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mommag

Wants to know pros and cons of glued or not glued bow tip

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Hi, I am just a mother of a child who studies violin, so I don't

have a lot of knowledge.  If someone can help me out with

explaining the difference of glued and not glued bow tip, I'd

greatly appreciate it.  The other day, my son's teacher

suggested that he should get his bow rehaired.  So I took it

to a local violin shop to have it done.  I brought it home and

seemed every thing was fine until the next day, when my son tried

to play the bow hair just came off the bow.  Nothing was

broken, but that the tip where the hair is held by a tiny block of

wood popped out.  I took it back to the guy and he told me

that he doesn't use glue to hold the bow hair, but the hole the

block was   wasn't deep enough, so he adjusted it and now it

seems to be fine.  But I'm afraid it might pop out anytime.

 Or am I concerned too much?  Which method is popularly

used, glued or not glued?

 

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Since that tiny block will be removed the next time the bow will be rehaired, it's better not using glue, it would make the remotion more difficult and perhaps cause damage to the bow. You are too concerned, I think, take it easy. Ciao!

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" font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: Arial;">I’ve never heard of
someone gluing the hair into position.  The hair should simply
hold with the force of the wooden cork.  Was the bow abused at
all? 



" font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: Arial;"> 



" font-size: 10.0pt; font-family: Arial;">If you do glue the hair
into position, it will just make a mess of things, and probably be
pretty difficult to clean out when rehairing the next
time.

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The tip wedge (which, by the way, really shouldn't be cork, but some other wood such as poplar) occasionally pops out. The same thing can happen with the wedge inside the frog also. It shouldn't really happen - especially right after a rehair, but there you go, such is the price we pay for having to live in the physical universe :-0

As others have pointed out, it isn't anything to worry about.

As long as the guy who did the rehair fixed the problem and didn't charge anything extra, I would consider it a fairly routine "problem". But definately fully the responsibility of the rehair person.

Sometimes it is just the fact that mistakes happen and sometimes it is that more and more the bows that are sold do not have the proper mortice, or the hair came glue in to begin with, and the rehair person has to "wing it" in order to get the bow rehaired...

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A simple solution is to cut a new block (slightly bigger). It happened to me too.

I brought my bow back to the luthier who did the re-hair and told him I did not want to

to make this kind of trips that wasted his time and mine. So he agreed to cut a new block, free of charge of course. They use a thread to tie the hair (not glue as I know)

PS. Don't throw away the old block. The luthier needs it as a guide to

cut a new one.

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I bought that bow from online string instrument retailer. I believe this was the first time I had the hair rehaired on this bow. The guy said there was a residue of the glue inside the hole where the tip wedge is supposed to be placed. Maybe the glue is used in mass production bow? He said he tends to put a little more hair than usual and probably small space between the bow and the block wasn't enough to hold the hair securely, so he scraped a little bit of the block to fit the hair right. Well, I have another bow that needs to be rehaired. Hopefully the tip wedge won't pop out this time.

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Far too many inexpensive bows these days have mortises that are not properly cut and bow hair that has been glued in place. I curse the bow making factories that churn out these kind of bows. In self defense, I usually correct the mortise on either or both of the tip and frog before re-hairing the bow. I do this because the probability is very high that an improperly cut mortises will lead to a loss of the tip wedge or a slipping of the bow hair in the frog, rendering the bow unusable because the bow hair can not be tightened enough. Both of these problems ultimately reflect badly on the person who did the re-hair. I also re-cut mortises on the chance that I will be getting the bow for another re-hair some time in the future and I don't want to waste my time fitting wedges to badly cut mortises. It is just a case of doing it right the first time. Although it does happen, it is a real inconvenience for players to have to return a recently re-haired bow to get a loose tip wedge replaced.

Terry

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Tell your son to relax the tension on the hair only enough to relax the bow - but don't relax it so much that the hair flops. When it looses that much tension is when kids bump the bow and the resulting vibration lets the plug drop out.

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quote:


Originally posted by:
troutabout

Tell your son to relax the tension on the hair only enough to relax the bow - but don't relax it so much that the hair flops. When it looses that much tension is when kids bump the bow and the resulting vibration lets the plug drop out.

Yes, I give the same advice.

Another thing I do is tell people not to tap their music stand with the bow tip, which a surprising number of people seem to want to do.

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Oh, you are asking me to do a very tough thing! I tell my son all the time to be careful with the bow ( and the instrument). I think his pre-teenage brain is losing some neurons. Conveniently he manages to forget everytime! Although this instance he just took the instrument and bow out of his case and drew a first chord and the bow hair came off, I need to show him this thread. Troutabout and ctviolin, I will keep your advise in mind and make sure he is not loosening the bow hair too much.

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Happens to the best of us!... I always rework the mortice when it is off spec... and I never reuse the wedge. I simply find it more satisfying to spend a little extra time to cut a well fitting wedge with the proper front to back tension....and Mom....I don't think your son is losing neurons... he is just focussed on his music. In the case of real talented kids, their artistic motivations often override their concern for material matters... so your son might just be a genius!

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