

-- Consider the gauge. Are we dealing with medium gauge? Heavy gauge, from my experience, rarely sound good for any brand of string. Going to light gauge would give you less of a strident sound.

-- Consider the sound a few yards away. That can be a much mellower sound than you hear under the ear.

-- If you feel Evahs are too strident, more mellow strings would be the Pirastro Obligato and D'addario Zyex (light gauge for Zyex).

-- A lot of players would be very happy to sacrifice mellowness to get more volume from a fiddle. So, the tone you might not like may be just the tone that a serious player would like.

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I have been going through a mid-life crisis recently (at 19), and have been changing strings on my violins left, right and centre (Obligatos, Dominants, Evahs, Helicores; not Zyex).

I agree that the strings seem to find their mate...

Of the 4 I fiddled with, all have ended up back with Evahs, but I am not happy with one of them (too bright, harsh etc).

I will be trying to mellow it this weekend by changing from Bois de H cord to a Sacconi nylon cord.

----------------

(at 19), just kidding

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Interesting comments. Thanks all who have replied so far. I have left the Evahs on for now, and I'm going to play with them for a while to get a better feel for how they really sound, and to see how the sound changes over time as the strings play in or break in or whatever. I also want to get my sister-in-law to play the violin from across a large room and see how it sounds. This is interesting stuff for me.

In the meantime I'll try reading up on some of these other string types that have been mentioned, to learn more about them. If I decide after a few days that I really don't like the Evahs, I'll put the Dominants back on, first, and continue the string hunt at some subsequent time.

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Aren't  "string hunts" fun?

When you go back on yours, you may want to try the Infelds, blue

and red varieties, also by Thomastic.

I find them to have a sweeter, finer tone quality than

the Dominants.  Reliable, not temperamental, and they hold up

through many months of playing in various levels of humidity and

temperature.

My hunt ended peacefully when I found the Infelds.

Of course, we know how subjective this all is, with each

instrument and player being unique individuals as we are. Enjoy the

process!

Regards, Varnish

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In my experience some strings are just wrong for some violins. Although I have not liked Evahm mediums on some of my violins, those very instruments seem to do wonderfully with Evah-stark strings (the thicker gauge).

Obligatos do offer a contrasting tonal texture. And for instruments that have troublesome G strings, or are mellow without the strength and projection you want, you might find the new Larsen Tzigane strings solve the problems - but these are more limited in use and can ne almost useless on some violins (on which the Tzigane G string can act like a rubber band).

It seems to me that each instrument has a certain spectrum of frequency response/amplitude behaviors and will do best with strings that are able to engage these frequencies. Therefor, if you have (for example) a bright instrument and want to engage its deeper voice with strings like Obligatos, that have a deep richness, you may well find that not only does the instrument have no response to that stimulation, but that you have also lost the very character of its higher voice, too.

Searching for the right strings can be expensive - and time consuming.

Andy

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"Searching for the right strings can be expensive - and time consuming."

Amen, brother! Still looking for the "right" strings for my main violin, and I've had it for just short of 4 years! Went through Dominant, Tonica, Obligato, Infeld Blue and now Infeld Red, which is the best so far. I talked to its maker a month or so ago and he says he's found that his fiddles perform best with Evah's so I may try one more...

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One thing that concerns me is that the soundpost and bridge on that instrument I carved and fitted myself. And I'm just a newb, having completed only two instruments so far. I am 100% convinced that my instrument is not putting out all its capable of, and I'm kind of hesitant to spend anymore on strings until I've spent a little and got a competent, professional setup on it.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
Seth_Leigh

One thing that concerns me is that the soundpost and bridge on that instrument I carved and fitted myself. And I'm just a newb, having completed only two instruments so far. I am 100% convinced that my instrument is not putting out all its capable of, and I'm kind of hesitant to spend anymore on strings until I've spent a little and got a competent, professional setup on it.

Seth,

I think you're right in emphasizing set-up.

I got a brand new fiddle from Tschu Ho Lee. He told me to bring it back to him in about a year's time to get it adjusted, after it's had some time to settle in. I took it back to him about a year later and told him that the fiddle had lost some of its sparkle that it had in its first few months.

I noted to him that I had not changed strings (Obligato) since getting the fiddle, and maybe that's the reason for the loss of sparkle. He waved off that idea, giving the impression that strings had little to do with it, even one year old strings.

After he made his adjustments, he put back on those same one year old strings, and the fiddle sparkled just fine. A new set of strings after that adjustment added a subtle bit of additional brilliance, but the really big difference came about through his sound post adjustments, not new strings.

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Hello!  I had the same experience with my violin.  My

violin  originally came with Dominant string and tried the

Evah and didn't like the loud and too bright sound.

 I just also tried the obligato and

but don’t really care for those

either. I suggest you

 stick to what you like best or how they sound on the violin.

 

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I had a nice violin testing session, today, trying violins made by Boise, Idaho, maker, Ray Leicht, one of whose violins I have and like a lot. The violins had a range of different string sets: Evah, Dominants, Helicore. Concerning strings, we decided that while strings might make a difference, it really wasn't worth the violin maker's time trying different sets of strings on an instrument to get some wanted sound. The maker is best served by putting on a well recognized brand, Evah, Dominants, etc, and then optimizing the instrument with setup for a free, ringing sound and good response. Then, let the player spend his time and money swapping out strings to optimize the sound to the player's own preference, a preference the maker would be hard pressed to know, anyway.

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